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Full text of "S.F. News Letter (Jan.-June 1898)"

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American 

Leading 

(orsels 

W.B. 



Corsets are modeled 
and cut in such a 
manner that they give 
grace and beauty 

to every figure. 









TJhe JLocetl JLeader 

JE PALACE HOTEL 



Champagnes at 
£ astern trricej: 

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Pints S2.00 
Quarts S3. 90 






Aak your grocer 
reliable 





Trade' 



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Mark 



GE.0RGE GOODMAN. 



Patentee and Manur*' 



The Clitt House 



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Proprietor 
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» !<i:.:u].ir Table 
if wine 



Artificial Stone. 



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ISebillloger I Patent! 
Bide walk and Garden walk a specialty 

3&7 Montgou Nova da block 

Sao Frui 

BUSWELL CO., 

Bookbinder, Paper-Ruler, Printer 
and Blank Book Manufacturer. 
618 Commercial 8t.,8. f. 



SOME BUILDERS 
order galvanized iron rolled 
om: gauge and stenciled an- 
other. 

We don't accept such 
orders. 
Apollo Iron and Steel Company, 
Pittsburgh, Pa, 



DON'T HIDE YOUR LIGHT UNDER A BUSHEL " 
THAT'S JUST WHY WE TALK ABOUT 

SAPOLIO 





THE- 



Oter/ing 



& 



College San ffiafaei 

For Young Ladies. 



i a no 



Benl. Gurtaz & Son, .soienaenu. 



or ArrilUga, 
sdlna, IV"'' 
Loul King. Coli. 

Theatre. 

ACCOMMODATING TERMS 



la. 1H, and 'JO OTARItKLL 8TRI 



Conducted by the Sisters of St. Dominic. 
Full collegic cnufs.-of Mtudies- A boarding school of highest 
modern building. Steam heated. Beautiful 
and commodious class rooms. Musk- and art PO 

Located In the lovely Magnolia Valley. 
For t*-auty and bcalthfulness. Addr< 

MOTHER SUPERIOR, 

College San Rafael. San Rafael, Cal 



GRAY BROS.,- 



3ie M' 

MJ6 Neil • Anie-i. 



fi oncrete a nd . _ 
ArtillGlal Stone Work. 



The BROOKS-FOLLIS ELEC1RIC CORPORATION, 

Importera and Jobbers of pi p/^TDIfAl 

523 Mission St. Tel. /VUln KOI SUPPLIES 

Ban Francisco. Cal 



MORRIS & KENNEDY'S 

Art Gallery. Q 

ftt Greatlu Reduced Prices. 



19 and 21 POST ST . S f 

New and Elegant PAINTINGS 
PICTURES and FRAMES. 



Joseph Gillott's Steel Pens. 



Gold Medals. Paris. 1878-1889. These pens are " the 
best In the world." Sole agent for the United States 
Mr. Henry Hoe, 91 John street, New York. 
Sold by all Stationers. 



Price per Copy, 10 Cents. 



Annual Subscription, $4.00 



i^^^^i^, 1122 





Vol.LVl. 



SAN FRANCISCO, JANUARY I, 1898. 



Number 1. 



Printed and Published every Saturday by th,prof.rutor FtED MABR1CT1 
5V4 Kearny street. San Francisro. Entered at San Francisco Post- 
office a* Second-class Matter. 

The office of the HMWB LETTER in Stic Tort Cits/ it al Temple Court; 
and at Chicago. 903 Boyce Building. {Frank E Morrison, Eastern 
Representative), trhere information maybe obtained regarding subscrip- 
tion and advertising rates. 

FROM present indications there will be further delay in 
the Durrant ca«e. The appetite for technicalities 
that prevails in our courts and lengthens our criminal 
dockets, make it, unfortunately, easy for the guilty to 
stay the tardy hand of justice and prolong their superflu- 
ous lives. Small wonder that crime increases in the 
United States, and that ten thousand homicides are re- 
corded for every year in this country. 

IT is noted that a handsome lady in the East, with more 
beauty than biains, died in the "operating parlors" of 
a "beauty doctor." That this fate has not overtaken a 
considerable number of the fair sex of this city who visit 
the numerous fake dermatologists, face-bleachers, and 
skin and tissue builders, who fatten off their gullible 
patients, is a mystery. These monumental frauds should 
be scourged from the city or sent to jail for obtaining 
money under false pretenses, to say nothing of punishment 
for the irreparable physical damage that they frequently 
inflict upon those who visit their dens. 



iy| R. Joseph D. Grant, of this city, was singled out by 
Jl the yellow journal for attack because his name ap- 
peared as a Freeholder on the fusion ticket. The Exam- 
iner not being able to find any fault in the character or 
business standing of the candidate, proceeded in a public 
way to ridicule Mr. Grant because he dresses and lives 
like a gentleman. This in Mr. Hearst's paper is a gross 
misdemeanor, but the people of San Francisco prefer a 
clean-living man, even if he does dress correctly; but it 
shows to what smallnesses the Examiner will descend in 
its vain efforts to injure reputable citizens. 

THE manner in which sea-going vessels are fitted out 
can be learned from the recent letter written byS. P. 
Durfee, first officer steamship Cleveland, to a daily paper 
referring to one of the ship's boats as "an old and unsea- 
worthy metallic concern, which stood a very poor chance in- 
deed." This is rather plain speaking, and, if true, the 
owners of the Cleveland ought to be held responsible for 
sending out their vessel provided with old and unsea- 
worthy boats. In the rush to the gold fields, any old 
thing, so long as it would float, was sent north, and it will 
be eminently proper next spring that each ship going 
Alaskaward should be properly inspected before she be 
permitted to leave this port. 

LABOR Commissioner Fitzgerald has returned from 
Washington, and brings with him assurances that the 
Lodge Bill, restricting immigration, will become a law at 
this session of Congress. It has long been a cause for 
criticism that politicians have been so willing to legislate 
against the free introduction of the product of European 
"pauper labor," while at the same time they refuse to 
shut out the hands that make these identical goods. The 
fact that the immigrant usually is worth a vote within a 
very short time of his arrival on these hospitable shores 
has secured him from the protective policy that has 
passed bj the over-crowded toiling millions at home and 
thrown a guard-wall around the millions of the wealthy 
manufacturers. The Lodge Bill is a half-hearted and in- 
adequate measure, but it is better than nothing at all. 



FIERCE war wages among the physicians of the city 
over the Hirschfelder discovery for the cure of tuber- 
culosis, and the breach threatens to rend the medical fra- 
ternity from top to bottom. It appears to a layman that 
careful investigation would be the better way to reach the 
truth; that professional courtesy ought not to be incon- 
sistent with reason, and that noise rarely settles anything 
excepting those who make it. 



THE reform school at Whittier is to be enlarged, and 
$100,000 of the people's money expended for that 
purpose. The history of the Whittier Institution does not 
justify the expenditure of money upon its enlargement. 
Scandal, mismanagement, abuse of inmates, and complete 
disorganization have been the history at Whittier for the 
past year. Children and youths who are sent to that in- 
stitution to be reformed leave it more incorrigible than 
when they go there. Discipline there is none; brutality 
everywhere. California would be a distinct gainer if the 
reform school at Whittier were reformed out of existence. 
Better nail up its windows, bolt its doors, and hire a 
watchman to care for the State's property at Whittier, 
than pay out more money to increase its capacity and en- 
large its sphere for the dissemination of evil. 



THE fifteen freeholders selected from the Charter Com- 
mittee of one hundred were elected last Monday to 
frame a charter for submission to the people of San Fran- 
cisco for ratification or rejection. We have had several 
charter elections in this city of recent years, and they 
have always been beaten. The men elected on Monday to 
make a charter are for the most part prominent citizens. 
If they submit a practical and reasonable instrument, one 
that will regard all interests impartially and justly, their 
work will be ratified by the taxpayers. Their election 
does not indicate the final choice of the electors of San 
Francisco, as an analysis of Monday's vote shows that but 
about one-seventh of the voters of the city endorsed the 
men chosen. San Francisco needs a new charter. It is the 
question of getting an instrument that will deal with the 
present and future of the city from a broad and compre- 
hensive standpoint that is all-important. 



WASHINGTON dispatches say that hereafter claims 
tor increase of pensions will not be considered within 
one year from the last action by the Department, either 
for allowance or rejection. This simply shuts out from 
second consideration within twelve months any case, which 
will presumably give the thousands of hungry claim- 
ants now impatiently knocking at Uncle Sam's money bags 
a better opportunity to get their fingers in. The grab- 
bers are not satisfied with what they have obtained. The 
vast sum of $140,000,000, that was spent last year, was 
not enough, but an ambitious patriot in Congress has in- 
troduced a bill raising last year's appropriation a trifle of 
ten millions. It ma}' be incidentally noted that there are 
to-day in the United States ten survivors of the war of 
1812, and three thousand widows of soldiers of that war 
who are now drawing pensions. At the same ratio of fe- 
male longevity, in 1948 there will be over 100,000 widows 
of soldiers of the rebellion subsisting upon the loyal purse 
of a grateful and united country. This pension roll, hon- 
ored by all honest men whenever and wherever it is right- 
fully inscribed, needs an overhauling, and the old soldiers 
are more interested in that process of purification than 
any other class of citizens. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January i, 1898. 



PASSING FROM 1897 TO 1898. 

BY the time this issue of the News Letter meets the 
eyes of its many readers, the year 1897 will have 
passed away to the long line of its predecessors, and the 
year 1898 will have entered upon what we hope, and most 
thoroughly believe, will be an eventful career. Soon the 
twentieth century will be upon us, and what marvels it 
may have to reveal to an astonished world we may not 
know or even conjecture. If the great scheme of evolu- 
tion is true to itself, it will go on expanding all the time, 
human intelligence will develop with it, and with higher in- 
telligences to what lengths may not the future achieve- 
ments of the race extend? The presages of many coming 
events are already upon us. We know that science has 
scarcely yet mastered the A B C of that marvelous ele- 
ment—electricity. The measure of its powers ate as yet 
unthinkable, but so also are the ultimate capacities of the 
human mind. With advancing powers of thought, men 
will conquer all that is knowable, and to that there is 
apparently no end. That the discoveries, inventions, and 
general progress of mankind durirg the 19th century are 
unparalleled is indubitably true, but, so far, we have but 
reached the point at which only a comparatively few men 
have been trained to a capacity for original thought. But 
today the schoolmaster is abroad in many lands. With 
education and competition universal, we may reasonably 
conclude that the next century will surpass the present, 
as far as it has beaten the records of all previous ones. If 
we could all come back to this world a thousand years 
hence— and perhaps in a spiritual form we may — what 
wonders woull meet our eyes I Meanwhile, the world goes 
marching on, and all the men and women in it are in the 
procession. 

The present is full of indications of what may follow. 
All force, propulsion, and energy will come from elec- 
tricity, which we are only just beginning to learn how 
to chain. Ere long we shall be its master, and it, man's 
most useful servant. Steamers will be propelled through 
the ocean at possibly from "ill to 100 miles an hour, by the 
use of storage batteries. Enough is already known to re- 
move all fear of the exhaustion of our coal pits. Steam 
will ultimately be superseded by a stronger and cheaper 
force. Men will fly to parts unknown, and may even 
learn how toovercome unfavorable atmospheric conditions, 
and so reach Mars, and even our own Moon. People will 
speak through telephones to their kia across the seas. 
The competition in commerce will not always be what it is. 
M.-n will become wise enough to learn what product and 
manufacture are best suited to their country, and direct 
their energies accordingly. In that way there will be 
production enough to go around. The hours of labor will 
be shorter, and articles of industry will be cheaper, be- 
cause improved methods will call for less labor, and will 
lessen the cost of production. Steamers will ply from 
port to port, and from country to country so rapidly, that 
the old system of barter will come into vogue again, and 
the uses for money in trade and commerce will almost 
wholly disappear. Articles of general use will become 
mediums of exchange at market values, and the "gold 
bug" will be little heard of. The debtor nations will force 
the creditor ones to take payment in kind, for in no other 
way can the national debts be extinguished. The world 
owes England ten billions of dollars in gold, while there 
exist only about four billions to pay it with. Clearly, 
therefore, if a day of settlement ever conies, we shall 
have to open our stores, our warehouses and our granaries, 
in order to discharge our debt. The payment of the 
various national debts is the great problem of a not far 
distant future. There will be a common language used, at 
least among the trading nations, and all these things 
working together will make for the brotherhood of man 
and the Fatherhood of God. 

The present century, however, has yet two years to 
live, and from present indications they promise to be two 
lively years, pregnant with events. Europe is an armed 
camp. Its harbors bristle with guns, and great armor- 
clad ships of war, more destructive than the world ever 
before saw, frown with menacing mien upon every possible 
port of entry. All these forces of destruction are in a 
state of unrest, many of them are moving, while all are 
ready for the order to "let slip the dogs of war." No 



man can tell what a day may bring forth. A little over a 
week has sufficed to see the principal harbors of China 
occupied, and its vast and populous empire practically 
divided among three or four of the great powers. What 
China is to become is their hands it is hard to say. With 
a population of more than one-third of the entire globe, 
her availability for the purposes of war has no doubt im- 
pelled the powers to the course they seem bent upon. The 
Chinese Government practically collapsed during the war 
with Japan, and was at the mercy of that power, or even 
at that of any soldier of fortune, less principled than 
Gordon, who might bring his genius to the organization 
and training of a Chinese army. That Russia, France and 
Germany saw loss to themselves in the future success of 
Japanese arms, was apparent enough by their interfer- 
ence at the time. That they had designs themselves was 
not suspected, except that Russia desired Port Arthur as 
an outlet for her great Siberian railroad. The events of 
the past two weeks have suddenly opened the eyes of the 
world to the most peaceful, but, at the same time, to the 
most momentuous conquest of this or any other age, and 
have given to the closing days of the year a genuine sen- 
sation. 

The closing year has witnessed the beginning and the 
ending of the Gra^co-Turkish war, with results that civili- 
zation can but deplore. Those results are a disgrace to 
the nations of Christian Europe, who had but to say to the 
Turk "hands off," and they would have been kept off 
accordingly. It seems marvelous strange that they could 
swallow up a mighty empire at a single gulp, but could not 
agree to tell "a sick man" to take to his bed. In our own 
dear country we have been free from all real danger of 
war, although our jingoes, in the press and out of it, have 
contrived most of the time to keep us on the ragged edge 
of doubt and anxiety as to what the outcome would be in 
several instances. This war talk ought to cease until we 
have some tangible grievance that can be settled in no 
other way but the arbitrament of the sword, and not even 
then, unless we first supply ourselves with an army and a 
navy equal to those of the most decrepid power in Europe 
— Spain. With the Monroe Doctrine maintained, without 
serious dispute from any quarter; with a treaty of arbitra- 
tion with Great Britain a matter of our own free will, and 
with nobody seeking trouble with us, there is no outside 
danger of the United States being involved in a foreign 
war, and there will be none unless our sensational news- 
papers and our politicians make it. 

Commercially and financially the year of 1897 has been 
a notable one. Its beginning witnessed the hardest times 
this country ever saw. Its ending finds us with confidence 
restored, business active, the farmers prosperous, and the 
prospects of the new year too good almost for belief. If 
half that is expected be realized, our readers will undoubt- 
edly secure the happy uew year which the News Letter 
most sincerely wishes them. 

The Pirates China to-day presents a spectacle such as 
Of To-day. has never before been seen in the world's 
history. Here is an enormous nation with 
an ancieut history, ancient arts, a settled civilization, and 
an ancient dynasty, being treated exactly like an African 
strip of territory, peopled by savages. Three robber 
nations are calmly deciding upon dividing the country, and 
the sole restraint upon their thieving propensities is the 
mutual fear they have of each other. There seems to be 
no idea of justice or the rights of nations entertained by 
them. An insane Emperor, with much flamboyancy, dis- 
patches a squadron to the shores of a nation with whom it 
is at peace, and coolly absorbs a large stretch of country. 
Was there ever seen so bigh-handed a piratical policy 
since the rights of nations were inaugurated? And in- 
stead of there being a protest made by other nations 
against this outrage upon the rights of man or nations, 
two other powers are following a mad ruler's example 
to secure for themselves equal power in China. And what 
is China's position? She is practically friendless in the 
great comity of nations. The only friend she has, if the 
dispatches are to be believed, is Japan, who, seeing with 
alarmed eyes this grab-all policy, naturally rushes to the 
rescue of a neighbor nation —for if seizure of territory can 
be accomplished by European concert in China, what is 
there to prevent the same being done in Japan? England 



January I, (89S 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



was long regarded as the Protector Nation. Lord Beacons- 
field protected Constantinople when Russian officers were 
daily to be seen in Adrianople, and he saved Turkey from 
dismemberment. But her policy in the Orient seems for 
many years to have been half-hearted and vacillating. 
The bugbear of Russia appear.-, to have almost a paralytic 
effect upon English councils. Russia has slowly extended 
her boundaries on the east toward Afghanistan, and 
though she attempted to supplant British influence there, 
the attempt was a failure. Now she has changed her base 
of operations, and China is the seat of intrigue. It can 
hardly be believed that China would dismiss from her em- 
ploy Sir Robert Hart, who has for years administered the 
Customs, and supplanted him by a Russian. The trouble 
with China is. there is no national feeling. The people 
have neither love of country nor of flag. The court is an 
isolated body. This is China's weakness, but does this 
warrant the atrocious acts of piracy that are now being 
perpetrated upon her borders? If aDy nation that is in- 
herently weak is to be attacked and divided, what pre- 
vents the partitioning of other equally as unprotected 
States? It is a queer ending of the Nineteenth Century, 
when the feeling is, that the sense of justice is dead, and 
no dissentient voice is raised against the European 
piratical policy in the Orient. 

Some time ago the News Let- 

Insuranee Commissioner ter took occasion to criticise 
Clunie. the peculiar action of Insurance 

Commissioner Clunie, in his un- 
reasoning attitude toward the insurance companies of this 
city. The Commissioner has shown a disposition to annoy 
and harass the insurance business of San Francisco. His 
attitude has been personal rather than public, and he has 
issued orders and construed laws in amanner unwarranted 
by either reason or precedent. The Commissioner now 
makes announcement that he will refuse to renew the 
licenses of all companies that confess to membership in 
the local Board of Underwriters. In other words, the 
members of .this beneficial organization will be denied the 
privilege of doing business in California by Mr. Clunie, on 
the ground that they are members of a trust, and hence 
inimical to the public policy. This contention on its face 
is erroneous, for, since the alleged "trust" was formed, 
rates have been materially reduced, in some cases as much 
as ten per cent. 

The Commissioner parades that clause of the civil code 
which provides that foreign corporations shall not be per- 
mitted to do business under more favorable conditions than 
are granted to home companies, and will make its pro- 
visions the basis of objection to English and German cor- 
porations that have for years been licensed without pro- 
test. The Commissioner's telescopic eye has also delved 
among the enactments of the Legislature, and the pro- 
visions of the code relating to the government of the life 
insurance companies will receive attention. 

The retaliatory acts will be put in motion against both 
the fire and life companies of such States, particularly 
New York, as have laws affecting insurance companies, 
differing from our own. The life companies will be re- 
quired to furnish abstracts of all business done in this 
State during the past twelve years, which will include a 
complete history of each policy written. Altogether a 
lively and expensive time is anticipated by the companies, 
and for no other reason presumably than because Mr. Clu- 
nie considers that he has not been treated by the managers 
with the degree of consideration due his exalted office. 

The history of the insurance business of this coast does 
not in any sense justify the Commissioner in his Quixotic 
course, and his assault upon the companies doing business 
here is a flagrant illustration of the appointment of an un- 
worthy and incompetent man to a position of responsi- 
bility and large importance. 

A Speech About Mr. Smalley, for many years the able 
Old and New editor of the New York Times, but now 
England. the American correspondent of the Lon- 

don Times, ought to be a man well-fitted 
by birth, education, and wide experience to do justice to 
the toast of "old and new England." A son of New Eng- 
land, he has lived most of his time in this country, and has 
met its leading men on equal terms. He was for a time a 



journalist in London, and mixed with its politics. For 
these reasons, it is to be presumed, he was the other even- 
ing, at a banquet in Boston, called upon to speak to the 
toast "of old and new England." In the course of the very 
able address he delivered, he took occasion to express some 
very strong opinions as to the good relations that ought 
to exist between the two countries, but, unhappily, do not. 
He placed the blame almost entirely on the American side, 
and said among other things that the mother country had 
been subjected to many snubs at our hands, and had shown 
a spirit of forbearance and a desire for friendly intercourse 
that were not being met half way, nor met at all. He 
instanced the Venezuelan threat of war, and the rejection 
of the arbitration treaty as instances in point. He might 
have added that the tone of a large number of our daily 
newspapers was purposely made as offensive as it could 
be. According to them, nothing good can come out of 
the Nazareth, which they are constantly making Great 
Britain out to be. Under such training, young America 
is growing up to believe England to be the sum of all the 
iniquities, and that some day we shall take the insolence 
out of her. Meanwhile, the old country laughs and goes 
on never minding, seeming to say that such abuse amuses 
us, whilst it does her no harm. We do not know about 
that. It may not hurt now, but who can tell what will 
come of a whole generation being raised in bitter preju- 
dice ? If the truth were fully told, it would be seen that 
war between us and Great Britain is practically impossi- 
ble. In the first place, it is necessary to find a casus belli 
that would appeal to the enlightened judgment of man- 
kind. None such exists, and the mother country is tak- 
ing every care that none shall spring up. England is 
ready for war; we are not. Within ten days every im- 
portant harbor we have could be closed to the purposes 
of trade and commerce, and panic and distress would 
quickly be known throughout all our borders. We are a 
trading and commercial people, and, as such, are putting 
Great Britain and her colonies to the very best use that 
can be made of them. We are selling them more goods 
than are taken from us by all the rest of the world com- 
bined. For that reason, if for no other, war is impossible. 
To hurt the purchasing power of the people of old England 
would be to kill the goose that lays the golden egg. 

The Recent British The recent defeat which the British 
Reverses. arms have suffered in Afghanistan 

has greater significance than would 
at first appear. Owing to the rigorous press regulations 
the news that filters through the medium of correspond- 
ents who are staff ofticers, is colored, and the extent of 
disasters is not infrequently mitigated. But despite this 
fact, the intelligence that English troops were bundled 
neck and crop out of the Afridi country is sufficiently 
alarming. The hold Great Britain has upon the whole 
Empire of India is based upon fear, and the individual 
courage of the Englishmen, and when that prestige is once 
destoyed there must come the inevitable reaction. The 
entire military system of England seems to be at fault, and 
reverses like the one in the Khyer Pass, which the press 
says is due to the soldiers being undisciplined boys, speaks 
unfavorably for voluntary enlistment. The short service 
system which prevails in England is not calculated to make 
tried soldiers, and though the idea is abhorrent to English- 
men, there seems no other way to maintain an army than 
by the methods which are employed on the European con- 
tinent. Whenever there has been a general war scare, 
the crowds of men that have volunteered for active ser- 
vice has proved that patriotism is not dead in England, 
but raw troops, such as these necessarily would be, are in 
themselves a menace and a danger to veterans of their 
own corps. Whether England will ever introduce forced 
enlistments is a question which cannot easily be answered; 
but that there have been attempts made suggestive of this 
system cannot be denied. After the murder of Major 
Cavagnari in Kabul, the British Envoy, some twenty 
years ago, the alarm throughout India was most general. 
And it was then the Government instituted a European 
volunteer movement in India. The Government plainly in- 
dicated by this that each Englishman in India must be his 
own protector, and that by the formation of such corps in 
each station where there was a large body of civilians 
they would have to defend themselves in case of a general 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January i, 1898. 



uprising. The appalling defeat in Kabul will create a feel- 
ing of unrest throughout India. It will be the common 
talk in every bazaar, and the impression will again be re- 
vived that the English are vulnerable. The Afghan comes 
of a war-like race. His whole life is given to the pursuit 
of war, and though it was the boast of the Indian Govern- 
ment that the Afghans twenty years ago had been com- 
pletely subjugated, it would appear thut the vaunt was 
an empty one when a single tribe has successfully with- 
stood the might of Great Britain. 

Our Hospitality Our exchanges to hand by the last mail 
To Foreign from Australia make very serious 
Murderers. charges against the administration of 
Justice in California, which we could 
wish it were in our power to answer. It appears that bills 
are still being sent to New South Wales on account 
of charges alleged to be due on account of the arrest and 
extradition of the notorious Butler, 
who was arrested here by colonial 
detectives, sent for the purpose, long 
after Durrant was arraigned for the 
crimes which he has not yet expiated. 
Butler was taken back, fairly tried, 
convicted by an impartial jury, and 
six weeks thereafter, the time al- 
lowed by law, he was duly executed 
for one of the many cowardly murders 
of which he had been guilty. All that 
is straight enough, but from the time 
of Butler's extradition, until the lat- 
est mail advices, claims, sanctioned 
by the United States Marshal, have 
been impudently sent to a Govern- 
ment that had no part or lot in incur- 
ring them. It appears that even the 
police officers have sent in accounts 
that, to say the least, are extraordi- 
nary. The Attorney General of New 
South Wales has written a pungent 
letter that ought to bring shame to 
the cheeks of some people we know. 
He says: ''The extradition proceed- 
ings in America occupied nearly four 
months. In this country the extradi- 
tion court, the coroner's inquest, the 
examination of 21 witnesses, autopsy 
on discovered bodies, granting of the 
warrant, securing the signature of 
the Governor, obtaining the verifica- 
tion of the papers by the U. S. 
Consul, and the departure of the de- 
tectives, occupied one day only. The 
proceedings in America engaged the 
attention of the Court for eleven days, 
and when Butler was returned to the 
colony, his trial occupied two days 
and a half from beginning to end. 
This case in America ought not to 
have occupied more than one day, and 
I will venture to say that if the mat- 
ter had been left to the control of our 
own police, it would not have occupied 
more than that time. The police who 
were on hand to arrest Butler, the 
officers who were on duty at the jail, 
all have made enormous charges for 
their services. The gentleman who 
presided over the Court, the Marshal, 
all the officials in connection with the 
court, have been paid at a high rate 
of remuneration. It is all extraordi- 
nary tome, and I cannot understand 
that there are no authorities in Cali- 
fornia to control such matters. It 
was certainly not intended when the 
extradition treaties were framed that 
such charges should be made. Many 
applications have been made to this 
country for extradition, which have al- 
ways been promptly granted and with- 
out a farthing's cost to the apply- 



ing Government. I shall deem it my duty to advise the 
Government in all future cases to allow unreciprocating 
Governments to keep our criminals, and thus avoid the 
risk of being asked for such extraordinary payments as 
these." No words of ours could add force to the Attorney 
General's case, except to mention two facts: — when a few 
years ago, we made a demand upon the New South Wales 
for Maxwell, the murderer of Preller, he was promptly 
hunted down, arrested, and delivered to our agent, with- 
out one cent of cost. When six Siberian criminals were 
picked up at sea and brought to this port, the cry of the 
sensational press was that they must not be extradited. 
Russia did not ask for them. Within a fortnight three of 
them were behind the bars for assaults upon the person, 
and soon thereafter a fifth had murdered in cold blood a 
German grocer and his wife at Sacramento. A stronger 
arraignment than this of our judicial methods could hardly 
be put in the form of words. 




JANUARY 

Roden's Corner 

a new novel by 

SETON MERR1MAN 



HENRY 



The location of the 
story is in London 
and The Hague. It 
is rich in incident 
and character. 




Th_- illustrations 
were drawn by T. 
de Thulstrup, from 
studies made in Hol- 
land and London. 



The New Northwest 

By J. A. WHEELOCK 

lie " Pimn • .■ . SI, Paul, Minn. ■ 

A Group of Players Massai's Crooked Trail 

By Laurence Hutton. Handsomely ill'd. i Written and ill'd by Frederic Remington. 

SHORT STORIES 
The Sixth Sense, by Margaret Si 1 ion Uriscof ; Between the Lines 
at Stone River, l.y Captain F. A. Mux mil; The Blazing Hen-coop, by 
Octavk Tii.inu ; The King of Beaver, by Mary Haktivku C vthekwood ; 
Margrave, Bachelor, by Clara Maynard Parker; A Holiday Episode, 
by John C 



Hi 
Bachelor, by Clara Maynard Parker; 
Ochii.tr El 

35 Cents a Copy ; $4 oo a Year. 



Harper & Brother s.NewYork and London I 






January i, 189s. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS I.HTTKR 




JUDGE George A. Knight" is the war 



the papers making announcements 
of arrivals of distinguished people designate the noted San 
Franoisco lawyer, and he enjoys the distinction with be- 
coming dignity. Do coming events cast their shadows be- 
fore ? 

» * » 

Tlf Cat and Ou Cherub, verily, has nine lives. It has 
been killed numerous times, but no sooner had Frohman 
announced the demise of the First Burn than the Cat popped 
up serenely at Proctor's, where it is drawing very satis- 
factory audiences. It is a case of Manager William A. 
Brady m. Charles Frohman. and the former seems to take 
a fiendish delight in worrying his rival. Brady has as 
many irons in the fire as Frohman, and an almost inex- 
haustible fund of good humor. 

* * * 

It is reported on good authority that young Clarence H. 
Mackay. son of the Bonanza King, has suddenly determined 
to make a name for himself, and entered actively in his 
father's business, following in the footsteps of his lamented 
brother. Mr. Mackay has already made his son a co- 
director in all his telegraph companies and in the powder 
concerns as well, so that the young izan will start in with 
a liberal allowance in lieu of salary. His brother had de- 
veloped quite an aptitude for corporation business, and it 
looks as if Clarence would follow suit. Mr. Mackay Sr. is 
delighted with Clarence's new departure. 

* * # 

Now that his wife's condition is so much improved, Her- 
mann Oelriehs has resumed his exploring of Greater New 
York territory on his wheel. There is no sport of which 
he is so fond as to mount his silent steed, and with some 
congenial companion take a spin of forty or fifty miles be- 
fore stopping for refreshments. His reminiscences of 
wheeling in San Francisco during his long stay there this 
year are most pleasant. He says : "A run out to the 
Cliff and back of an early morning would bring on an ap- 
petite as keen as a razor — it is a glorious climate ! " 

* * * 

When did good-natured Joe H. Hoadley, son of old Milo 
Hoadley, a son of the Golden West, become an "ex-Gov- 
ernor " ? Joe came here a number of years ago with a 
newspaper slot machine, from which he expected big 
things. He dropped that and turned his inventive genius 
to machinery, and now he is supervising engineer of a 
number of Cramp's steamship companies, besides being 
the inventor of a system of compressed air for power. One 
of the News Letter's contemporaries publishes a letter 
from Joe and entitles him ex-Governor Hoadley. There is 
an ex-Governor George Hoadley of Ohio in New York, but 
he is not our " Joe " who writes the letter concerning the 
Cramp steamships that will engage in the Alaskan trade. 

* # * 

The Journal is the special organ of the so-called New 
York Mining Exchange. In Wednesday's issue its report 
of alleged transactions is headed in black letter type, 
" Mining Shares Boom ! Justine Continues in the Lead 1 " 
Then follows: "The mining market yesterday was in- 
fluenced largely by the strength and activity in Justine, 
which, under dealings in 127.000 shares, rose to 2 cents 
per share, after selling at $2.25 per thousand early last 
week. Toward the close of the market, with the cessation 
of buying by the shorts to cover their contracts, the price 
declined to .011." If any of your Pine-street mudhens 
come on they will find a few seats in the Board for sale 

cheap for cash. 

* * * 

It wasn't the sensational Yellow Journal that married 
James B. Haggin to his dead wife's niece, Miss Voorhies, 
last week, but the would-be reliable Herald, which has of 
late vied with its contemporaries in denying the stories 
told by it the day before. Ever since its reverend editor 
went to Armenia the Herald has been singularly shy of the 
truth. 



Judge Alonzo C. Munson, now President of the old 
Knickerbocker Club, who was one of the early argonauts, 
settling in Sacramento, introduced a handsome young 
grand-daughter to society last week. The Judge must be 
waxing old, but he trips through the dance with all the 
easy grace of a young gallant. 
* * * 

Miss Maud Berry Fisher made her Nsw York appear- 
ance at the Garden Theatre Monday evening of last week, 
singing the role of Siebel in Faust with considerable suc- 
cess, specially in her rendition of the Flower song, which 
was encored with genuine enthusiasm. Her friends are 
in hopes of seeing her in some more important part. 
Merry Christmas ! 

Neio York, December ^1,1897. Enthe Notrs. ' 

"Cock o' the North ! ' 
first-class dealers. 



Watson's Scotch Whiskey. Sold by all 



Shirt Waist Buttons, Silver Links, and other novelties in sterling 
silver at J. N. Brittaln's, watchmaker and Jeweler. 2'i Geary street. 



Shake Into Your Shoes 



Allen's Foot-Ease, a Powder for the 
feet. It cures painful, swollen, smarting feet, and instantly takes the 
sting out of corns and bunions. It's the greatest comfort discovery of the 
a re. Allen's Foot-Ease makes tight fitting or new shoes feel easy. It is 
a certain cure for sweating, callous, and hot, tired, aching feet. Try it 
to day Sold by all druggists and shoe stores. Bv mail for 25c in stamps. 
Trial package FREE. Address, Allen S. Olmsted, Le Roy, N. Y. 



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ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Alta Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco. Cal. Location 
of works— Gold Hill, Gold Hill Mining District, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notioe is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the third day of December, 1897, an assessment. No. 58. of Ten cents 
(10 cts.) per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately in United States gold coin to the Secretary, at the 
office of the company, room 33, Nevada Block, 303 Montgomery street, San 
Francisco, Cal. ,_ „ 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
7th DAY OF JANUARY, 1898, 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction; and, unless 
payment is made before, will be sold on FRIDAY, the 28th day of January, 
1898, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of ad- 
vertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

J. E. JACOBUS. Seo.-etary. 

Office: Room 33, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January i, 1898. 




^e obey no wand but pleasure's."— Tom Moore, 



M 1 



R. Augustus Thomas was obviously 
hampered by an unwholesome fear of 
his audience when he wrote The Juckline. 
As he acknowledges suggestions only from 
Opie Read's book, he is under no obliga- 
tion to follow the story, and his unkind 
trick is his own responsibility. For it is a trick to lead 
one into the heart of a human tragedy, to work upon one's 
feelings with such genuine pathos, to characterize every 
member of an humble stricken family with unerring observa- 
tion, and to tell their story with vivid dramatic power, — 
and then to cast bis artistic responsibilities to the winds 
by a last act of irritating complacency and conventional 
stage morality, in order that his people may all get mar- 
ried and live happily ever after. The core of the story is 
Alf Jucklin's snooting Dan Stuart, and his subsequent 
trial for murder. He shoots with intent to kill; the insult 
he has received is insufficient from any point of view, but 
it is not unbelievable that a hot-headed, ignorant youth 
would take such unreasonable revenge, — these things hap- 
pen all the time, — and it is no satisfaction to learn at last 
that the bullet didn't actually kill his victim, but merely 
grazed his breast, making a flesh wound which misled the 
jury, and that heart disease was the cause of death. Alf 
is still a moral murderer, and whether he is an actual one 
or not is really unimportant. He is not justified, but 
white-washed by the accident. Tncks like this and the 
one by which they all get rich at the last moment are un- 
worthy of such an artist as Mr. Thomas can be if he 
chooses: they should be left to the hack play-makers. 

Tlte Juckline is very unequal in weight. The tragic ele- 
ment in the play is rather rudely introduced, but there are 
several scenes of strong human interest before the ab- 
sorbing scene outside the courtroom which occupies the 
third act. There is no modern playwright, English or 
American, who depicts simple rural types with so much 
sympathy and insight as Mr. Thomas. One needs not to be 
high-born or low-born, or American, or anything but 
human to understand them, and they are so interesting 
that it is quite unnecessary for him to make such flagrant 
concessions to stage conventions in working out his plots. 
There is none of the mawkish sentiment of The JJoosier 
Doctor in the cracked little farmer, Lemuel Jucklin. The 
character is true and appealing after one has grasped its 
meaning, but Mr. Thomas has erred in not making his in- 
tention sufficiently clear; there is a puzzling uncertainty 
about it, and it is not until the third act that it is thor- 
oughly understood. Mr. Stuart Robson plays the part 
with the quaint quietness it requires. He realizes its 
pathos without flinging it at you. The rest of the com- 
pany are generally capable, and play with the sincerity 
which Mr. Thomas's characters demand. Only Mr. Thos. 
A. Wise, as Sheriff Parker, shows farcical inclinations, 
and he has the most temptation. Mr. John Webster Jr., 
and Mr. Harrison Armstrong are both good as the young 
farmers; Mr. Armstrong in particular plays with a truth 
to nature which is comic and convincing. The women's 
parts are less than the men's. Mrs. Robson has only to 
be pleasant, which she is easily; the two girls are unim- 
portant; Mrs. Samuel Charles acts the part of Mrs. Juck- 
lin very genuinely, her modest and faithful performance 
does much towards gaining the tremendously realistic 
effect of the third act. This effect is not helped but cheap- 
ened by an exasperating orchestral accompaniment — and 
the Cavalleria intcrmezzoof all thin:. 
# # • 

The Frawleys are quite at their best in .1/. International 
Match, another Daily adaptation from the German, made 
to exploit the personalities of Mr. Drew and Miss Rehan. 
They play with more warmth and interest than often. Mr. 
Worthing, in the Drew part, has the kind of character 
to which he is too well accustomed, and plays it with his 
usual ease and finish. Miss Bates has something rather 
different from the usual Rehan part in Doris, an ingenue 



with curls. She does some of her best comedy work in it. 
All through she plays with a charming naturalness and an 
evident and contagious enjoyment. Mr. Herbert Carr is 
amusing as the pompous old fool, Sir John Smyth-Chum- 
ley, and would not lose in effect if he exaggerated a trifle 
less. Quincy Caramel is quite in Mr. Corson Clarke's vein. 
The story is nought but the characters are entertaining. 

* * * 

I have only seen fragments of -W Gay Coney Island, but 
if the rest of the piece is as amusing as what I saw, I can 
readily understand its popularity. There is a wit aud 
spirit about it which is generally absent from such shows. 
It is not. the champagne sparkle, but something of a bar- 
room quality. There is plenty of repartee, which no one 
need be at all ashamed to laugh at, and some good me- 
chanical jokes. Sherrie Matthews and Harry Bulger, the 
twin stars of the cast, are smart farceurs. Jane Whit- 
beck does general soubrette business with some grace and 
a good deal of zest, and most of the rest of the cast and 
all of the scenery are quite good enough. 

* # * 

Mr. Peter Robertson says, Mather Goo.se is not the English 
pantomime. I congratulate the Tivoli that it isn't. It is 
a kind of imitation of one, but in spite of its demons, un- 
dressed ballets and the like, and a modest little tipsy 
scene, it has an air of imperishable innocence, — it reminds 
me Irresistibly of a teetotal drink. There are scenes of 
eyeblinking brilliance, and some little white bears quite 
suitable to Christmas and childhood. Mr. Stevens is funny 
as Mother Goose, much funnier than his songs and his 
jokes, which are simple things, and Miss Edith Hall has 
just the right idea, but little opportunity to exploit it, — 
her costumes are admirable, — that green peak hat a flash 
of inspiration. Mr. Leary's comic light is quite bebusheled, 
for no one has much chance besides Mr. Stevens. If the 
children don't like Mother Goose it is their own fault; it is 
just what they ought to like. 

* * * 

The ballet at the Orpheum is very elaborate, and the 
scene at the bottcm of the sea, done behind a curtain of 
gauze, succeeds in catching something of the beauty and 
fairy tile charm which makes a ballet worth while as a 
form of art. The last scene is too garish and crude in 
color and design. There is more evidence of lavish ex- 
penditure than sense of beauty. I could conceive of a 
ballet which should be a very midsummer night's dream of 
loveliness, and express more perfectly than any poem the 
imaginations of a child, but it would have more mystery 
and less tinsel than this. 

The limitations of the Alcazar stage somewhat inter- 
fere with the full effect which the stock company could 
make in The Girl 1 Left Behind Me; but for all that, and 
in spite of several individual performances of unusual un- 
intelligence, they give an interesting performance, staged 
with unaccustomed elaboration. Miss Gertrude Foster 
again proves herself a capable handler of emotional roles, 
and shows a steady improvement in her method; several 
of the others do fair work. The Alcazar is evidently going 
ahead under Mr. Paulding's management. On Monday 
night Forbidden Fruit, by Dion Boucicault, will be pro- 
duced. 

At the Baldwin next week. Mr. Stuart Robson and his 
company will play Bronson Howard's The Henrietta, with 
which their names have been so long associated. On Jan- 
uary 10th The Man From Mexico, du Souchet's farce, will 
be produced. 

The Frawleys close their two weeks' season at the Cali- 
fornia on Sunday night with a performance of An Inter- 
national Match. On Thursday and Friday evening and 
Saturday afternoon next week, Miss Villa Whitney White 
will give "song and lecture recitals." Her subjects are all 
interesting and treat of the development of song. 

At Gay Coney Islam] will continue at the Columbia until 
the end of next week, when Miss Nellie McHenry opens an 
engagement in .1 Night in New York. 

Mother Goose will continue until further notice at the 
Tivoli, and is preparing a second edition of herself. 

Ayres' Business College, 82S Montgomery. Individual instruction, 
shorthand, typewriting, bookkeeping, telegraphy; lite scholarship, 850; 
low rates per week and month ; day ; evening. Send for catalogue. 



January I, 1898. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



PAUL MASSON'S WINES. 



TO Paul Masson. who owns an extensive vineyard in 
Santa Clara Valley, belongs the enduring credit of 
having demonstrated the fact that California soil and Cali- 
fornia grapes can produce a really splendid champagne. 
Masson came to California from a wine-growing country — 
Burgundy— adjoining the Province of Champagne. He 
had wide experience in the manufacture of champagne 
before he came to this coast, about eighteen years ago. 
He investigated the soil and climate of the Santa Clara 
Valley, and believing that an excellent quality of wine cou'd 
be manufactured from grapes grown there, undertook the 
work that has been in all ways successful. In 1SS4 the 
first wines were made, and in 1887, allowing three years 
for maturing, they were put on the market. The quality 
of this champagne created genuine surprise, for connois- 
seurs and wine drinkers generally were compelled to ad- 
mit that a fine champagne could be made in California as 
well as in France. 

Since that time the sale of Masson's champagnes has 
steadily grown. More than half a million bottles of this 
wine are made every year, and now it is difficult to keep 
up with the market. The Masson wines have won recog- 
nition abroad as well as at home. They have been chosen 
by Hermann Oelrichs for the great trans-Atlantic lines 
for which he is the New York agent, over all others ; and the 
Spreckels' Australian vessels have selected them against 
other brands. 

One remarkable feature of Masson's wines is their even- 
ness. This is the result of careful treatment of the grapes 
and the skill in manufacture. There is but one quality of 
champagne made by him — no second or third grade 
squeezed out of the grapes once used, as is the case in 
Prance. The most expert wine-makers are employed by 
Mr. Masson, and down to the minutest detail the utmost 
care and scientific treatment is received. As a conse- 
quence, the grade is equal and even, and the effect most 
satisfactory. 

Paul Masson's "Special Dry" and "Extra Dry" are 
prime favorites, and are recognized as containing all the 
exhilarating and delightful effects of the highest-priced 
champagnes, and at a much less cost. He has made a 
success of his wines, and has built up a large and pros- 
perous business on merit. 

THE center of attraction for buyers of jewelry for the 
holidays is Nat Raphael's, 124 Kearny street. Mr. 
Raphael has been so long in the business that he knows 
just what San Francisco buyers want. His line of dia- 
monds, rubies, sapphires, emeralds, pearls, fine watches, 
and the thousand beautiful things that are appropriate 
for the season. Raphael is a direct importer of precious 
stones, and makes his selections from the standpoint of a 
connoisseur. Exquisite rings, necklaces, bracelets, — in 
fact, a store filled with artistic creations of the artisan's 
craft, attract the admiration of the buyer, and Raphael's 
is literally ablaze with beautiful things, and every article 
sold by him is guaranteed. 

GOLDSTEIN & Cohn, at 822 Market street, are the 
leading manufacturers of wigs, switches, and curls 
in the city. Ladies' hair-dressing is done in the very latest 
style, and ladies' and children's hair-cutting is also done 
by them. The firm also import gloves, and do a large 
business in this line. Goldstein & Cohn have been in busi- 
ness in the city a long time, and their work is first-class, 
their entire stock fresh and reliable. 



Nickel Plate — West Shore Fitohburg Route. 
The popular low-rate short line between Chicago and Buffalo, New 
York, Boston, and other Eastern cities. Three elegantly-equipped, 
vestibuled trains daily ; Wagner sleeping cars and Nickel Plate Din- 
ing Cars. No change of cars Chicago to New York, or Chicago to 
Boston. For particulars, address B. F. Horner, G. P. andT. A., Cleve- 
land, 0.; J. Y. Calahan, G. A., Ill Adams street, Chicago. 111., or 
Jay W. Adams, P. C. P. A., 37 Crocker Building. San Francisco, Cal. 

The Christmas time has been especially bright at Swain's, 213 
Sutter street, where all the delicacies of the season have been served 
at a (able d'hote dinner from 5 to 8 every day for one dollar. A 
splendid restaurant, with unequaled service, excellent menu, and all 
the surroundings refined. Orders for confectionery and pastry of 
all kinds, candies, etc., promptly filled at shortest notice. 




VICI 



leather 
Dressing 



Is prepared In the largest leather factory In 
the world by the mukers of VlcI Kid— the 
most noted leather in the world. It gives a 
shoe a bright and lasting lustre, makes itsoft 
and pliable, keeps It from cracking In wet 
and dry weather. Tbe constant use of Vicl 
Dressinffmeansa saving In shoe leather 
which tbe student of economy can't over- 
look. Ask the dealer for it An illustrated 
book, telling how to care for shoes and in- 
crease their wear, mailed free, 
N ROBERT II. POERDEREB, PhlkdelpUm, Ffe. ' 



Baldwin Theatre- 



al, Hayman & Co., (Incorporated 
Proprietors 

To-night, THE eJUGKLINS. 

Monday. January 3d— Second and last week of Stuart Robson in 

Bronson Howard's 

THE HENRIETTA. 

Monday, January 10th-T HE MAN FROM MEXICO. 

n 1 rr'i 1 Fred Belasco, Lessee and Proprietor. 

ttlCaZar I heatre. Mark Than, Manager. PhoneMain354. 



Monday, January 3d. A laugh in every line. 
Dion Boucicault's celebrated farce, 



-It is the best.' 



FORBIDDEN FRUIT. 



"Charge'it to Buster." 
Only matinee Saturday. 



San Pranolsco's Greatest Music Hall. C 
street, between Stockton and Powells treets. 



Orpheum. 

Week commencing Monday. January 3d, 

MLLE. PATRICE. 

Assisted by Alt Hampton and J. F. Whetbeck, in their comedy 
Bketch, "A New Year's Dream." Parnum Brothers. Novelty 
Acrobats; Kitty Mitchell, Dancing Soubrette; Fred Brown, 
Bag Time Dancer: Elinore Sisters, character comediennes; the 
3 A volos, Novelty Acrobats; Mile. Rombelli, Sand Paintress; 
Musical Dall, Campanologist; the Ballet Spectacle, "The Birth 
of the Pearl"; new music, new dances. 

Reserved seats, 25c; balcony. 10c; opera chairs and box seats, 
50c; Matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday. Matinee 
Prices: Parquet, any seat, 2ic; balcony, any seat, 10c; chil- 
dren, 10c, any part. 

Ti \t r\ m mbs. Ernestine Kreling. 

IVOM UDera rlOUSe. Proprietor and Manager 



Every evening. The triumph of '97, 
Our holiday speciaole, 



The proper thing for '98. 



MOTHER GOOSE. 



Or " The Strange Adventures of Jack and Jill." Great oast; 
superb specialties; grand ballets; gorgeous scenery; startling 
electric effects, Concluding with the magnificent transforma- 
tion. "Our Childhood's Fancies." A treat for young and old. 
A Happy New Year to all ! 
PopularPrices 



. 35o and 500 



Pacific Goast dockey Glub (mgieside Track). 

Racing from Monday, December 27th, to Saturday, January 
9th, inclusive, 

FIVE OR MORE RAGES DAILY, 

Rain or shine. First race at 2 p. m. S. P R. R. trains 12:45 and 
1:15 p. m daily. Leave Third street station, stopping at Valen- 
cia street. Returning immediately after the races. Electric 
car lines— Kearny street and Mission street cars every three 
minutes, direct to track, without change. Fillmore-St. cars - 
transfer each way. 
F. H. Green, Secretary. S. N. Androus, President. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January I, 189S. 



LIGFIT5 AND 5FIADE5 
OF A MODEL'S LIFE. 



BY I.. D. VE.NTIRA, 

WHEN I first met him, Mario was an old man, with 
white beard flowing on his breast and long white hair, 
which fell like a rain of silver threads on his shoulders — 
covering half of a soiled and ragged velvet jacket. 

In the lane of "La Scalaccia" where he used to go to 
sleep, in a damp, dark and filthy yard, they called him the 
"magician," and when at night he returned to his den. 
dragging his wornout shoes on the pavement, the merry 
wives of the neighborhood went to meet him and ask three 
numbers for the lottery. 

Poor Mario! He did not nibble a stem of lettuce for 
breakfast nor drag wornout shoes on the pavement in 
those good old days when, on the platform of the academy, 
under the yellow light of the lamps, the muscles of his 
strong thorax swelled amidst the admiration of the 
artists, as he bent his body to impersonate the "Dying 
Gr&ul" or the Discobulo! when with inflated nostrils, shin- 
ing eyes and iron-muscled limbs, he posed as Horatius at 
the bridge, or Scevola at the pyre! 

At that time Mario was not disposed to pose in the at- 
titude of a commonplace subject, but loved heroic atti- 
tudes — attitudes as he used to say that gave him life to 
movement! Then! 

Bat when I knew him, Mario— plunged to the eyes in 
poverty — hardly recollected the old days, except when he 
passed under the large windows of the "Hall of the Nude" 
of the Academy. 

Then how his parchment face would light up; how his 
eyes sparkled under the heavy coarse brows! But it was 
only a flash, for suddenly his white head would fall again 
on his breast, and grasping his beard with trembling hand, 
he would move on, grumbling: "Art is gone! Art is gone!" 

He had an abundance of anecdotes about the poor King 
Louis of Bavaria, for whom he had posed many times — 
that curious type of king, who used to come to Rome in 
the winter time to live the life of an artist; up in the 
studio of Porta Pinciana in the morning, at the Cafe 
Greco in the afternoon, and at night in a tavern of the 
Piazza Montanara, where, over a square of fried Polenta 
and a flask of wine of Li Castelli, he recited his epigrams 
to his friends the German artists. 

Mario had known King Louis intimately, and often told 
tales of the love of the artist king and "la Scandriglia," a 
young and pretty washerwoman who had bewitched the 
king with her lustrous eyes. 

Mario in his youth had been a woodcutter. One fine 
day, tired of work, he had thrown himself on the ground 
and had fallen asleep. His open shirt displayed a brown 
and muscular chest; his head, solidly planied on its neck, 
was thrown back; in this attitude the woodcutter looked 
Jike a gladiator at rest after the labors of the circus. 

A German artist who chanced to pass, startled by the 
perfection of the sleeper's physique, approached and 
awoke him. 

The next day Mario, instead of going to the wood, 
climbed the stairs that led to the studio of the German 
artist in the Via Sistina. 

When Mario entered the large hall of the studio, the 
painter, standing on a ladder before a long canvas, was 
working with a chalk, the outlines of a Bacchante. 

Below, in the background on a platform, stood a girl, 
naked, immobile, statue-like, holding in her upraised hand 
a cup of gilded wood— a tiger skin tied across her breast 
and small branches of green ivy entwined in her long black 
hair which fell in disorder over her white shoulders. "Under 
a large window in the penumbra crouched an old Ciociara 
knitting and whining, sotto voce, a folk-lore song. 

Mario waited, nervously fingering his battered hat 
looking on with wide-open eyes. Finally the painter threw' 
down the stub of chalk, came down from the ladder and 
approaching the woodcutter, said: "Young man. undress 
yourself!" 

Mario flushed and looked askance toward the model and 
the old woman who were laughing at his embarrassment. 



"Courage, young man," exclaimed the painter, with a 
smile. 

Mario, abashed, blushing and confused, slowly took off 
his jacket — then the waistcoat, and finally, with a nervous 
impetus, threw off his shirt; thus standing before the 
painter who regarded him while slowly stroking his long 
mustaches. 

"Superb," exclaimed the German. "Magnificent!" 
Eagerly he ordered Mario to ascend the platform where 
he posed him tor an immediate sketch. 

After a few weeks Mario could not find the time to 
gratify all the painters who wished to employ him. 

One day he disappeared from Rome. In the halls of the 
academy, in the studios, all sorts of stories were in circu- 
lation. 

Some said that he had committed suicide, some alleged 
that another model, jealous of his success, had strangled 
him aud thrown him into a well; others, with a wink of the 
eye, whispered the name of a Polish grande dame; and 
some declared that a Russian gentleman — a multi-million- 
aire, who had a passion for everything artistic — had taken 
Mario abroad. 

After many years, when everyone had forgotten the 
strange adventure, there arrived in Rome a handsome 
man of some fifty years of age, wearing a beautiful grey 
beard and with fingers covered with costly rings, who, 
smoking choice Havanas, visited the studios in search of 
pictures. 

Some affirmed that the Russian dilettante, who spoke 
French badly, was no other than Mario, the model. 

Bolder ones asked the Russian if he knew of a certain 
model who lived the life of a grande seigneur in that coun- 
try. 

But the dilettante answered that he did not know him. 
"Besides," he used to say, "Russia is a great country." 

Yet it happened that the Russian gentleman having 
seen in the studio of an old artist, the sketch of an Ajax, 
asked the price and bought it. 

The Ajax was the nude of Mario the model. 

In July, 74, Mario came back to Rome, bankrupt, aged 
and infirm. Nobody paid any attention to him. Only now 
and then some one would stop to observe the eccentric 
figure of the old model. 

As long as he had a few pennies in his pocket, he went 
during the long summer hours, up the Via Degla Artisti 
to a tavern where the models used to congregate to gam- 
ble the earnings of the day. 

When the money was gone, Mario went straight to the 
Academy to ask for work. When he entered the hall was 
full of students, and as the last pose was just finished, he 
was accepted immediately, and mounting the platform 
crossed his arms and waited. 

"Pose!" exclaimed the students from the benches. 

Mario felt the hot blood rush to bis face; for a moment a 
quick wave of life flowed through his veins and he at- 
tempted the action of the fighter — expanded his chest, 
clenched his fists and remained immobile. 

Down on the benches they laughed at the contorted ac- 
tion of the old man. Mario leaned back against the wall 
to rest — then with heavy breathing came forward and 
tried the action of the Discobulo, then that of the Gladiator. 

From the benches came fresh laughter and protestations 
that it was impossible to study from such attitudes. 
Mario tried hard to find new poses. Finally several young 
men came forward, put the old man straight and stiff with 
his arms hanging at his side and went back to the benches. 

" Gentlemen, the pose is ready," exclaimed the attend- 
ant. 

The students took their places and silently began to 
sketch. 

Mario, with livid face and broken heart, stood thereon 
the platform, meaningless as a log. He thought of the 
bygone years and could not realize why the fighter, the 
action which in those days had achieved his fame was now 
a failure. His brain was in a whirl, his heart ached, he 
felt flames rising to his face, the light blinded him, he be- 



All the Japanese curios one can imagine are to be found at 
Marsh & Co. 'sat 025 Market, under the Palace hotel. Mr. Marsh 
has just returned from Japan and he brought over a splendid as- 
sortment of tapestries, carvings, etc.. for which the dainty skill of 
the Japanese is noied. .lust the things for Christina*. 



N»w« Latter. 



[9] 



J»nu«.y I, 1898. 




The "Monterey" at Full Speed on her Trial Trip. 
Jweloe-inch Guns Betsy and Alice. 




STABLE PETS. 

From the Painting by G. Qtmdrone. 



6. F. News Letter. 



[in 



January 1, 1898. 




AN ALLEY IN CHINATOWN, SAN FRANCISCO. 
Drawn for the News Letter by Jay 0. Brubaker. 



January t, 1898. 



SAN PRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



rame white, made a step backward, reeled and fell like a 
rair to the platform. 

After this Mario went here and there among the studios 
to beg for work, but with the exception of a few hours 
of posing in the studio of a painter nicknamed the "Indian" 
because his pictures represented chietlv the slaughtering 
of missionaries, which he sent to India, and a few sittings 
in the garret of a young man who was painting a Garibaldi 
for the city hall of his native town, he found nothing. 

One evening Mario walked in the street. A group of 
urchins screamed after him and an old woman's shoe 
whistled past his head. Mario came back flushed and 
trembling, scattered the urchins, then seizing his beard, 
and with his head bent on his breast he went over to the 
bridge of Quattro Capi. He leaned over the parapet and 
remained there looking intently into the muddy water of 
the river, which ran under the dark arcades of the bridge, 
gurgliDg and foaming. 

The urchins from afar jeered at him and a rain of cab- 
bages fell on his head. Then a veil fell over his eyes — he 
felt the ground slipping from under him, he grasped at a 
lamp post — and gliding over the parapet — disappeared. 
***** 

When Beppo, the boatman, picked up Mario's old slouch 
hat, the urchins looked on curiously. 

The following day, at the Cafe Greco, every one was 
discussing the death of Mario. A young man, with a 
pointed beard, who was idiy cutting on the marble table 
the outlines of the figure of a woman, was shocked at the 
story of the end of the poor model. 

" Mario is dead,'' whispered another, "but a thousand 
times better death than to drag through life in that man- 
ner. " 

His companion did not answer, but when he went out 
leaning on the arm of a friend, he was heard to say: 
"There are people who have no luck. I am one of them 
for I had just found a model who was willing to pose for 
ten cents a day!" 

THE Singer. Sewing Machine Company has made a 
unique offer to the public. It proposes to give one 
hundred of its latest and most improved machines in equal 
exchange for one hundred of the oldest sewing machines, 
of any make, now in family use in the United States. The 
award is to be determined from the list of applicants sent 
to the Company's head office in New York City before 
March 1, 1898. There is nothing to do beyond sending a 
postal card, stating the age of the machine. The one hun- 
dred oldest get the prize — that is, the exchange of a brand 
new Singer for the old, worn-out machine. For further 
particulars (if they are wanted), apply to any Singer 
Manufacturing agency. 

Cut Glass is the proper thing for the holidays. Our new crystal 
room, said to be the finest in America, shows a superb cut glass 
stock— just the thing for Christmas gifts. We are sole agents for 
Libby Cut Glass. Open evenings. Nathan, Dohemann & Co., 122- 
132 Sutter street. 

The brightest and most fashionable neckwear and collars, shirts, 
cuffs and gloves for gentlemen are found at Carmany's 25 Kearny 
street. 



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IS YOUR 

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1S5-127 SansomeSt., S. F. 

Jobbing Agents for Pacific Coast. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January I, 1898. 



RESIDE/NCE OF 
51R CLAU5 SPRECKELS. 



THE completion of his splendid mansion by Mr. Claus 
Spreckels, on the corner of Van Ness avenue and Clay 
street, marks a distinct advance in domestic architectural 
design in this city. The sub-structure for this residence 
was laid about two years and a half ago, and since that 
time until Mr. Spreckels occupied it last month, work was 
steadily 1 prosecuted. The mansion is built of Arizona sand- 
stone, and as the photographed reproduction shows, the 
exterior of this palatial home is marked by magnificent 
strength and architectural beauty. 

The Spreckels residence occupies 120 feet on the avenue 
and 100 feet on Clay street. Its principal front faces the ris- 
ing sun, and the mansion is entered through a doorway of re- 
markable artistic design, whose general effect gracefully ex- 
teuds to the roof. A broad vestibule opens upon a splendid 
hall, and in this grand room are to be found the highest de- 
velopment and most refined effort of the architects and 
decorators art. The hall is 2H feet in width and forty- 
eight feet long; it is divided by gleaming columns of mar- 
ble and its floors are artistic mosaic. The wainscoting is 
composed of Algerian marble, profusely decorated in the 
style of the Renaissance, and the walls are hidden by rich 
French tapestries. Above the hall runs a second floor or 
balcony, railed in red marble and sweeping away into pro- 
jecting alcoves. From the floor of this main hall to the 
art glass roof is a distance of thirty-four feet; and through 
this beautiful covering a clear yet mellow light falls softly 
upon the polished marble, mosaic ground, and tapestried 
walls. The drawing room, planned upon the same ample 
plan, is twenty-four feet wide and twenty-two feet in 
length; its form artistically broken by the circular curve 
of the round tower that springs above it. 

The library is finished in rare Hawaiian woods, and the 
literary atmosphere of the room accented by panel por- 
traits of Longfellow, Shakespeare, Goethe, and Schiller, 
that adorn the ceiling. The dining room is another splen- 
did apartment, furnished in polished mahogany and highly 
ornamented. Green silk adorns the walls, and the curtain 
drapings, and painting form a harmonious and most pleas- 
ing color combination. 

On the second floor are the apartments of Mr. and Mrs. 
Spreckels — elegantly appointed, embellished with rarest 
taste, and fitted with every luxury that observation and 
experience could suggest. On this floor are other suites, 
all finished in magnificent style. On the third floor is a 
picture gallery, surrounded by elegant suites of apart- 
ments, and here the walls are to be embellished by the 
treasures of the painter's brush that are to be gathered 
from the famous art centers of the world. The arrange- 
ments for lavish entertaining are perfect, and every con- 
venience and elegance that the most refined taste and 
limitless wealth can procure may be found in the Spreckels 
home. Grace has not been sacrificed to strength, nor 
happy combination of color effects to either. The union 
ol all these features are remarkably blended and joined 
together in this most modern mansion in the city, and In- 
dicate throughout a rare discrimination and cultivated 
purpose; and the highest development of the architect's, 
decorator's, and furnisher's art find expression here. 

The architects for this magnificent home are Reid Bros., 
with offices in the Claus Spreckels building at the corner 
of Third and Market streets, which structure was also 
planned by them. 

There is no department of house build- 
Hoibrook, Merrill ing more essential than the sanitary 
& Stetson arrangements, and in this splendid 

residence the greatest care and pains 
have been taken to obtain the latest and most scientifically 
correct results. This work was entrusted to the firm of 
Holbrook, Merrill & Stetson, and is in every respect com- 
pleted in the most substantial and at the same time ele- 
gant manner. The heaviest and most expensive materials 
were used throughout the building, and from the most im- 
portant to the minutest detail the work was finished in a 



manner ensuring the greatest convenience and most ele- 
gant appearance. The connections for hot and cold water 
supply are all brass, one and one-half, two and one-half, and 
three inches in diameter, and tested up to 300 pounds pres- 
sure; and all fixtures have separate waste and vent pipes. In 
all the family rooms all the trimmings are finished with rich 
gold platings. Under an especial arrangement it is impos- 
sible to turn on the hot water in the bath'tubs first. Upon 
opening the cocks the cold water flows, thus preventing 
the possibility of accident. The plumbing in the Spreckels 
residence is the most elaborate and intricate ever put into 
a building on the Pacific Coast. That it was done by this 
firm is a compliment to the great facilities and finished 
workmanship turned out by Holbrook, Merrill & Stetson. 

The interior tiling and mosaic in the 
Montague & Co. building, done by Montague & Co., 
form a most elaborate and beautiful 
exhibition of this style of art work. The eight bath rooms 
are tiled with English and American tiling, and the four 
main bathrooms have ceilings, walls, and floors made of 
specially designed and decorated tiling. The prevailing 
tints and colors are ivory and gold, pale pink and pale 
blue. The floors of the bathroom are marble mosaic, and 
in style corresponding to the general design of the frieze 
and ceiling. The kitchen is finished in ivory enameled tile, 
of blue tint, as are the pantry, servants' room, dining 
room, etc. The tile work throughout is the result of a 
trip to Eastern factories by a representative of Montague 
& Co., and the material was chosen with the utmost care. 
The vestibules and stair landings are all finished in foreign 
marble mosaic, worked out in rare and foliated designs. 
This firm may be congratulated on the high character of 
the tiling and mosaic work done, as it is most artistic and 
beautiful. 

The building, copings, steps, etc., 
McPhee Company, were constructed by the McPhee 
Company, of which Daniel McPhee is 
president and James Sutton secretary, with mill and yard 
at 1219 Market street, and box 256, Builders's Exchange, 
40 New Montgomery street. The steps are of polished Mis- 
souri granite, and are beautifully finished. This company is 
one of the largest concerns in the city, and in its yard may 
be found stone from every quarry in the State ; sandstone 
from Arizona and granite from Missouri. The firm has all 
the machinery necessary for prompt execution of all or- 
ders. The company has the very latest appliances for fill- 
ing all kinds of orders, from the largest to the least. The 
stonework on the Emma Spreckels building was done by 
the McPhee Company, and a large contract is now being 
filled on the new Hall of Justice by it. Promptness, 
thorough satisfaction, and reliable work at reasonable 
prices, are the claims of this company to public confidence. 

The well-known firm of Finck & 
Flnck & Schindier. Schindler, 1309-1315 Market street, 
manufacturers of artistic furniture 
and interior furnishings, did the main entrance, the doors, 
and vestibule finishing of the residence, as well as other 
interior work — all of which, completed in the most elab- 
orate and artistic manner, fully sustains the high reputa- 
tion of this old-established and reliable firm. 

George H. Tay The heating and ventilation of the house 
Comp.ny. is most perfect. Heat is produced by a 
low-pressure system of indirect steam 
radiation. The indirect radiators are hung from the base- 
ment ceiling, and consist of sixty-six separate stacks 
located at the base of warm-air flues leading to the differ- 
ent rooms throughout the building, each room having its 
separate flue. Each stack is encased in a heavy galvan- 
ized iron box, covered on the outside with magnesia block- 
covering. Each warm air flue is covered with the same 
material. Every stack box is provided with a damper, 
controlled by a Power's thermostat placed in the room 
heated by the stack. The temperature of each room is 
thus automatically controlled. The cold air to supply the 
indirect stacks is taken from the outside of the buildiDg 
some distance from the house. The air is taken at a height 
of about thirty-five feet from the ground, and then con- 
ducted to the building through a concrete tunnel about 
six feet square. This tunnel is branched at the building 
into two smaller tunnels, one supplying air to the north 



January I, 189S. 



SAN FRANCISCO XKWS LETTER. 



side of the buildiog. the other to the south side The air 
is distributed through the basement in terra cotta pipes 
buried in the sand. The indirect stacks are connected to 
-tern by heavy galvanized iron pipes. This 
system in the basement is entirely concealed, as all of the 
foundation walls adjacent to the heating system are made 
double and the stacks placed within them. 

To insure a perfect circulation of warm air throughout 
the building, each room is furnished with a galvanized iron 
air duct concealed in the wall, which is connected to an 
accelerating coil in the attic. 

A system of exhaust pipes for the first floor has been 
placed beneath the basement floorand connected to a cen- 
tral ventilating shaft. This has been constructed in such 
a manner that an exhaust fan, driven by an electric motor, 
can be placed at any future time for exhausting air from 
the first floor in large quantities, thus insuring a perfect 
ventilation on the occasion of any social gathering. 

The steam for the system is supplied by three Dunning 
Low-Pressure Magazine Boilers set in battery. Each 
boiler has a rating of eighteen horse power, and is con- 
trolled by an automatic damper set to work at ten pounds 
gauge pressure. The magazines for these boilers have 
each a capacitj' of one-half ton of coal, thus allowing the 
boilers to run twenty-four hours in the day, with very 
little attention. In the very coldest weather, two boilers 
only are required, the other boiler being used as a reserve. 
Besides supplying steam to the heating system, these boil- 
ers aiso supply steam for heating water and for laundry 
purposes. This work was done by the George H. Tay Com- 
pany, 49-53 First street. 

All the gas and electric fixtures 

Thomas Day Company, in the residence have been made 
in this city, and are the finest 
specimens of metal work which could be produced. They 
are made of bronze metal and finished in heavy gold gilt. 
The designs are those of the architects, and the workman- 
ship is the best that could be produced by the most skillful 
mechanics. Every detail is executed with the utmost care, 
and every line upon the fixtures carefully hand-chased. 
Several of the large fixtures represent the labor of many 
men for months, and the dining-room fixtures, the largest 
of all, occupied nearly a year of constant labor. Much 
credit is due to Mr. Spreckels and to the architects for 
placing their orders in this city, and in encouraging and 
building up the manufactories of the Pacific Coast for the 
best goods. Much credit is also due in this instance to the 
Thomas Day Company of this city, who manufactured 
these fixtures, for having produced a line of goods equal 
to the best productions of the great art centers of Europe. 
By means of such aid as they have been able to obtain 
from the friends of the home patronage theory, about a 
hundred hands are constantly employed in their large 
factory on Mission street, and fifty or more families are 
added to our population, spending their money in our 
midst. How much, better it would be for our city and our 
coast if all would follow Mr. Spreckels' example, and let 
their money circulate at home. 

The contract for the plumbing and gas 

w. F. Wilson, fitting was given to W. P. Wilson, 204 
Stockton street, and was done in the 
most finished and satisfactory manner. Neither labor 
nor expense were spared in filling this contract and the re- 
sult has shown conclusively that as fine work can be done 
in San Francisco as in any Eastern city. All the material 
employed was especially selected, and the system of drain- 
age, the salt water pipes, and in fact every part of this 
contract was carried out in a complete and workmanlike 
manner. The various systems are independent of one 
another, everything being controlled separately. There 
are 14 bathrooms all fitted up complete with modern 
sanitary fixtures, the bath tubs in the 5 principal bath 
rooms are of solid porcelain and of special original designs 
and shapes being made for this work only. Mr. Wilson 
has installed a system of sanitary plumbing in this resi- 
dence which for mechanical and artistic appearance can- 
not be excelled anywhere in this country. 

"Brown's Bronchial troches" are of great service in subduing 
Hoarseness and Coughs. Sold only in boxes. Avoid imitations. 



Mothers, be sure and use "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup " for your 
ohlldren while teething . 




. Mixture 

I Smokinq Tobacco ## 



Brooklyn 
Jfotel « ® 



Conducted on both the 

EUROPEAN AND 
AMERICAN PLAN. 

Bush Street, bet. Sansome and Montgomery, S. P 

This favorite hotel is under the management or 
Charles Montgomery, and is as good, if not the best, Familv and Busi 
ness Men's Hotel in San Francisco. Home comforts, cuisine unexcelled 
first-class service and the highest standard of respectability guaranteed 
Our rooms cannot be surpassed for neatness and comfort. 

Board and room- Per day, 81.25, $1.50, $1.75, and $2; per week, $7 to $13 
per month, $27.50 to $40; single room, 5Uc. to $1. 

-SWFree coach to and from the hotel. 



Motel Bella Vista 



1001 Pine street 



A First-class Hotel 



New York. 



The Bella Vista is the Pioneer 
First-class Family Hotel of 
San Francisco. All the com- 
forts of a modern residence. 

MKS. A F. TRACY 

Madison Square, Broadway and 23d 
Street. 



Under new management. Booms single or 
en suite. Restaurant unsurpassed. Ele- 
gant in all appointments at moderate 
prices. 

Reed & Roblee, Props. 
EUROPEAN PLAN. 



HOTEL 
BflRTflOLDI 

New York 



Occidental Hotel. 



A quiet home, centrally located, for 
those who appreolate comfort and 
attention. 



Wm B. Hooper, Manager. 



San Francisco 



RiQQS House, 



WASHINGTON, D. C 



THE HOTEL PAR EXCELLENCE" 

of the National Capital. First class in all 

appointments. 

An illustrated Rulde to Washington will be 

mailed free of charge, upon receipt of two 

2-oeDt stamps. 

0. G. STAPLES, Prop. 



DR. BYRON W. HAINES 
Dentist 

14 Grant Avenue 
Rooms 16-17-18-19 

Dr. FRANK C. PAGUE, 
Dentist 

Has removed nls offloe to the Spring Valley Water Works Building, Geary 
and Stookton streets, southeast corner, S. F. Rooms 3, 5, and 7. 



•4 



SAN" FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January I, 1898. 






^mBi&fflL 




9 *¥ 



Now that Maitland Kersey has re- 

A Duke Wanted signed from the White Star Com- 

For a Figurehead, pany's office in New York, it begins 

to iook as though there might be 
something in the story about that big Klondike explora- 
tion scheme, notwithstanding the vigorous denials of per- 
sons said to be connected with it. More especially so, 
that it is generally admitted that the Duke of Teck must 
now work for a living or trust to the tender mercies of his 
royal relatives in fireat Britain Speaking of the unfor- 
tunate plight of this estimable old gentleman, a writer in 
one of the big London weeklies remarks: "The future of 
the Duke of Teck is engaging the attention of the Royal 
Family. Must keep him out of the workhouse somehow, I 
suppose. Why don't one of your contemporaries start a 
shilling 'Teck fund'?" Sandwiched in as a guinea-pig 
director between members of a new American plutocracy, 
there should be no necessity for alms-giving of the kind. 
On the other hand, after the kindly treatment the Duke 
received from the British people, perhaps he might not 
care to pose as a bell-wether, leading a flock of them to 
pecuniary destruction in the quagmire of Klondike specu- 
lation, for the benefit of wire-pullers on thus side of the 
Atlantic. If so, what then? The name of H. R. H. the 
Duke of Teck would look big at the head of a prospectus, 
bigger even than the animated money-bags at his back, 
but the most they could pay for its use would prove inade- 
quate compensation for the ignoble intentions at the base 
of operations. 

The English papers are publishing a 
Bratnoner on the report accredited to Mr. Bratnober, 
Klondike. which was received by the London 

Exploration Company. It may inter- 
est some people here, who found the well known expert 
rather reticent when he dropped into town after his re- 
turn. He wrote from Dawson City as follows: "All the 
way from ten to twenty miles from this town, the placer 
mines are very rich in spots, and no doubt will produce a 
great deal of gold. The formation of the country where 
the gold is found is micacious schist and quartz, stringers 
running through this bed, one-half being schist and one- 
half being quartz. This is the bed and country rock, and 
I noticed that the rich diggings are to be found where the 
quartz predominates, and there is no doubt in mv mind the 
gold came out of this quartz, which is being worked for 
bed rock. I also note that, where the quartz does not 
appear, the schist is decomposed, making a soft bed- 
rock, which contains no gold whatever, and in this 
case the diggings fail to pay This causes a great 
many blanks, and miners who are unfortunate enough 
to get one of these claims cannot make it pay 
wages, while the adjoining claims may be very rich. 
Also, on Bonanza Creek, I found that they have coarse 
bed rock, which comes out in blocks of. say, 2 feet thick. 
This bed rock is a very unfavorable feature, and these 
claims are also poor. I remained in there nineteen days; 
prospected the principal mines, washing some of their best 
dirt, often getting very good prospects; sometimes they 
were very disappointing I tried very hard to do some 
business, but found it impossible at the prices asked for 
unprospected claims. This is the most interesting coun- 
try that I have traveled through, and, as I said before, 1 
believe there are many good gold mines to be developed 
there. I also found good quartz showing gold.'' 

During the first eleven months of 
Klondike Proved A 1KH7, the total capital actually of- 
Leading Attraction, fered for public subscription in Great 
Britain a^'regated £135,169,000, 
according to the Westminster, against £14H millions for 
the same period of 1896. The classification shows that, of 
the amouut, only some £1,438,000 is accredited to Ameri- 
can and Canadian Mines, while Klondike companies are 
set down for £1,686, 1. 



A well-known correspondent of a 
The Decay of prominent London journal, in review- 
Business Morality, ing the latter-day lapse of virtue in 

commercial and financial circles, 
says : "A company promoter, for instance, is never honest 
except by accident — 1. <•., if it pays him to be so. Any day 
will supply illustrations. There are plans for six railways 
to Klondike now before the public. The veriest fool knows 
that not more than two of them at the outside can pay. 
Well, they are not meant to pay — they are merely the 
bait with which the promoter lures the money out of the 
fool's pocket into his own. When the smash comes he is 
elsewhere. This is a typical case of his daily practice. 
Thief ! Mines which do not exist are floated persist- 
ently; businesses on the brink of ruin are sold for millions; 
worthless lands are valued at tens of thousands; all for 
the benefit of the licensed thief. There is no honor among 
these thieves either. They will cheat their dearest friends 
out of thousands, and violate the straightest agreement if 
only the law cannot touch them. They boom their swindles 
on the garments of charity, and make the Holy of Holies 
serve as their advertisement. These are the giant thieves. 
The directors are like unto them. Some neglect their 
duties and reap the spoil, and whine their innocence when 
caught, and accused of fraud. Thieves again! My own 
friend will try and make me put my money in his worth- 
less concern, and will sell me shares which he knows are 
not worth the paper they are written on. Do not imagine 
these are mere City men! My lord is a City man now — we 
are all City men." Thank ffod we have none of this class 
in San Francisco. 

The present condition of affairs cannot 
The Outlook last much longer on Pine street. Trade 
For Pine Street, is absolutely dead in the mining market, 
and that through sheer lack of attrac- 
tion. Attraction in this case means money. Without it 
the mare won't trot the pace on the Bourse, any more 
than elsewhere. All the bonanzas in the world will be 
passed over flat and unnoticed by the curb and outside 
dealers, unless the stock shows a lively connection with 
the improved conditions at the mine. Mere talk of ore 
discoveries avails naught with the stock flat and dead in 
the board room, or quoted below the value which the 
public would assign, when summing the speculative possi- 
bilities attendant on a strike of ore. When money makes 
its appearance on Pine street, and manipulation again 
becomes apparent, it will be time to forecast a lively 
market. Everything favors the advent of some clever 
manipulation. Stocks are well concentrated, and the 
great mass of the public is ready for a gamble. As for 
the mines, some of them can make a better showing than 
they have ever done in their history, excepting the big 
Bonanza mines. 

A Denver correspondent of a London 

Queer Situation in contemporary says: "Mr. T. A. 

Colorado. Riekard, an eminent mining engineer, 

has for some years past held the hon- 
orary position of State Geologist of Colorado, previously 
held by another British Mining Engineer, Mr. E. R. Le 
Neve Foster." Surely there must be a mistake here of 
some kind. While the gentlemen named may be British 
by birth, and mining engineers by profession, it cannot be 
possible that they retsiired their nationality while holding 
official positions in Colorado. An explanation of this seem- 
ingly complex situation would relieve symptoms of brain 
congestion over attempts to solve the conundrum. 

The annual meeting of the Grand Central 
Grand Central Mine was held in London on the 6th ult. 
of Mexieo. The statement of account, covering a 
period from August 1SU6 to August 1897, 
shows a net profit of £81,630 14s 9d, out of which an in- 
terim dividend of 2s per share, amounting to £25,000, has 
been paid, and a sum of £29,642 His 5d was spent on im- 
provements, leaving a balance of £27,087 18s 4d. Out of 
this the Directors decided to pay a final dividend for the 
year of Is per share, amounting to £12,900. Hamilton 
Smith and A. G. Brand joined the Board, filling vacancies 
created by retirement of two of the old Directors. The 
mine is said to be looking well again. 



WITH 8. F. NEWS LETTER 




Main Entrance. 



*Reid Bros , Architects. 



ARTISTIG HOMES f 

Residence of Sir Glaus Spreckels, Corner Uan ft 



JANUARY 1, 1898. 




: CALIFORNIA. 

Avenue and Glay Street, Sar\ Francisco. 



Sir Glaus Spreckels. 



A 



January I, 189S. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS l.l.TTKK 



'5 




"He»r the Crier:" "IVbii t be devil art thou!" 
"Onoihmt wIUpUt tbederil. sir. with tou." 

SOME seven years ago the Nr.ws LKTTF.it advocated 
the reservation of the forests fringing Lake Tahoe, 
and brought to public attention the wasteful destruction 
of the noble trees in those woods by the various timber 
companies — or rather one timber company. Seven years 
afterward the Government takes up the matter and does 
exactly what the News Letter urged it should then do. 
There are other forests which the United States Govern- 
ment should protect. There is no country which calls it- 
self civilized that does not have a thoroughly equipped 
forest department whose duty it is to plant trees and pro- 
tect timber. The United States more than any other 
country, perhaps, is in need of such a department, and the 
public press should advocate the foundation of such a de- 
partment and not cry "job" if one were made. 

IMAGINATION is a powerful and picturesque posses- 
sion. A stout and elderly German gentleman, having 
come to the city for a temporary vacation from the in- 
terior, fell into the hands of an alleged doctor. The medi- 
cal man commented upon his ill looks. " You must be un- 
well," said the pseudo physician. "No, I am not, '! was 
the hasty answer. "Oh, you are completely mistaken. 
Your looks tell me you are sick. Now, what you require 
is the rest cure." The German groaned and took the rest- 
cure, which consisted of the unfortunate man staying in 
bed, with the alleged physician perched upon a chair by 
his bedside, feeling the sick man's pulse every five min- 
utes. The charge for effecting the cure was fifty dollars. 
Such patients, however, being few and far between, the 
alleged physician is now exercising his talents as an earn- 
est writer for the Sunday press. 

THE employer who defends his position in employing 
women cashiers and women bookkeepers on the ground 
that they neither smoke, drink, nor chew, and have no 
bad habits, such as attending race tracks, and do not in- 
dulge in the excitement of gambling in stocks or wheat, 
will have this illusion completely destroyed by the late ex- 
pose of Miss Zwald's methods. The calm manner in which 
the fair cashier takes the disgrace would lead one to sup- 
pose that she is somewhat proud of her exploits in the 
tenderloin district, and that it is not worth while to prose- 
cute. 

SN individual called Bennett, who has been publishing 
pictures and articles about art matters in San Fran- 
cisco in an Eastern journal, has endeared himself to the 
fraternity here by boosting' into prominence several art 
students entirely unknown to anybody save their own im- 
mediate circle, and neglecting even to mention the names 
of those artists who have won for themselves fame and 
recognition. Mr. Bennett might take the trouble to learn 
a little about the subject he undertakes to ventilate — as it 
is, he makes himself ridiculous as well as the people he be- 
spatters with his comments. 

« GENTLEMAN who is out here as the commissioned 
bettor for a big man in New York is complaining of 
his ill-luck this season. He claims to have lost $1300 in 
two days, and cannot understand why he does not make a 
winning at Ingleside, when on the Oakland Track he has 
met with great success. Last season he made here $4000 
above all expenses, and as it was his first season here, de- 
termined again to tempt fortune. He used to attend the 
New Orleans races, and speaks contemptuously of that 
city as compared with this in a sporting way. 

WE ought to be proud of our streets, and strangers 
should certainly be invited to the city after there has 
been a few hours' rain. Montgomery street is indeed de- 
lightful. Between Pine and Sacramento streets the side- 
walks are so built that they form an almost continuous 
lake. Nothing is, of course, so sure an indication of a pro- 
gressive city when a man can take a swim in the busiest 
part of town. The Sutro baths compare not quite so 
favorably with this part of Montgomery street. 



DR. lrvin K tenner is a Southern gentleman <'f much 
hauteur and distinguished bearing; so is Mr. Long 
John Wllklns. and though both come from the south of 
Mason and Dixon's line, there is not that ./;/.;.?. conliali 
between them which should exist between compatriots 
Mr. Long John Wilkins is a sporty gentleman with liter 
ary tastes; so is Dr. tenner, but he has no literary Incli- 
nations. There is no pride In the heart of Long John, and 
whenever be meets the doctor he gives him Masonic sig 

nals. "D that fellow," said the irate doctor, as he 

surveyed the elongated form of his dark friend. "Con- 
found him ' Every time 1 happen to pass that chap he 
gives me a Masonic sign. What the devil is the country 
coming to when a nigger can become a Mason?" 

IF the Recording Angel, who is supposed to be for ever 
on the eager look-out for some good act on the part of 
sinners, has not put down many a good mark to the credit 
of the wearied shop-girl and shop-boy during the holidays, 
then his office is as naught. The poor are not forgotten 
during Christmas. The prisoners even get an extra bill of 
fare; but who pities or gives a thought of pity to that 
long-suffering class, who for nigh two weeks have kept 
long watches in the various stores, and have also been ex- 
pected to maintain a cheerful and happy demeanor? 
Surely they have good cause to register themselves as 
martyrs, and indulge in other sins with the hope they will 
be forgiven for what they have endured during the week 
of Christmas. 

S PROMINENT lawyer from the interior, whose great- 
grandfather spiked three Englishmen at one time on 
his bayonet, and threw them over the wall of a fort, in the 
war of Independence, visited San Francisco during the 
holidays and had, it is assured on authority, a somewhat 
festal time. The day came when he had to leave for home, 
and he found himself in the unhappy position of being dead 
broke and no railroad pass. , He borrowed the money. In 
an evil moment he encountered a friend, who proposed 
throwing dice at ten cents a throw. The money went to 
the friend. He negotiated a new loan, and no voice, never 
so alluring, tempted him again from the path of rectitude 
or right doing. He is home now — repentant, but happy. 

IT was a decided pity that some man in the crowd around 
the Broadway Station at Oakland did not administer a 
sound kicking to the man who made so disgraceful an ex- 
hibition of himself. He called the young lady selling 
tickets at' that station a thief, a liar, and other choice 
names because he fancied he had put down 50 cents for a 
ticket instead of 25 cents. If somebody with even half a 
soul had been present that man would not have escaped 
punishment, but there is one consolation: it happened in 
Oakland and not on this side of the bay. 

A CERTAIN actor in town who takes part in a play 
where Indians and a military camp form the central 
points of interest, is much wrought up over the statement 
of a critic that he knows nothing either of the Indian or 
posts of war. It happens that the actor is the son of a 
distinguished Indian fighter, has lived much on the fron- 
tier and in frontier posts, and certainly has some knowl- 
edge of the life he mimics — while the critic has a plenti- 
ful and accurate knowledge of the Indian which adorns 
the cigar stand. 

THE mild Jap is becoming a dangerous creature. It 
was hitherto believed that the Chinaman alone had 
the knack of drawing knife or of shooting, but there seems 
suddenly to have sprung up in the hearts of the little Jap- 
anese murderous inclinations. Not long since a Japanese 
murdered bis fellow worker on board a United States 
vessel, and now here is a Jap shooting at a woman and 
doing her to .death through fright. An execution or so 
among the foreign population would be a wonderful coercer 
toward preserving the law. 

THERE is a general belief that Durrant will not hang 
on January 7th, and that "a job" will be put up to 
bring that gentleman into court as a witness on that day. 
The story goes that somebody will be smashed in the nose 
and that it will be alleged that the assault was made at 
the instigation of the Durrants. The fight, it is said, to 
save Durrant's neck is not yet over, and that no trick will 
be lost in order to prolong the fellow's life. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January i, 1898. 



BANKING. 



Bank of California, San Francisco. 

Capital and Surplus, $6,000,000 

WILLIAM ALVORD President | CHARLES R. BISHOP. .Vice-Pres't 

ALLEN M.CLAY Secretary THOMAS BROWN Cash er 

S. Prentiss Smith.. Ass't Cashier 1 1. F. Moui/ton 2d Ass't Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS. 
New Yobk— Messrs. Laldlaw & Co.; the Bank of New York.N.B.A.. 
BAt.TiMORE-The National Exchange Bank. BOSTON-The Tremont Na- 
tional Bank; Chicago— Illinois Trust and Savings Bank; Cnlon National 
Bank Philadelphia— National Bank o( the Republic. St. Louis— Boat- 
man's Bank. Virginia City (Nev.)-Agency 01 The Bank of California 
London— Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & Sons; Paris— Messrs. de Roths- 
child Freres BERLtN-Dlrectlon der Dlsconto Gesellschaft. China, 
Japan and East Indies— Chartered Bank of India. Australia and China 
Australia and New Zealand— The Union Bank of Australia, Ltd., and 
Bank of New Zealand. 
Letters of Credi t Issued available In all parts of the world. 

California Sate Deposit and Trust Company. 

Cor. California and Montgomery Sis. 

Capital Fully Paid $1,000,000 

Transacts a general banking business 
and allows Interest on deposits payable on demand or after notice. 

Acts as Executor, Administrator, and Trustee under wills or in any 
other trust capacity. Wills are drawn by the company's attorneys and 
are taken care of without charge. 

SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES to rent at prices from $5 per annum up- 
ward according to size, and valuables of all kinds are stored at low rates. 

Directors: J. D. Fry, Henry Williams, I. G. Wickersham. Jacob C. 
Johnson, James Treadwell, F. W. Lougee. Henry F.Fortmann, R B. Wal- 
lace, R. D. Fry, A D. Sharon, and J. DalzellBrown. 

Officers: J. D Fry, President; Henry Williams, Vice-President; R. 
D Fry, Second Vice President; J. Dalzell Brown, Secretary and Treas- 
urer; E E.Shotwell, Assistant Secretary; Gunnison, Booth & Bartnett, 
Attorneys. 

London, Paris and American Bank, Limited. 

N.W. COR. Sansome a Sdtter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital 12,500,000 

Paid Up Capital 12,000.000 

Reserve Fund I 850,000 

Head OrricE 40 Threadneedle Street, London, EC. 

AGENTS— New York— Agency of the London, Paris, and American 
Bank Limited, No. 10 Wall Street, N. Y. Pabis— Messrs. Lazard, Freres 
& Cle, 17 Boulevard Polssonlere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the 
world. Commercial and Travelers' Credits Issued. 

SIG. GREENEBAUM 1 „„.»„.. 
C. ALTSCHUL J Managers. 

Grocker-Woolworth National Bank of S. F. 

Corner Market, Montgomery, 
and Post Streets. 

Pald-Up Capital 11,000,000 

WH.B. CROCKER President 

W. E. BROWN Vlce-Presldenl 

GEO. W.KLINE Cashier 

Directors— Cbas. F. Crocker, E. B. Pond. Hy. J.Crocker, Geo. W. Scon 

The San Francisco National Bank, 

Southeast Corner of Pine and Sansome streets, S. F. 
Jas. K. Wilson. President. E A. Brocciere, Vice-President. 

LEWIS I. CowniLL, Cashier. 

Capital $500,000 

Dire-tors: Jas. K. Wilson. E J. Staples. Wm Pierce Johnson, Geo. 
A. Pope. E. A. Brugulere. Ed. G. Lukeus. Charles C. JuJson. 

Agents: New York— Hanovt r National Bank, Chase National Bank; 
Boston— National Bank of the Commonwealth. Philadelphia— Dresel & 
Co. Chicago— Continental National Bank. St. Louis— The Mechanics' 
Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London— Brown Shipley & 
Co. Paris— Morgan, Harjes & Ce. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

33 Post Street, below Kearny, Mechanics' Institute Building. 
Guaranteed Capital 11,000,000 Pald-Up Capital 1300,000 

JAMES D. PHELAN. President. S. G. MURPHY, Vice-President. 
GEO. A. STORY. Cashier. JOHN A. HOOPER, Vice-President. 

Directors— James D. Pbelan, L P. Drexler, John A. Hooper, C. G. 
Hooker, James MofBtt, S. G. Murphy, Frank J. Sullivan, Robert MoEiroy, 
and Joseph D. Grant. 

Interest paid on Deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order, Wells, Fargo & Co. , or Exchange 
on City Banks. Whenopening accounts send signatuie. 

San Francisco Savings Union. 

Corner California and Webb Streets. 

Deposits. Dec. 31, 1895 HU.XB.Sn 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus ... 1,575.631 
ALBERT MILLER, President | E B. POND, Vice-President 
Directors— Thomas Magee.Q. W. Beaver. Philip Barlb, Daniel E. Mar- 
tin. W. C. B. De Fremery, George C. Boardman, Robert Watt; Lovell 
White, Cashier. 

Receives Deposits, and Loans only on real estate security. Country 
remittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo &■ Co., or by check of reliable 

6 arties, payable in San Francisco, but the responsibility of this Savings 
;ank commences only with the actual receipt of the money. The signature 
of the depositor should accompany the first deposit. No charge la made for 

fiass-book or entrance fee. Office hours— 9. a. u. to 3 p. m. Saturday even- 
ngs,6:30 to 8 




Observation? of a Bachelor, by Louis Lombard. Published by F. 
Tennyson Neely, 114 Fifth Avenue, New York, HOT. 

The author of these ''Observations," which are dedicated 
'To the most illustrious bachelor, Max Nordau, in proof 
of admiration for his courage, learning and intellect," is of 
mixed French and Italian origin, but has lived for many 
years in tl.e United States. He is an excellent musician, 
has travelled considerably, and is familiar with several 
modern languages. He has also studied law, and founded 
the Conservatory of Music and School of languages at 
Utica in New York State. Though he possesses an inti- 
mate acquaintance with the United States, and an excel- 
lent knowledge of the English language, yet his manner 
of expressing himself is not exactly that of an Englishman 
or American. He is fond of sentences so short and cate- 
gorical that his style seems to an English-speaking reader 
jerky and disconnected. There is also a rather evident 
straining after epigrammatic utterance, and a tendency 
to employ language so general that it becomes at times 
rather vague and hazy. Yet for all this, he is so clearly 
honest that he is almost always readable, and, though 
there is nothing specially profound or original in his re- 
marks, they are evidently the results of his own personal 
observation, and express his own convictions. He dis- 
cusses many highly interesting subjects, such as the age 
at which men should marry, the allurements of courtship, 
the advantages and disadvantages of matrimony, and 
similar matters. Most moralists and mentors are in favor 
of early marriages, but Mr. Lombard thinks that men 
should not marry before they are thirty years old. He is 
no admirer of the New Woman or the blue-stocking, and 
very truly says that woman's physical beauty appeals 
much more strongly to man's admiration than her mental 
attainments or spiritual graces. He is shrewd enough to 
perceive that the poor man who marries a rich girl has 
the advantage of feeling practically certain that the 
match is one of inclination on her part, whereas, when a 
man marries a poor girl, he cannot feel quite sure of her 
sentiments. Though himself a bachelor of nearly forty 
years of age, he is fully persuaded that a harmonious 
marriage affords the best chances of happiness in this 
world. In advising his readers to make the search after 
happiness their principal business, he rather overlooks 
the fact that most of our time and energy is taken up 
with efforts to provide ourselves with food, clothing, and 
shelter; if happiness comes incidentally, so much the bet- 
ter, but we cannot devote much attention to the conscious 
pursuit of happiness as an end in itself. Mr. Lombard 
rather parades his independence, and his indifference as 
to whether his readers like what he says or not, but there 
is really nothing very startling in his "Observations," 
though there is much that is true and that will meet with 
the assent of all who have thought about the matters 
whereof he speaks. The cover of Mr. Lombard's little 
book is adorned with a representation of a lighted pipe 
and a smoking cigar, for he recommends a moderate in- 
dulgence in the weed, rightly thinking that few people are 
more objectionable than the man without a redeeming vice. 
These "Observations of a Bachelor" may be recommended 
to the attention of other unfortunates who have not yet 
found "what is popularly termed their affinity." 

Rnb&lyfit of Doc Sifers: by James Whitcotnb Riley. Illustrated by 
O. M. Kelyea, published by The Century Co.. New York, 1897 
Printed on thick, high-surfaced paper, with the page- 
numbers enclosed in orange-red lines, adorned with photo- 
gravures from Mr. Relyea's drawings, and encased in sage 
green covers, this new volume issued by The Century 
Company is certainly pleasant to the eye. The title, how- 
ever, does not seem a happy one, being neither graceful 
nor in very good taste. But, after all, the matter is more 
than the title, and the contents than the cover. In a 
hundred-and-five stanzas of four lines each Mr. Riley has 
given us a clear picture of the honest, honorable country 



January I, 189S. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



>7 



doctor, beloved of all the men, women, and children — es- 
pecially of the children— for lifteen miles round, full of 
sound sense, a clever handler of Run and rod, and running 
over with kindness and good will. Personally, we do not 
like dialect stories or dialect verse, but the dialect em- 
ployed by Mr. Riley is generally so intelligible that it ex- 
cites no antagonism, and it is impossible to help admiring 
the simplicity and nobility of his hero. The artist has evi- 
dently read the text carefully, and is familiar with the 
people depicted by Mr. Riley, for he has supplied pictures 
which really illustrate, that is, shed light on, the author's 
words. 

Recently, in travelling over the Pasadena and Los 
Angeles electric railways we observed upon the cars this 
notice: "Motorneers are not allowed to converse with 
passengers." This is signed "W. H. Smith, Assistant- 
General Manager." We should like to append to this 
prohibition a clause forbidding railroad officials and other 
ignorant persons to tamper with the English language. 
The mechanic responsible for the invention of "Motorneer" 
evidently formed it on the analogy of "Engineer." An 
"engineer" is certainly a man who tends an engine: hence, 
what is more obvious to minds of the Smith type than that 
a "motorneer" is a man who tends a motor? Of course, it 
is as clear as a pike-staff, and as easy as rolling off a log. 
But friend Smith, be he a black-smith, a white-smith, a 
tin-smith, or a gun-smith, overlooked the fact that the 
"n" in "engineer" is part of the word "engine," and that 
"eer" or "er" is the suffix denoting the doer. Heuce his 
word, if formed on the model of "engineer," should have 
been "motor-eer," or "motor-er." But why would not 
the simple and obvious "motor-man" answer all purposes? 
Of course, if friend Smith is not the parent of the 
monstrosity, we beg his pardon, and hope that he will 
pass these comments on to the person who has attempted 
to foist the odious infant upon the English language. 
Surely the newspaper-men of the United States are doing 
enough to vulgarize and barbarize the Anglo-Celtic tongue 
without the officials of railroads, who presumably have 
other employment, lending a hand in the nefarious work. 

The complaint is sometimes heard that British news- 
papers give no information about the United States, and 
certainly one would hardly expect to acquire one's first 
knowledge of a Californian product from the columns of 
The Court Journal. Yet from a recent issue of that 
chronicle of the alliances of the British fashionable world 
we learn that at the Brewers' Exhibition, which opened at 
The Royal Agricultural Hall, Islington, on Saturday, 
October 30th, there was among the exhibits "a liquor, 
which has hitherto been little known in England, but which 
deserves to be looked upon favorably for the reason that 
it comes from a land which can give us pure wines, and is 
in itself honestly made of herbs. This is Monterey, a green 
and yellow liquor made by the Spanish Franciscan monks 
of Monterey, California. It is a perfectly natural liquor 
of very delicate flavor." Are there any "Spanish 
Franciscan monks" at Monterey at the present day, and 
do they really compound this delectable cordial, which 
seems to have so clearly "touched the right spot" in The 
Court Journal man's make-up? Quien sabe? 

In a recent issue of The Critic (N. Y.) Gerald Stanley 
Lee makes the following remarks anent the modern prac- 
tice of using the portraits of distinguished and well-known 
persons for advertising purposes. "The wife of the Presi- 
dent of the United States has been utilized to advertise a 
particular brand of tobacco. Our greatest preacher has 
been paraded across the nation in the name of a famous 
soap. The dead face of a martyred President looks out 
from a thousand bill-boards, to spread the fame of a kid- 
ney-and-liver cure. Adelina Patti belongs to something — 
we have forgotten what: and Calve smiles Malt Extract 
around the world. Ex-President Harrison is employed 
by The Ladies' Home Journal; Gladstone is an advertising 
agency for books; and the Prime Minister of China, not to 
be outdone by civilization, has put the serene Mongolian 
seal of his oriental face upon a pill." 



BRUSHES 



J. F. Cutter and Argonaut are as pore and true as experience, 
care and age can make them— the premierdrinks found the world 
round. Every man who visits the Alaska gold fields should fortify 
himself with these fine liquors. Sole Pacific Coast agents E. Martin 
& Co., 411 Market street. 



For barbers, baiters, bootblack!*, baib-hounes, toll 
Hard tablet, brewers, book- bin dor*, eondymolior* 
cannera. dyers. Hour-mills, foundries, laundries 
paper bangers, printers, painters, shoo factories. 
■ tablemen, tar-roofers, tanners tailors, etc. 

BUCHANAN BROS., 

BRUSH MANUFACTURERS, 609 Sacramento St. ,S. F Tel. 5610. 



UNITED STATES 
LAUNDRY. 



Telephone South 430, 



Office, 1004 Market Street. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



BANKING. 



Bank of British Columbia. 

Southeast Cor. Bush and Sansome Sts. 
Incorporated by Royal Charter, 1862. 

Capital Paid Up 83,000,000 

Reserve Fund I 500,000 

HEAD OFFICE 80 LOMBARD STREET, LONDON 

Branches— Victoria, Vancouver, New Westminster, Kamloops, Nan- 
lamo, Nelson, Sandon, and Kaslo, British Columbia; Portland, Oregon. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents, as follows : 

New YORK— Merchants' Bank of Canada; Chicago— FlrstNationalBank; 
Liverpool— North and South Wales Bank; Scotland— British Linen 
Company; Ireland — Bank of Ireland; Mexico— London Bank of Mexico ; 
South America— London Bank of Mexico and South America ; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China; Australia and 
New Zealand — Bank of Australasia and Commercial Banking Company or 
Sydney, Ld; Demerara and Trinidad (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 

The flnglo-Galifornian Bank, Limited. 

Capital authorized (6,000,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 

Paid Up 1,600,000 

Reserve Fund 700,000 

N. E. Cor. Pine and Sanso b Sts 
Head Office — 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Sellgman & Co., 21 Broad street. 

The Bank transaots a General Banking Business, sells drafts, makes 

telegraphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the 

world. Sends bill* for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 

and bullion. IGN. STEINHART 1 M . n . „.__ 

P. N. LILIENTHAL f Managers 

The German Savings and Loan Societu. 

No. 526 California Street, San Francisco 
Guarantee capital and surplus — $2,040,201 66 
Capital actually paid up in cash.. 1,000 000 00 

Deposits December 31,1896 27,730,247 45 

OFFICERS: President, B. A. Becker; First Vice-President, Daniel 
Meyer; Second Vice-President, H. Horstman; Cashier, A. H. R Schmidt; 
Assistant Cashier, WiUiam Herrmann; Secretary, George Tourny ; Assist- 
ant Secretary, A. H. Muller; Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS: B. A. Becker, Daniel Meyer. H. Horst- 
mann, Ign. Steinhart, N. Van Bergen, E. Rohte, H. B. Russ, D. N. 
Walter and N. Ohlandt. 

Wells Fargo & Go.'s Bank. 

N. E. Corner Sansome & Sutter Streets 

John J. Valentine President 

Homer S. King Manager 

H. Wadsworth Cashier 

F. L. Llpman Assistant Cashier 

Cash Capital and Surplus 16,250,000 

BRANCHES. 
N. Y. City, H. B. Parsons, Cashier. | Salt Lake City, J. E. Dooly, Cashier 
Portland, Or.. R. M. Dooly, Cashier. 
Directors— John J. Valentine, Benj, P. Cheney, Oliver Eldridge, Henry 

E. Huntington, Homer S. King, George E. Gray, John J. McCook, John 
Bermingham, Dudley Evans. 

SWISS American Bank 0fL ARNO, Switzerland, and 

California Mortgage & Savings Bank, ^t , n s 8 F mer5 

Paid-up Capital and Reserves, $620,000. 

A general savings and commercial banking business transacted. Inter- 
est paid on savings deposits. Loans on approved real estate security, and 
on commercial paper. 

DIRECTORS— Ernst A.Denicke, A. Sbarboro. J. C. Rued, E. Martinoni, 
F C. Slebe, A. Tognazzini, H Brunner, McD R. Venable, A. G. Wieland, 

F. Kronenberg, Charles Martin, C. Gehret, P. Tognazzini, S. Grand!, 

Securitu Savings Bank. 

322 MONTGOMERY ST.. MILLS BUILDING. 
INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. 
LOANS MADE. 

DIRECTORS. 

William Alvord S. L. Abbot Jr. H. H. Hewlett 

Wm Baboook O.D.Baldwin E. J. McCutchen 

Adam Grant W.S.Jones R. H. Pease 



i8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January i, 1898. 





jNE of the easiest ways 
of securing a little 
newspaper notoriety which is admirably and frequently 
worked, is for the desirer thereof to advertise the fact 
that he or she is about to proceed on a distant journey — 
either to the East or Europe. The date is then indefinitely 
postponed, the would-be traveler receives innumerable 
congratulatory regrets, and after a time the whole sub- 
ject is forgotten. Sometimes this little deception is carried 
out to the extent of a temporary sojourn in an obscure 
country town, as is the case with that prominent gentle- 
man from a Southern city who mysteriously disappeared 
and then reappeared — but he most carefully avoided ques- 
tions pertaining to the duration of his stay in "gay Paree." 

* * # 

Gentlemen afllicted with a certain rotundity, which was 
the bane of the genial Jack Falstaff, had better beware of 
a beauteous siren with lovely eyes, a tailor-made suit, and 
a seductive voice. This lady has a peculiar invention for 
sale, which compresses and reduces the size. She called 
the other day upon a prominent railroad man thus incon- 
venienced, who fell into raptures over the figure-improver 
as well as the figure of the figure-imp 1 will 

take one." said the gallant gentleman: "send it to my 
address." "Oh." replied the lady, " I have to take your 
measure." " You can't do it here — in my office," gasped 
the delighted one, feeling apprehensive of an influx of 
batches of telegrams. " I can come to your house," 
cooed thefairone. "Madame," said the gentleman, get- 
ting alarmed; "unhappily for both of us, I am married " 

* * * 

A lew weeks ago a pair of ambitious society seekers 
gave an enormous reception in their brand-new house and 
sunt out invitations to the number of six hundred. About 
one hundred people attended the function and not ten out 
of that number could be regarded as intimates of the host 
and hostess. But the end was served. The newspapers 
duly chronicled the event and published the list of the 
guests, and many a prominent name was printed whose 
owners never dreamed of swelling the calling list of these 
people. 

* # * 

There is much curiosity among the friends of the newly- 
married couple whether the freshly made Benedict will 
IT the way of the old Adam that was within him and 
take on the habits which should belong to a good husband. 
Mis only fault was a total disregard for appointments or 
rather the time for which they were made. For instance, 
the theatre generally opens at 8 p. m., and the young lady 
was not infrequently seen till 10:30 p. m. — what excuses 
the gallant swain made are not recorded, — but her 
patience must have been out of the record. 
# * * 

An amusing story is going the rounds that a certain 
capitalist, more renowned for wealth than generosity, very 
□early got into trouble in his domestic circle by choosing 
gifts for his home and his outside friends at the same store, 
and in the rush of delivery the packages were mixed. So 
Madam got what was intended for a side affair, and has 
been boasting to her friends of the lovely present she re- 
ceived from her spouse, ar.d "after so many years, too." 

* * * 

1 cosy little confab in the corner at the recent Scott 
e has been making tongues wag ever since; and now, 

say the quid nuno, the !ong-talked-of engagement will 
■ be declared. That there is nothing like a generous 

dinner to warm the cockles r.f the masculine heart seems 

to be true in this case. 

riAN Henna. Safe, Sob« PleasAHT. a vegetable hair dye tor 
restoring gray hair to Its original color. Immediate oftect. Frcelfrom all 
objectionable qualities. At all druggists and hair dressers. Lnnglcy & 
Michaels Co.. agents. 

KiNKsiatlonery, steel and copperplate engraving. Cooper & Co . 74fl 
Market street, San Francisco. 




The . . 

R. B. HflYDEN" 

Fine old band-made Sour 
Mash Whiskey. On account 
of tts absolute purity and 
delicacy of flavor is pro- 
nounced by connoisseurs to 
be without an equal, and Is 
regarded by tbe medical fac- 
ulty as superior to all others 
for the use of invalids. 

Having been 

BOTTLED IN BOND 

under supervision of the U. 
S. Government, age, proof, 
and purity are guaranteed. 
The U. S. stamp precludes 
the possibility of adultera- 
tion, and consumers can ex 
erefse their own judgment in 
diluiing. 



LADIES!! 



Before buying anywhere else, if you want to be 
astonished, come and look at my windows and 
see marked the biggest bargains in Jackets, 
Suits, Fur Capes, Silk Waists, Silk 
Skirts, Feather Boas, etc. 
Terrific Reductions During the Holidays, 

OPEN EVERY NIGHT. 

ARHAND CAILLEAU, 

Corner Geary street and Grant avenue. 



fl. P. rlornberg,. 



23 KEARNY ST., S. F. 

Rooms 4 and 5. 



Telephone Red 385. 



FINE TAILORING. 



d. D. SULLIUAN 

Attorney-at- Law 
Rooms 34-38, 3d Floor Chronicle Building, San Francisco. 

DR. CHRISTENSEN, Dentist, 

Has removc-d to £720 Mission street, between Twenty-third and 
Twenty-fourth. Four specialists in attendance. 
Phone— Mission 160. 

DR. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL 
CREAM, OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER. 

Removes Tan, Pimples, Freckles, Moth 
Patches. Rash, and Skin Diseases, and 
every blemish on beauty, and defies de- 
tection It has stood the test of 48 years 
and is so harmless we taste it to be sure 
it is properlv made Accept no countei 
felt of similar name. Dr. L. A. Sayre 
said to a lady of tbe haut-ton (a pa- 
tient) : As you ladles will use them. I 
recommend 'Gouraud's Cream" as the 
least harmful of all the Skin prepara- 
tions. " For sale by all Druggists and 
Fancy-Goods Dealers in the United 
States, Canadas, and Europe 

?ERD. T. HOPKINS, Prop'r, 

37 Great JonesSt.N. Y. 




5. F. News latter. 



[19] 



January 1, 1898. 




DAWN ON CLEAR LAKE 
LAKE COUNTY, CAL. 




SO NEAR AND YET SO FAR 

From the Painting by A. F. Mnchley. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January i, 1898. 




THE TOWN OE BABYVILLE — lou j. beauchamp, in new york voice 

IT'S the dearest town, the fairest town, the prettiest town to me, 
Of all the towns in all the lands, this side or 'cross the sea ; 
It's sunshine there, and moonshine there, and starshineall the time, 
And it's never cold, and none get old, in its lovely summer clime; 
There's never a ghost or a goblin there, and sin was never known, 
And no one ever had a pain, or heard a neighbor groan, 
And the birds sing always, night aad day, in fact they're never still, 
In this airy, fairy, darling place, the Town of Baby ville. 

The stores are full of sweetmeats, and they're sold for just a song, 

The hobby-horses in the streets are free the whole day long; 

The band plays every afternoon, there's fireworks every night. 

And all the babies toddle out to see tbe glorious sight 

You kiss them as you meet them, and they kiss you when you go, 

And clap their hands, and laugh with glee, to see you at their show ; 

The dostor died last summer, and is resting o'er the hill, 

For none get sick, they haven't time, in the Town of Babyvilte. 

The houses are of gingerbread, the fences are of cake ; 
The river's full of lemonade, and a big panada lake; 
You eat whenever hungry, and you drink whenever dry, 
And pay your board in kisses— that surely isn't high ; 
But if you want to live there you have to pay a toll. 
Some pay it very readily, some can't, to save their soul ; 
It's not in gold or silver, nor yet a paper bill, 
It's just to bring a baby to the Town of Babyville. 
You cau live with us forever, if a baby comes along, 
We want another sunny face, another voice in song, 
For we all sing in our village, from the book of Mother Goose, 
And it takes a babe to teach you how to let your voice out loose; 
Bo If you think of coming, just send your name along, 
And tell us when the baby came, and if it's well and strong, 
And tell us when to meet you, we'll be waiting by the mill, 
And the band will play you welcome to the Town of Babyville. 
Odd bless us all, and keep us, what heavy hearts there'd be 
1 f all these little darlings should be lost to you and me ; 
There would never be a sunny day in all the wide, wide land, 
And all the skies above us, with clouds could but be spanned. 
But God is good: stop worrying, and join me in a song- 
Here's love, and life, and sunsnine to the babies, weak and strong ! 
Let's raddle down beside them, and rest content, until 
God calls us all to Heaven, from the Town of Babyville. 

SORROW -AUBREY DE VERE. 

Count each atlliction, whether light or grave 
God's messenger sent down to thee; do thou 
With courtesy receive him; rise and bow; 
And, ere his shadow pass thy threshold, crave 
Permission first his heavenly feet to lave; 
Then lay before him all thou hast; allow 
1 No cloud of passion to usurp thy brow, 
Or mar thy hospitality; no wave 
Of mortal tumult to obliterate 
The soul's niarmore.il calmness: grief should be 
Like joy, majestic, equable, sedate; 
Confirming, cleansing, raising, making free; 
Strong to consume small trouble ; to commend 
Great thoughts, grave thoughts, thoughts lasting to the end. 

A WEE JAP'NESE seawall read, in godey's- 

You resemble a picture upon a fan, 

My little, diminutive maid of Japan. 

Your hair a la teapot with daggers thrust through, 

Your obi a real, Oriental, dull blue. 

Your sandals of yellow, embossed with gold, 

Your Btagreed ear-rings so very old. 

Your boa-bODB of sugar and powdered rice, 

1 think it all funny, but ever so nice. 

< 'h, damsel, whose days are spent in play, 

Who only laughs the hours away, 

S.iy d069 your life ne'er fail to please.' 

Ah, no, you're only a "wee Jap'nese." 

FAITH AND DOGMA-— wuliam h- hayne. in the independent. 

Faith is a giant, serene and wise, 
With starlit brow ami an angel's eyes; 
Mansions arise where his feet have trod 
On the mighty rock of the grace of I 
ia, the dwarf, Is a stubborn elf. 
Who hugs all tenets that please himself; 
He only builds lor the world's vast deeds 
Krail huts on the sand of unproved creeds. 




FRANClSCaCAL, 



(tfl 

Some papers give all the 

news part of the time, 

and some papers give 

|| part of the news all of : 

b> the time '■■• >'• X :■: 1 



r 

Jbe Qall 






Is the only paper that gives 



ALL THE NEWS ALL THE TIME 



SUBSCRIPTION PRICE-lncluding Postage: 

Daily Call (mcl'd'g Sunday) 12 mos..$6.00 I Sunday Call. .12 mos.. 11.50 i 

uj - 6 " 3 CO I Weekly Call.. 12 " 1.50 i 

® " 3 " 1.50 I " " 6 " 75 

G) " " '• •• i " 6 >Sunday and 

^ Delivered by carrier every day, 65 cts. | Weekly Call 12 " 2.50 , 

© 

® JOHN D. SPRECKELS. Proprietor. 

<8 




ORANGE TONIC CORDIAL 



MADE. IN CALIFORNIA OF CAUFORNJA I 

tOm CLNUINt ftttPT BO&IN&SIO NATURE & itAl 



^<*^&&0 > * 



ft DELIGIOUS ftfTER-DINNER CORDIAL. 
A Most Wonderful Tonic. 
A Nerve and Blood Regenerator. 
No Drugs. Not an Excitant, *^ 

FORMULA: The Essen ial Oil in the rlDd of the orange, a carmina- 
tive; the extract or the fresh orange blossoms, a nervine and sedative; the 
extract of i he leaves, a febrifuge; the juice of the orange, unchanged by 
cooklDg or fermentation, antibilious, to which is added tbe phosphates of 
iron and manganese, making a true Tonic and blood regenerator ; indorsed 
by leading physicians its the must agreeable and powerful Tonic on the 
market. 

F« ft. fiflBER, Manager the Emporium Wine and Liquor Dept. 



January i. 1898. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



5UNBEAMS 

TTiiiiiiiiiiiii 1 1 in mil 



"Oh, I had an awful lime with that 
hackman last night." "Tell us." 
"I pave him a little extra change to 
get himself something to warm up 
with while he was waiting for the 
play to end, and he took so much that 
he saw all the city blocks double. 
Then he wanted to tight me because 
he thought he had driven me two 
miles instead of one." — Cincinnati 
Enquirer. 

"Is it true," asked an acquaintance 
of a girl who returned from Boston, 
"that there is an air of culture and 
educational refinement plainly notice- 
able in the speech of Boston resi- 
dents?" "My dear," she replied im- 
pressively, "even owls around Boston 
hoot 'Tc whom!' instead of 'To whoo!' 
as in the West." — Kansas City Star. 

Sho — You see, we were discussing 
whether two could live as cheaply as 
one, and — well, we both had the same 
chair — and papa came in. 

He — And did you decide the ques- 
tion? "No; but we agreed, after 
papa left, that two could feel as cheap 
as one, anyway." — Indianapolis Jour- 
nal. 

Smythe — Did you hear what Kiely's 
little boy said when they showed him 
the triplets? Browne — No; what 
was it? Smythe — He said: "There! 
Mamma's been gettin' bargains 
again." — Globe Democrat. 

"You are short a cent," said the 
conductor, as he leaned forward and 
breathed heavily. "You are not," 
said Briggs, as he caught an agoniz- 
ing waft of garlic. — Cleveland Plain 
Dealer. 

Little Wilde (at the Klondike supper 
table, with grimace) — Ma, there is 
gold dust on my pie. Mrs. Williams 
(indifferently) — Never mind, Willie, 
everyone up here must eat his peck 
of gold dust, sometime or other. 

Little Drusiiia — Does your mamma 
take you in her lap evenings and tell 
you fairy stories? Mine does. Little 
Dorothy (gloomily) — No, my mother 
hasn't got any lap. She wears 
bloomers. — New York World. 

Mrs. Newlyspliced ( with evident 
surprise) — Aren't you the very man I 
gave some cake to only two days ago? 
Perambulating Pete (in explana- 
tion) — Yes'm. Y'see, I didn't eat it. 

A New York scientist exulting an- 
nounces that he "has discovered the 
secret of sleep. " We have felt sure 
all along that the Philadelphia mys- 
tery ultimately would be solved. 

He — I told your father we expected 
to be married next month, and he was 
wild. She — What did he say? He — 
He wanted to know why we couldn't 
make it next week. — Puck. 

"Does my whistling disturb you?" 
"Oh, not in the least. I'm used to 
hearing men whistle. I'm a collector 
for a millinery house." — Yonkers 
Statesman. 



£*%%%% 




lifts Piper Heidsieck Plug 
Tobacco above all other brands. 
Its champagne flavor has made it 
famous. 

Buy the NEW FIVE-CENT PIECE : enlarged 40 per cent. £ 



J. D. Spreckels & Bros. Co. 

Shipping and Commission Mer- 
chants. General agents 

Oceanic Steamship Company. 

Gillmgham Cement. 

327 Market St.* cor. Fremont, S. F. 
PACIFIC TOWEL COMPANY. Li( £ pi 9 aco 

Furnishes clean towels at the following low 
rates : Clean hand towels each week, $1 per 
month ; 12 clean hand towels each week $1 50 
permonlh; 4 clean roller towels each week. 
$1 per month ; 6 olean roller towels each 
week, |l ^6 per month. 



Georae Morrow, & 6o., 

(Established 1854.) 

fifty AND GRAIN 

Commission Merchants. 

Warehouse 526 Seventh St. 

128 Clay street, S. F. Tel. Main 35 



HYGIENIC VAPOR-BATH. 

ItUNMiitu, Mcilicmuii Bulbs. Keuovatos your ays- 
mjs UHEU.M AT1SM, Aatumu, La Grippe. Neu- 
Igla, Eczema, Catarrh. MALAKIA. FEMALE ILLS. 
Rlt>od, Skin. Nerve. LIVER and KIDNEY Diseases. 
'.Beautifies Complexion. Beat made. Price very low. 
\WliOLESALE TO AGENTS. HYGIENIC BATH 
1K&CABINET CO., 607 Church St , NiaHVTLLB, Tkhm. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January I, 1898. 




THE Congregational Church periodically frequented by 
Dr. Frank Woolsey gave a dinner, not long ago, to 
which were bidden all the worshipers. Contrary to the 
custom in such ecclesiastical doings, no charge was made 
for the dinner, which was a remarkably good one. Every- 
thing was free. Dr. Frank had just come in from his 
rounds, was hungry enough to thoroughly enjoy the turkey 
and mince pie, and by the time he had finished, was in an 
exceedingly appreciative mood. 

Before he rose from the table, the genial physician 
noticed a little card lying beside his plate. It was a pledge 
to pay every Sunday a stated sum to the funds of the 
church, with blank spaces for the amount and for the name 
of the contributor. Woolsey supposed it had been dropped 
there by accident, and in that comfortable mood which 
comes after a good dinner, proceeded to adorn the card 
with his autograph. Then he wrote the words, "one 
dollar," and laughingly tossed it among the turkey bones 
and other relics of his meal. 

He thought no more about the affair, except to cherish 
pleasant recollections of the dinner, until last Sunday, 
when the treasurer of the church asked him for four dol- 
lars. 

" What for '.'" asked Frank in astonishment, for he had 
just dropped some loose silver on the collection plate. 

The treasurer exhibited the pledge, which had been 
preserved more carefully than Woolsey anticipated. The 
doctor silently counted OLt four large round dollars, with 
a wry face. 

"By jove!" he said, reflectively. "It's a lucky thing I 
didn't write five dollars on that blamed card!" 

* # * 

It has often been remarked how tenaciously Mexicans 
cling to the exclusive use of their own dialect of the Span- 
ish language and how particularly unwilling they are to 
give evidence in English. Illustrative of this peculiarity, 
Superior Judge Belcher tells a little story. In a recent 
suit, one of the most important witnesses was a swarthy 
individual whose appearance belied his boast that he was 
"pure Spanish." He signified his desire to give his testi- 
mony through an interpreter. Then ensued an interest- 
ing colloquy in which Judge Belcher took a hand. 

•• Do you not understand English?" inquired the Judge. 

" No." promptly replied the Mexican. 

"Sure?' queried the Judge, suspicious at the other's 
readiness. 

"Sure!" unhesitatingly answered the unwilling witness. 
'Not a word?" pursued the Judge, naively. 

" Not i. word ! " solemnly returned the guileless native. 

It developed eventually that the witness knew much 
more English than the interpreter! 

* * * 

The genial gentleman who officiates as hangman at San 
Quentin Prison has added to his repertoire a new accom- 
plishment,— that of prophecy. The latest occasion on 
which his professional services" were brought into requisi- 
tion, was when he assisted Allender to make his conge 
during the first week of December. At the conclusion of 
that ceremony, Major Lunt predicted that he would per- 
form a similar service for Mr. Durranton January seventh. 

And lo, and behold! Two weeks later, Superior Judge 
Bahrs fixed on that identical date for Durrant's execution 
at the fourth sentencing of the Emanuel Church murderer! 

* # * 

Last accounts of Sigmund Beel, the violinist, are practi- 
cally no accounts at all, for the taleuted San Francisco 
musician has not been beard from since he started for the 
Black Forest in the depths of which he is supposed to have 
been lost, together with his German music master. The 
maestro discovered that Sigmund is a genius and is now 
devoting all his time to the development of his prodigy. 

Beel'sonly audiences now are the owls and the pelicans, 
but he may return to San Francisco one da}' and again 
draw his bow for our admiration. 



With the true spirit of Christmas in his heart and with 
a firm conviction that he was properly observing it in his 
mind, Walter S. Hinkle, Assistant District Attorney, 
boarded an Eddy street electric car on Christmas Eve. 
Walter is a jolly fellow and he beamed benignly on his 
fellow passengers. Suddenly he bethought him of his des- 
tination. 

"Say, Mr. Dealer," he shouted to the conductor, "do 
you know Pine street when you come to it?" 

The man of fares modestly admitted the possession of 
that much knowledge. 

"Well, I'll be jiggered if I do," pursued the public pro- 
secutor. "Just give me one off the top, when we get 
there." 

The conductor gave his happy passenger a little, kindly 
advice. 

" No," replied Walter, deprecatingly. "I don't drink 
much. But then," he added, with an air of triumph, "I 

drink often!" 

# * * 

During a furious north wind, not long ago, a long veil of 
nun's veiling worn by a lady walking along the street, was 
blown out like a streamer from a flag pole. Portly General 
Barnes, on his daily tramp, which no sort of weather in- 
duces him to omit, approached from an opposite direction. 
Suddenly the long veil, driven by the gale, shot out from 
the bonnet, caught the General around the neck, and held 
him fast, a not unwilling prisoner. He waited contentedly 
until he was released. 

"If you had been a young woman, sir, ' remarked the 
lady, with pleasant self possession, "I should certainly 
have said that 'you had just taken the veil.' " 

"And I, madam," responded the gallant General, promp- 
tly, "would be willing to take anything, if I could keep a 
lady like you from hiding ber pleasant ways and ready wit 

in a yard of nun's veiling or in the yard of a nunnery!" 

* * # 

That very dilettante young man, "Captain" Frank E. 
Webb, who was once a private in the National Guard, but 
whose connection with the military organization long ago 
ceased, acquired his title by the system in vogue in Ken- 
tucky. He was a guest at a recently held cotillion, where 
the principal figure danced was that known as "The flags 
of all nations. " At one point in the dance, the leader 
asked Webb to carry the German flag. The "Captain" 
was highly affronted. 

" Carry a foreign flag?" he demanded. " No, sir. Cap- 
tain Webb carries but one flag. I am in the service of 
my country, and I carry only the stars and stripes!" 

And the "Captain" swelled with patriotism to such an 
alarming extent, that the cotillion was broken up. 

A Wonderful Talking Machine. 
Perfection has at last surely been reached in talking maohines. The 
latest and most perfect machine has just come out. It is loud and clear, 
and reproduces your own or any voice over and over again; speeches from 
the most noted statesmen, songs from the world's greatest singers, music 
from the greatest bands. The price of this wonderful machine is but $10, 
and it affords a wonderful opportunity for those who wish to give public 
entertainments. This machine is now controlled bv. and catalogue and 
full particulars can be had from, Sears, Roebuck & Co., Chicago. Just 
cut this notice out and send to tbem for a book telling all about It. 



T»i Press clipping Bureau, 510 Montgomerr street, S. F. reads all 
papers on toe Pad He Coast, and supplies ollppllgs on all topics business 
and personal. 

Huber's Del Monte Orchestra furnishes the best ruusic for an en- 
tertainment. Telephone: Care Benj. Curtaz, Main 1247. 








^V££#:fr~P ST. 

OPP05' 



/VIENNA 
fB£NTWOOD> 
* rjftxi. 



JtANfhMNCISCQ 



K&TST.Sq^ 

TC KE.A.RSV ST j 

SSG. I 



EP.H0UE 816 



January I. 1898. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



23 



ART IN SAN FRANCISCO. 

THERE is no surer indication either of the prosperity of 
a community or of its culture than by the decoration 
of its homes. San Francisco is rapidly receding from the 
era of the small frame house and the ramshackle buildings. 
In the past few years there has been a marked improve- 
ment both in the size of the buildings and their architec- 
ture. We also have been presented with statues and 
fountains by generous citizens, which all go to prove that 
we are not forgetting or neglecting the artistic side of 
life in a mad haste to secure riches. 

Naturally, then, when our tastes are so improved in one 
direction they embrace an improvement in other direc- 
tions. The time was when articles of sertu could only be 
seen in the houses of the enormously wealthy; and it was 
current gossip that in one mansion alone on Nob Hill and 
in one room there were stored one million dollars' worth of 
bric-H-brac But now this is not the only house where 
such articles can be seen. Treasures which were once re- 
garded as priceless and only to be secured by those who 
had the advantages of foreign travel, can now be had at 
sums very little in advance over what they can be pur- 
chased in Paris and other art centers. It is astonishing 
to think that, though we are several thousands of miles 
away from the great art factories of the European con- 
tinent, yet we have the product of their establishments in 
our midst, within reach of those of moderate means. In 
bronzes alone we have small busts of historical characters 
to those of modern figures, so exquisitely designed that 
they seem to be most lifelike, especially the one which rep- 
resents Diana in repose. The figure of Jeanne d'Arc is in 
graceful and romantic pose, as also is a Vainqueur in 
antique bronze. Among other bronzes we have in the city 
is one of "Hope," " The Wolfe Hunter," and a magnificent 
small bronze of Voltaire. These are but a few of the many 
that delight the eye and gratify the artistic sense. 

Lamps, on which the Greeks and Romans expended so 
much taste, are now beautifully made. Those of Limoges 
and Sevres are exquisitely designed. Clocks, which were 
once regarded as simply useful articles, are now made as 
much for ornament as use. They are made not only in gilt 
and bronze, but of exquisite china and cut glass. Tables 
of marqueterie and inlaid gold, and all kinds of woods, can 
now take the place of the ordinary mahogany table, which 
was regarded as a masterpiece of art some few years ago. 

But perhaps there has been no improvement so great as 
in glass. Punch bowls, candelabra, champagne glasses, 
and liqueur glasses are now so daintily made that they 
appear so fragile as if the slightest breath would pulverize 
them, and yet they are actually stronger than the coarse 
glasses in which our fathers so delighted. 

All Europe has been ransacked to supply us with curi- 
osities in the shape of cabinets and cases for the reception 
of curios, together with pedestals in onyx rarely carved 
and cut. In potteries we have the famous Rookwood, 
both in flower and animal life. In fact, from pictures to 
dainty little articles of enameled silver, the list is com- 
plete, and the community has to thank Mr. Raphael Weil, 
of the White House, for bringing to San Francisco such a 
store of art treasures. 

A Panorama 440 Miles Long. 
From the Observation Car on the New York Central a living pan- 
orama 440 miles long may be seen. This includes the Genesse, 
Black River and Mohawk Valleys and 143 miles of the Hudson 
River, including the foothills of the Adirondack Mountains; the 
Capitol at Albany ; the Catskill Mountains; the Palisades of the 
Hudson and the New York Central's magnificent approach to the 
metropolis — this being the only trunk line whose trains enter the 
city of New * ork. 

Call at Rosekrans& Co., No. 342 Hatter street, and inspect their 
"Crown Incandescent Gas Burner." This burner has no equal, giv- 
ing the most light at the smallest cost of any other gas-burner. 
These gentlemen snpplv mantles for all gas. burners. 



Thin in flesh? Perhaps it's 
natural. 

It perfectly well, this is 
probably the case. 

But many are suffering 
from frequent colds, nervous 
debility, pallor, ami a hun- 
dred aches and pains, simply 
because they are not rleshv 
enough. 

Scott's Emulsion of Cod- 
liver Oil with Hypophos- 
phites strengthens the diges- 
tion, gives new force to the 
nerves, and makes rich, red 
blood. It is a food in itself. 

50c. and $1.00, all druggists. 
SCOTT & BOWNE, Chemists, New York. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
San Francisco Savings Union. 

For the half year ending Dec. 31, 1897. a dividend has been declared at the 
rate per annum of four and two-ienths (4 2) per cent, on term deposits and 
three and five-tenths (3 5) percent, on ordinary deposits, free of taxes, 
payable on and after Monday, January 3, 1898. 

Office— 532 California street, cor. Webb LOVELL WHITE, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Hutchinson Sugar Plantation Company. 
^"Dividend No. 50, of -10 cents per snare, of the Hutchinson Sugar Planta- 
tion Company, will be payable at the office of the company, 327 Market St., 
on and after Monday, December 20, 1897. Transfer booku will close on 
Tuesday. Dec. U, 1897,, at 3 o'clock p.m. E. H. SHELDON, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings and Loan Society. 

For the half year ending December 31, 1897, a dividend has been de- 
clared at the rate of four and twenty-six hundredths (4 26-100) per cent per 
annum on Term Deposits, and three and fifty-five hundredths (3 55-100) per 
cent, per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free of taxes, payable on and after 
Monday, January 3, 1898. GEO. TOURNY, Secretary. 

Office— 526 California street. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

For the half year ending December 31, 1897, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of four (4) per cent, per annum on term deposits, and three and 
one-third (3%) per cent, per annum on ordinary deposits, free of taxes, 
payable on and after Monday, January 3, 189rf. 

Office— 33 Post street, San Francisco, Cal. GEO. A. STORY, Cashier. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Bullion Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Franoisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Dheotors, held 
on the l"th day of December, 1897, an assessment, No. 51, of Five cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately in Uni ted States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of 
the company, room 11, 331 Pine street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
21st DAY OF JANUARY, 1898. 
will be delinquent, and advertised for sale at public auction, ind unless 
payment is made before, will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the 12th day of 
February, 1898. to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of 
advertising and expenses of sale . By order of the Board of Directors. 

R. R. GRAYSON. Secretary. 

Office— Room 11, 331 Pine street, San Francisco, Cal 

DR. JAS. G. GILBERTSON. Dentist. 

819 Mabkei Street, third floor, room E, San Francisco 
Hours : 9 u- 5. Academy of Sciences Building. 

THE OPIUM AND MORPHINE HABIT. 

" What We May Do to be Saved" is a little book, 
giving full particulars of a reliable cure. Free. 
i>r. J.L. Stephens, Dept. B., Lebanon, Ohio. 



BOOS BROS 

27-37 Kearnu St. 



Useful 

Holiday 

Presents 



House Coats, 
Bath-Robes, 
Traveling Rugs, 
Shawls. 



Mackintoshes, 
Overcoats, 
Ulsters, 
Full-Dress Suits, 



Neckwear, 
Umbrellas, 
Hats, 
Gloves, etc. 



Bous and Children's Fine Clothing a Specialty. 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January i, 1898 . 




A MERRY Christmas was no misnomer this year, for 
all the world and his wife, as well as their children, 
appeared in the best of spirits. The day was simply 
glorious, with its bright, warm sunshine, clear blue sky, 
and soft, delicious air, and to be out of doors was a pure 
and unalloyed delight; in a word, it was a typical Cali- 
fornia winter day. San Francisco has, in fact, been es- 
pecially favored this year, the whole of Christmas week 
being clear and beautiful in regard to weather, and, from 
a social standpoint, what a gay, merry, busy week it was. 
Our society matrons are, as a rule, too engrossed with 
household cares and holiday shopping to indulge in festiv- 
ities until those duties have been successfully accomplished; 
but this year was a decided exception to that rule. To 
begin, on Monday evening Mis. Nat Messergave a delight- 
ful entertainment at the Bella Vista, for the purpose of 
formally presenting her pretty daughter to Society's 
swim. The ballroom, in which the festivities took place, 
was attractive to a degree; festoons of scarlet cloth 
adorned the walls, over which were garlands of smilax 
and Christinas greens: holly berries, mistletoe, and red- 
shaded lanterns were artistically arranged throughout the 
room, and between the dances were presented on the 
stage at one end of the room a series of scenes and beauti- 
ful tableaux. The first tableau was "A Serenade in Spain," 
in which Miss Muriel Atherton and Fred Knight took 
part. The second was entitled "The DSbutante," Miss 
Carrie Ayres, Messrs. McBride, Russell, Messer, and Dr. 
Brodeiick, TJ. S. N, being the participants. Miss Marie 
Messer and her brother Nat Jr., appeared in "Under the 
Mistletoe," Miss Gertrude Forman made a very pretty 
"Lady of Quality;" and Miss Marie Messer carried off the 
honors of the evening as 'A Daughter of the Orient." 
The scenes were entitled "An Evening Down South," and 
"The Japanese at Home.'' Dancing was prolonged until 
a late hour, an elaborate supper being served at midnight 
in the prettily decorated annex. Among those present 
were the Misses May Belle Gwin, Bernie Drown, Alice 
Hoffman, Helen Thornton, Agnes Simpson, Ethel Keeney, 
Leontine Blakeman. Marie Wells, Muriel Atherton. Carrie 
Ayres, Gertrude Bates, Lucy Jackson, Edith Stubbs, 
Bessie Ames, Edith Dibble, Murietta Haven, Edith Pat- 
ton, Charlotte Ellinwood, Bertha Bruce, Mr. and Mrs. de 
Ruyter, Ed Sheldon. Ed Greenway, Southard Hoffman, 
Lieuts. Wilcox, Gardner, Butler, Nolan. Benjamin, McCul- 
lough, Roscoe and England; Horace Piatt. George de 
Long, etc. 

On Tuesday evening the hop room at the Presidio was 
charmingly decorated with bunting, Christmas greens and 
red berries for the usual fortnightly hop, which most of 
the season's buds and many of the belles from town en- 
joyed exceedingly. The dancing was kept up till nearly 
midnight, the soldier beaux outdoing their previous efforts 
as hosts, at which they are such adepts; and the Army 
maids and young matrons contributed in no slight degree 
to the attractiveness of the scene. 

On Wednesday evening the first of the long-talk ed-of 
and eagerly anticipated Cinderella Club dances took place 
at Native Sons' Hall. Here, too, the Christmas greens 
and red berries were largely in evidence for decorative 
purposes, and the lady patronesses, Mesdames de Guigne, 
Brigham, Donohoe and Page, received the guests as they 
arrived. These were nearly all of the younger set of 
matrons and unmarried people, and dancing was indulged 
in untiringly from nine o'clock until midnight, when supper 
was served, and the affair was voted a complete success. 

On Wednesday evening took place the pink wedding of 
Miss Carrie L. Gould and Dr. Samuel P. Tuggle. It was 
solemnized at the residence of the bride's parents on Van 
Ness avenue, which was prettily decorated with ferns, 
smilax. and La France roses, the Reverend George C. 
Adams tying the nuptial knot in a bower of huckleberry 
vines placed in the front parlor. The bride, who was 
robed in white satin trimmed with point lace, wore a tulle 
veil and wreath of orange blossoms, and her bouquet was 
composed of the same sweet-scented flowers. Her at- 



tendants were Miss Harriet Gould, as maid-of-honor, the 
Misses Anna Clay and Anna Wainwright, who were at- 
tired alike in gowns of white organdie over white silk, 
and they carried bouquets of pink carnations; the groom 
was supported by Henry F. Gould as best man. A large 
reception followed the ceremony, and a handsome supper 
was served during the evening. The honeymoon is being 
spent at Coronado. 

The chief event of Thursday evening was the musical 
ride of the San Francisco Riding Club. A huge Christmas 
tree was placed in the centre of the tan-barked arena on 
Pacific Avenue, and the Presidio band furnished the music 
for the evolutions of the Club, which was led by Captain 
Dilhan and Mrs. Fanny Lent, the other riders being W. B. 
Chapman and Miss M. Farquharson, Mr. Baker and Miss 
Hooper, Webster Jones and Mrs. G. H. Lent, Mr. Waters 
and Miss Patton, George H. Lent and Mrs. Strickland, 
Henry Bothin and Mrs. Bacon. The guests were enthusi- 
astic in their admiration and demonstrative in applause, 
and after the ride was over refreshments were served. 

The crowning event of Christmas eve was the Fancy 
Dress Cotillion of the Friday Night Club at Native Sons' 
Hall, where the decorations were extremely pretty; red 
gauze, red berries, holly, ferns, incandescent lamps, etc., 
being artistically grouped together, producing a most 
striking and pleasing effect. The cotillion was led by Mr. 
Greenway, with Miss Edna Hopkins — who appeared as 
Folly — as his partner, and four figures, all old favorites, 
were danced- the Cross, Gliding Lines, Concentric Cir- 
cles, and the Christmas tree. The other "Folly's" were 
Miss Ethel Keeney and Miss Sally Maynard; Miss Jolliffe 
represented "Harvard," Miss Alice Moffatt "Yale"; 
Miss Leontine Blakeman appeared as a Butterfly, Miss 
Helen Thomas as a Sunflower, Miss Gertie Bruce as a 
Sailor, Miss Gerty Carrol as a Shepherdess, Miss Alice 
Hoffman as Romola; Miss Helen Smith as the American 
Flag, Miss Charlotte Ellinwood as a Spanish Maiden; Miss 
Mamie Thomas wore a Venetian costume; Miss Marie 
Wells a Colonial dress with poke bonnet: Miss Carrie 
Ayres represented a Watteau Shepherdess; Miss Mollie 
Thomas, Marie Antoinette; Miss Addie Murphy a Baby; 
and Miss Helen Wagner a La France rose. Among the 
young ladies who wore evening gowns with powdered hair 
were the Misses Bernie Drown, Mary Eyre, Romie Wal- 
lace, Frances Curry, Eva Moody, Therese Morgan, May 
Belle. Gwin, and Helen Hopkins. There was a full attend- 
ance of the Club, and the Cotillion was thoroughly enjoyed. 

On Monday afternoon the Philomath Club gave a mu- 
sical reception in the Auditorium of the Christian Associa- 
tion building, and in the evening the wedding of Miss Dora 
Schilling and Alfred Seigfried took place in Beethoven 
Hall. On Wednesday evening Mrs. W. F. Herrin gave a 
cotillion and Mrs. Will Ashe a dance at their respective 
abodes, and Mrs. Goldwater a ball at the Palace Hotel. 

There were two pretty teas on Saturday, the 18th of 
December, one taking place at the Occidental Hotel, 
where Mrs. W. J. Landers and her daughter. Miss Bernice, 
received several hundred callers, assisted by Mrs. Fred 
Tallant, Mrs. C. E. Palmer, Mrs. E. B. Stone, Mrs. G. L. 
Smith and the Misses Bernie Drown, Fanny Baldwin, 
Jessie Glascock, Helen Stubbs, Helen Wagner and Delia 
Davidson. The other tea was given by Mrs. W. B. 
Harrington and her daughters, at their home on Leaven- 
worth street, and was strictly a young people's affair. 
Christmas berries and greens, red ribbons, and red 
shaded lights made a bright warm setting for the receiv- 



When are you going to use Schilling's Best 
baking powder and tea ? 

Your money back if you don't like them. 



January i, 189s. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



25 



log party who. beside the hostesses, were, the Misses 
Beach, Bessie Bowie. May Friecllauder, Genevieve Carolan 
and Alice Bojrgs, who officiated most charmingly as 
"assistants." The same evening Miss Muriel Atlierton 
made her debut as an entertainer, giving a theatre party 
to twenty of her young friends to witness Tht Milk White 
Finn at the Columbia. Mrs. E. E. Eyre acted as chaperon, 
and after the play there was supper at the University 
Club. Miss Atherton's guests were the Misses May Belle 
Gwin, Frances and Miriam Moore, Kate and Maggie 
Salisbury, Clara Hamilton, Florence Josselyn ; Percy King, 
Gerald Rathbone. Albert Russell, Harry Poett, Will 
Howard, and Ed. Greenway. 

All society is interested in the charity pageant which is 
to be presented at the California Theatre next week, and 
which promises to be a erreat success; many of our beaux 
and belles, as well as charming young matrons, will appear 
upon the stage, and all during the past week rehearsals 
have been going on at different residences. At the 
Whittiers those who are to dance the minuet have been in 
constant practise; these are Mrs. Will Whittier, the 
Misses Gerty Carroll, May Hoffman, Therese Morgan, 
Bernie Drown, Ida and Eva Mooney, Mrs. Bayne, L. Van 
Winkle, Fred Greenwood, R. Duperu, C. Follis, Ben Holla- 
day, Ray Sherman, Percy King, and H. Veeder. The 
ladies will wear costumes of white, pink or lavender; the 
gentlemen will be restricted to red. 

It seems fitting that the gayest season that San Fran- 
cisco has known for years should end in a blaze of glory, 
and the indications are most promising that this will be 
the case and a Mardi Gras ball be given at the Art Insti- 
tute after all. Next week will decide the matter and 
many sincerely hope the 22nd of February will see it an 
accomplished fact. 

Mrs. Oelrichs' friends in San Francisco were greatly 
distressed on hearing of the serious accident which befell 
her, but are now delighted to learn that it is not so bad as 
was at first feared, and will not result in loss of sight; but 
in consequence of the accident Miss Marie Wells has for the 
present given up her projected Eastern trip, as it would 
be impossible for Mrs. Oelrichs to receive her as a guest, 
as she had anticipated. 

The festive atmosphere surrounding every place at this 
season whether home, hotel or cafe is nowhere more ap- 
parent than in the Palace Hotel Grill Room. The solid 
comfort a guest can find there combines with appetizing 
fare and elegance in serving to a rare degree; so appar- 
ently thinks the British tourist, Sir Theodore Fry, who is 
a constant attendant at the table there. 

A novel entertainment was that provided by Mrs. Abe 
Miertief at her home, on last Thursday evening, involving 
a culinary contest in which several of the young ladies 
participated. Prizes were awarded to those who pre- 
pared the most delicate dishes. The prize winners were 
Miss Louise Sussman, Miss Clara Hellman, Miss Toosey 
Wangenheim, and Miss Francis Jacoby. 

The jinks given by Mme. Adolphe Roos at her home 
on Christmas eve was one of the most versatile and com- 
plete ever given in the city. Mrs. Marcus Kosbland acted 
as sire and acquitted herself admirably. Amongst the 
more prominent numbers were a sketch by Mrs. Joseph 
Ehrman and Mrs. Charles W. Rosenbaum; an Hebraic 
act, by Mrs. Henry Wangenheim and Mrs. S. W. Ehrman; 
a dude act by Mrs. William Freese and Mrs. Helen Hecht, 
and a performance in magic by the hostess herself, all of 
which provoked much applause. So rigidly were the male 
sex excluded that even the waiters were compelled to 
leave the hall at a given signal, and the musicians dis- 
coursed from behind a screen. 

The San Francisco Verein also gives its annual function, 
which this year takes the form of a burlesque on The First 
Born. In order to strengthen the singing, some of the 
best professional talent of the city has been called in. 

The Hellman dinner on Christmas night was a truly en- 
joyable party. Some forty young folks were present and 
sat down in the beautiful dining-room, where two tables 
were set, presided over by Mrs. I. W. Hellman and Miss 
Clara Hellman, respectively. Decorations were in har- 
mony with the day. Holly abounded. During the repast 
a quartette sang and the orchestra played the popular 




' Tht Ale ol To-Dar" 

EVANS' ALE 

No s'll'inenl. 

EVANS' ALE 

Nol a medicine — better still— a 
good old ale. 

EVANS' ALE 

Hrllllant, clear and sparkling to 
ibe last drop. 

EVANS' ALE 

Contains only what exists in the 
legitimate materials of malt and 
hops from which it Is brewed. 
SHERWOOD & SHERWOOD 

Pacitic Coast Agents 
San FraDcisco, Portland, Los Angeles 



ALBERT MILLER, C. 0. G. MILLER, J. M. LIVINGSTON, 

President. Treasurer. Secretary. 



^Pacific 

Sao 

Smprovement 



Company. 



Manufactures and Sells a 
Superior Quality of 



Got. flnnie and Stevenson Sts. 



GAS 



FOR ILLUMINATING, FUEL, AND 
MANUFACTURING PURPOSES . . . 
IN SAN FRANCISCO 



1 



Mining Machinery 

and SUPPLIES 

THE ROPP STRAIGHT LINE FURNACE. 
HUNTINGTON CENTRIFUGAL ROLLER MILL. 
ENGINES BOILERS, STEAM PUMPS. 
WOOD-WORKING AND IRON-WORKING MACHINERY. 

PARKE, LACY & CO., 

21 and 23 Fremont Street, San Francisco. 

DR. c). NICHOLS, 

(Formerly County Physician of Amador County.) 

Office: 31 Powell street, corner Powell and Ellis. Residence, 

Baldwin Hotel, S. F . Hours : 1 to 4 p. m. ; 7 to 8 p. m. 

has no shading; it has connective 

LitllltrLillC SllOrttldlKl ' i?T^e d llgibV°and n ?asTII\the 
- 1 fastest. Full personal course, 135; 

by mail 115; flrst-olass references; desoriptive' l 3ketoh"free. 
ROSCOE !■. EAMES, Room 556 Parrott Building; telephone Jessie 1011 






SAN FRANCISCO NKWS LETTER. 



January i, 1898. 



aire. After dl r aama thi dl tributlon of presents, and 

li 1 nil' i.iin gift wai 11 hit upon tome foible oharaoter 
I li, of tin iii.j, but attaobed by* ribbon wm 

I1111 beautiful present, which ampl] madi tmendi for 

tho dnlloati pei lal reminder Danolng followed (ill a 

llOUl ft H i!i I uestl "i'I'i 1 Mi' luul Mrs. I. W. 

11, ii<, , lU i 1 \\ (Milium li Dloh Blots, Louis A. Sohwa 
1,11, 1,, -, in I lo Di Rosonan. Henry Irlalaobman. Albert 

11 iui 1 feu tadter, Louis Simon, A, I. Enberg, 

1, ,',,,ii, 1, jinn, Alfred tin en of Now York, Arthur 

11,1,1, iimn, ii,,,,i,,,' Walter, Louli Baai, Joe, Loo we; 
1 iiai 11 oilman ; Jaoobl, Norma Baohman, 

llmullo Nouitudti 1 , M le Hohwabaober. Tooiay Vfangen- 

helm, Stale Heoht, Louise Bussman, Anne Sutro, Alloe 
droenwald, Alloa Baohman, Bills Frank, Graoa Baobt, 
On Mniiiiiiv evening Mlu Qertruda Ettllnger gave a 
delightful theatre part] at bba Baldwin Theatre 
1 nne hundred young people being preaent, Alter 
the performani ■ Ihej were driven bo the Oonoordle Olub. 
where tuppei a In the ladles' parlors, whloh bad 

very oeautlfulli decorated for the 000a Ion, each of 
1 ho 1I1 large round tables being 1 1 hi 10110,1 and arranged In 
Mlas Qertlo made a delightful hostess 
in, 1 » i i'\ her il ten, Ueadamea Straus 

or. who aoted -i ohaparoDM Imongat 

Ruth rreeeleben, Nellie Joseph, 

k.i, iiniiiii, Ella Newhalh Stella 

Matlle Davis, Irma Rolhohlld. Corinne 

Cook iwoll or. Illrdle Htraohman, Belle Strass 

1 , I'.'iho 1 ii \ 1 ,o,iii Greenbaum, Milton 

llromer, Mori r'lolihackpr. Walter Btetthelmer, Ohas*, 

Hi .111,1, ii'.ioin coo i;,»,".. Julius Ai-ii, Julian Newbauer, 

Monr\ Snobs, Kugvne Korn, Arthur 811 verberg, Nathan 

1 Oook, Max Sohwabaoher, Monroe Bohweli 

The Blgmuod B< bwabaohor reoeptlon, al thalr home on 
Jaokion street, Saturday evening a week ago, was one of 
the moil lurceasful of 11 >ii>-. Stella Bohwa 

bacher, the titbuhuih ol ilio evanlng, la quite a striking 
hruueite, ol moal amiable and 1 harming addreas, and bus 
alreadj won for herself a iiosi of friends The decorations 
of a mosl or. Klondike being the subject 

for the evanlng riio young i.t.lios appeared In a 
domlnoe*, h . arded than for their ball costumes. 

The snppei entered over thi out" pass, 

tufas, with all thai 1 
imp in the far north, The 
trimmed with gold. 
Dfcnctug followed the supper 

-sviOvl iltvi- 

plat hi i ho rooms of the San 
1 evening, January TUi. \ 
<\\ the dtuntr 

ternoou andearlv evening of the 19th of Deoem 

1 n tea at 
rrhieli v> is 
- - donee ».»s 

. which » as 

•. the Berks 

lyable, 

amme 

S 
- 



rVxi. »o»i : . .... 



H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS 
Fire and Marine Insurance Agents, 



Uk» 






309 and 311 Sansome St, 



San Francisco, Cal 



CORRESPONDENTS : 

PINDLAY, DURHAM & HHODIE 48 mid -lOTIiroiKlneoillo St.. London 

SIMPSON, MAOKIRDY & 00 SO South Castle St., Liverpool 



INSURANCE. 



FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 



Firemans Fund 



INSURANCE COMPANY, OP SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Capital, $1,000,000. Assets. $3,500,000. 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY iLlmttedl, OP MANCHESTER. ENGLAND. 
•OLIO SECURITY. OVER 98,000,000.00 RESOURCES 

OHAS. A. LATON, Manager 43° California St.. S. P. 

Pun Iiki'iiis, i 



CONNECTICUT FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF HARTFORD. 

Capital Paid Up 11,000.000 

AlltU 3.900,018 

Surplus to Policy Holders 1,668.333 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH. Manager. 
COLIN M, BOYD. §■. W Cor. Sacramento and Montgomery Sts..S- P. 



BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSURANCE CO., LIMITED, 

OP LIVERPOOL. 
Capital 18.700,001 

HAI.POl-K JUTHR1E A CO.. Agents. 

5 California St.. S. T 

Founded A a 1TW. 

Insurance Company ot Nortti flmerlGa 

or iHUjirnij-HiA rnrs. 

Paid up Capital 

Sorntww Policy Holders 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent. «U OalUnrn-.a - 

PHOENIX ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON » 
PROVIDENCE-WASHINGTON INSURANCE CO 

m-TLKK a HALDAN General 

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THE THURIN6IA INSURANCE COMPANY. 

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THE GUARANTORS FINANCE COMPANY OF PHNJIOEIPHIA. 

n kll. , Jea Agent Poes*.- Cons:. «W Cntn os ajn Sa. 



January I, 1898. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



CITY INDEX AND PURCHASER'S GUIDE 

RESTAURANTS. 

Bergex't Restaurant, Academy Building, 334-334 Pine street, below Mont- 
gomery. Rooms for ladies and families; private entrance. John Bergez 
Proprietor. 
Malson Tortoni, French Rot isserie. 111 O'Farrell street. Private dining 

rooms and banquet ball. S. Constantlnl, Proprietor. 
Poodle Dog Restaurant, S. E. cor. Grant ave. and Bush st Private 

dining and banquet rooms. Tel. 4^9 A. B. Blanco & B. Brun. 

Bay State Oyster House and Grill Room, 15 Stockton street and 109 
O'Farrel street. N. M. Adler pnetor Telephone Main 5057. 

DENTISTS. 
Dr. Franklin Pancoast removed to 30 O'Farrell street, rooms 16, 17 & 26 

MEDICAL 
Dr. Hall, 14 McAllister St.. near Jones Diseases of women and children. 

POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS. 
Hawaiian Stamps a specialty. MAKINS & CO 506 Market street. 
Selections on approval: any plaoe in world. W. F. GREANY, 837 Brannan 
The W. H. Holds 8tamp Co., (Incorporated), 105 O'Farrell St., S. F. 

BOILER MAKERS. 
P. F. Dundon's San Francisco Iron Works, 314, 316, and 318 Main street. 
Iron Work of every description designed and constructed. 



Baggage Notice. 



Baggage called for and delivered 
at trains, steamers, etc. Trunks 
35 cents. Baggage called for, 
weighed and checked at your 
Hotel or residence. Trunks 50c. 



PACIFIC TRANSFER CO., 20 Sutter St. 



San Francisco and North Pacific R'y Co. 



SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. Tibukon Ferry- Foot ot Market Street. 
WEEK DAYS— 7:30,9:00, 11:00 ah; 12:35, 3:30 6:10, 6:30 p m. Thursdays- 
Extra trip at 11 :30 P M. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1 :50 and 11 :30 p M. 
SUNDAYS— 8:00,9:30, 11:00 A u: 1:30. 3:30, 5:00. 6:20 p M. 

SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO. 
WEEK DAYS— 6:10, 7:50,9:20, 11:10 am; 12:45, 3:40, 5:10fh. Saturdays- 
Extra trips at 1:55 and 6 :35 pm. 
SUNDAYS— 8:10, 9:40, 11:10 am; 1:40, 3:40,6:00,6:25 p m. 

Between San Francisco and Schuetzen Park, same schedule as above. 



Leave S. F. 


In Eflect Oct. 24, 1897 


ARRIVE IN S. F. 


Week Days. 


Sundays. 


Destination. 


Sundays 

10:40 AM 
6 :10 P M 

7 :35 P M 


Week Days 


7:30am 
3:30pm 
5:10PM 


8:00ah 
9:30 am 

5:00pm 


Novato, 
Fetaluma, 
Santa Rosa. 


8:40 am 
10:25 A M 
6:22 PM 


7:30am 
3:30 PM 


8:00 AM 


Fulton, Windsor, 

Healdsburg, 

Geyserville. Cloverdale 


7:35PM 


10:25 A M 
6:22 P H 



7 :30 AM 


1 8:00am 1 


Hoplaad, Uliiah 


I 7:35 PM 


| 6:22 PM 


7:30a M 
3:30pm 


1 8:00AM 1 


Guernevllle. 


1 7:35pm 


10:25 A M 
6:22 P M 


7:30 am 
5:10pm 


1 8:00AM 1 
| 5:00pm | 


Sonoma, 
Glen Ellen. 


1 10:40am 
1 6:10pm 


8:40 A M 
6:22 P M 


7:30am 
3:30pm 


1 8:00am 1 
I 5:00fm 1 


Sebastopol. 


I 10:40AM 
1 7:35 PM 


10:25 A M 
6:22 P H 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West Springs; at Geyserville 
for Skaggs' Springs; at Cloverdale for the Geysers; at Hopland for High- 
land Springs, Kelseyville, Soda Bay, Lakeport, and Bartlett Springs; at 
Ukiah, for Vichy Springs, Saratoga Springs, Blue Lakes, Laurel Del 
Lake, Upper Lake, Porno, Potter Valley, John Day's, Riverside, Ller- 
ley's, Bucknell's Sashedoin Heights, Hullvllle, Boonevllle, Orr's Hot 
Springs, Mendocino City, Ft. Bragg, Westport, Usal. 

Saturday-to-Monday Round Trip Tickets atreduced rates. On Sundays, 
Round Trip Tickets to all points beyond San Rafael at half rates. 

TICKET OFFICE— 650 Market St., Chronicle Building. 
A. W. FOSTE R, Pres. & Gen. Manager. R. X. RYAN, Gen. Pass . Agent. 

Pacific Coast Steamship Co. 

Steamers leave Broadway Wharf, San Franelsco for ports In Alaska, 
9 A. m., December, 2. 7, 12, 17, 23, 27, and every 5th day thereafter. 

For British Columbia and Puget Sound ports, 9 A. H., December 2, 
7, 12, 17, 23, 27, and every 5th day thereafter. 

For Eureka (Humboldt Bay), Steamer "Pomona," 2 P. M., December 
3, 7, 11, 15, 20, 24, 28. January 1,5, 10, 14, 18, 22, 26, 31. 

For Newport, (Los Angeles) and all way ports, 9 a. m. ; Dec. 2, 6, 10, 
14,18,22,28,30, and every fourth day thereafter. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Port Harford Santa Barbara, Port Los 
Angeles, Redondo, (Los Angeles) 11 A. m., Dec. 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24, 28, and 
every fourth day thereafter. 



The company reserves the right to change, without previous notice, 
■ling '-■ 



For ports in Mexico. 10 A. if., 2d of each month 
The company reserves the right to chang 
steamers, sailing dates, and hours of sailing 

TICKET OFFICE— Palace Hotel, No. 4 New Montgomery street. 
G00DALL. PERKINS & CO., Gen. Agts., 10 Market St., San Franclsoo 



Southern Pacific Co. --Pacific System. 

Trains Leave and are Due to Arrive at BAN FRANCISCO: 
^ (Main Line. Foot of Morkot Streot.) 



Isnit 



From October 24, 1891. 



I Arrive 



•6:00 A Niles.San Jose, and way stations 8:46 A 

7:0Ua Benicia Suisun, and Sacramento 10:45 A 

7:00 A Marysville. Orovtlle. and Redding, via Woodland 5:45 p 

7:00 a Vacavllle and Rumsey 8:46 P 

7:3UA Martinez, San Ramon, Vullejo.Napa, Calistoga, Santa Rosa 6:16P 

8:00 a Atlantic Express, Ogdenand East 8:45 P 

8:30 a Nlles, San Jose, Stockton, lone, Sacramento, Marysville, 

Chico, Tehama, and Red Bluff 4:16p 

•8:80 a Peters, Milton, and Oakdale *7:16p 

9:00a New Orleans Express, Merced, Raymond, Fresno, Bakers- 
field, Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, Demlng, El Paso, New 

Orleans, and East 6:46P 

Vallejo, Martinez, Merced, and Fresno 12:15 p 

Sacramento River steamers *9 :00 p 

Martinez and Way Stations 7:45p 

Livermore, Mendo&a, Hanford, and Visalia 4 :16 p 

Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, Napa, Callstoga, El Verano 

and Santa Rosa 9:15 a 

Benicia, Vacaville, Woodland, Knight's Landing, Marys- 
ville, Orovl lie, and Sacramento 10:45 A 

Niles, Tracy, and Stockton 7:15 p 

Lathrop, Modesto, Merced, Berenda, Fresno, Mojave (for 

Randsburg), Santa Barbara and Los Angeles 7:45A 

Santa Fe Route, Atlantic Express, for Mojave and East 6:45p 

'• Sunset Limited." Los Angeles, El Paso, Fort Worth, Lit- 
tle Rock, St. Louis, Chicago, and East §10 :16 a 

European mail, Ogden and East 9 :45 A 

Haywards, Niles and San Jose 7:46A 

Vallejo f7:45P 

Oregon Express, Sacramento, Marysville, Redding, Port- 

land, Puget Sound and East .... 8:15 A 



9:00 A 
•1:00 P 
1:30 P 
2:00 p 
4:00p 

•1:00 p 

4:30p 
4:30p 

4:30P 
15 :3JP 

6 :00P 
6:00 P 

J8:0UP 
8:00P 



San Lkandro and Haywards Local. (Foot of Market St.) 


i«6:00 Al 
8:00A 


MELROSE, 


7:15 A 


Seminary Park, 


(9:45 A 


9:00 A 


FlTCHBtfRG, 


10:45 A 


10:00 A 


ELMHURST, 


11:45 A 


ill .00 A 


San Leandro. 


12:45 P 


(12:00 M 


South San Leandro, 


(1:45 P 


il:00 P 


ESTUDILLO, 


12:45 P 


i3:00 P 


Lorenzo, 


(4:45 P 


4:00 p 


Cherry, 


(6:45 P 


5:00 p 


and 


6:15 p 


5:30 p 


Haywards. 


7:45 P 


7:00 P 




8:45 P 


8:00 P 


i Runs through to Nlles. 


9:45 P 


9:00 P 


t From Nlles. 


10:50 p 


ttH:16P 




ittl2:00 p 



Coast Division (Narrow Gauge). (Foot of Market St.)r 

8 :15 A Newark, Centerville, San Jose, Felton, Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruz and way stations 5:50P 

*2:15p Newark, Centerville, San Jose, New Almaden, Felton, Boul- 
der Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal way stations *10:5ua 

4 :15p Newark, San Jose and Los Gatos 9:30> 

tll:45P Hunters' Excursion, San Jose and Way Stations- f?:20p 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY. ~~ 

From San Francisco— Foot of Market street (Slip 8).— *7:15, 9:00. and 
11:00 a. M.,J1:00, *2:00. 13:00. *4:O0, 15:00 and *6:00p. m. 

From Oakland— Foot of Broadway.— *8:00, 8:00, 10:00 a. m.; 112:00, *1:00. 
t2:00,*3:00, 14:00 *5:0Qp. m. 

Coast Division (Broad Gauge)'. (Third and TownBend stree ts). 

6:55 a San Jose and way stations (New Almaden Wednesdays only) 6 :55 A 
9:00 a SanJose.Tres Plnos, Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove, Paso Robles 

San Luis Obispo, Guadalupe, Surf and principal way stations 4 : 15 * 

10:40 A San Jose and way stations *8":00 A 

11 :S0 A San Jose and way stations , 8 :35 a 

♦2:30 P San Mateo, Redwood, Menlo Park. Santa Clara. San Jose, 
Gllroy, Hollister, Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, Pacific 

Grove *I0:40a 

*3:15p San Jose and Principal Way Stations *9:00 a 

*4 :15 p San Jose and Principal Way Stations 9 :45 a 

*5 :00 p San Jose and Principal Way Stations l :30 P 

6 :30 p San Jose and principal way stations 5 :30 p 

6 :30 P San Jose and way stations 7 :30 P 

til :45p San Jose and way stations 7 :30 p 

A for Morning, p for Afternoon. *Sundays excepted. tSaturdays only. 

JSundays only . tt Monday , Thursday, and Saturday nights only. 

^Mondays and Thursdays. ^Wednesdays and Saturdays. 

The Pacific Transfer Company will call for and check baggage from 
hotels and residences. Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time Cards and 
other information. 

Occidental and Oriental Steamship Co. 

; FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. » 

Steamers leave wharf, FIRST and BRANNAN STREETS, at 1 p m., for 

YOKOHAMA AND HONGKONG, 

calling at Kobe (Hio£0), Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting at 

Hongkong with steamers for India, etc. No cargo reoeived on board on 

dayof sailing. 

Doric (via Honolulu) Tuesday, December 28; 1 897 

Belg ic (via Honolulu) Saturday, January 15, 1898 

Coptic Thursday, February 3, 1898 - 

Gaelic (via Honolulu) Tuesday, February 22> 1898 

Round Trip tickets at Reduced Rates. 

For freight or passage apply at Company's Office, No. 421 Market street, 
oorner First. D. D. STUBBS, Sec retary. 

S S "Australia", for Honolulu only, Tuesday 
December uath^ at 2 p M'. 
S. S. "Moana," Thursday, Januarys, 1898. 
Line to Coolgardle, Australia, and Capetown 
South Africa. 

J. D. SPRECKELS &BROS. CO., 
Agents, 114 Montgomery St. Freight office, 723 
Market St., San Francisco, 



|AN!C 




(gnpiuj- 



23 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January i, 1898 



THE SANITARY REDUCTION WORKS. 

ONE of the most useful enterprises that has been com- 
pleted in San Francisco, (and without the bluster and 
noise that so often characterize the inception of concerns 
of similar importance), are the SaDitary Reduction Works, 
located and occupying a whole square at the foot of 
Eighth street. As the name implies, the Sanitary Reduc- 
tion Works are built for the purpose of destroying all the 
refuse and garbage of the city by fire and reduction, and 
accomplishing the work in a quick and sanitary manner. 
The company was formed a little more than one year ago, 
and, since the day of its organization and the granting of 
a franchise, it has expended $200,000 in the purchase of 
ground and the buildings of an incinerating and fertilizing 
plant capable of treating about 700 tons of refuse and 
garbage each twenty-four hours without the use of any 
fuel of any kind. This is the only plant where they treat 
all kinds of refuse and garbage as collected by the scaven- 
gers without the aid of fuel. The plant is known as The 
Thackeray Incinerating and Fertilizing Systems. 

The Reduction Works have been a success from the 
start. They have accomplished a great sanitary better- 
ment in the city. The disease-breeding and foul-smelling 
dumps, where formerly the refuse and garbage gatherers 
deposited their hundreds of loads daily, are superceded 
by the incinerating and fertilizing plant, where the refuse 
and garbage of a great city is burned and reduced, and 
made into fertilizer, etc., and a menace to the health of the 
people removed. This plant has been inspected by the 
State Board of Health of California, and the City Board of 
Health, and approved by them as the best sanitary way of 
disposing of the refuse and garbage for the city of San 
Francisco. Scavengers from all parts of the city deliver 
the refuse and garbage at the works, paying the company 
an average of forty cents per ton for burning and fertiliz- 
ing it. This is a lower price than is charged in any other 
city in the United States of America. It costs from 
ninety-five cents to two dollars and thirty cents per ton to 
dispose of garbage in other cities. 

The company employs steadily about 200 men, and, while 
the works are complete and adequate for the needs of the 
present, the requirements of the future will always be 
promptly anticipated. The completion of the Sanitary Re- 
duction Works are largely due to the energy and ability 
of Ex-Mayor Ellert, who. when he was in office, had occa- 
sion to thoroughly study the garbage problem of San Fran- 
cisco. The works are a blessing to the city, and the men 
whose enterprise and money made the plant possible are 
deserving of the greatest credit; Jor 
they have removed a constant and j 
dangerous menace to the health and j 
lives of the citizens, have increased 
the value of the land in the vicinity of 
their works, and have given the city 
the latest and most perfect plant for 
the sanitary reduction of its constantly 
accumulating garbage. 



A good lamp-chimney deal- 
er keeps Macbeth and no 
other. 

Index tells what Number to 
get. 

Write Macbeth Pittsburgh P» 



j(K>0<>000<K)«<><>0000<>000<>00-<>0<>0<><><><>000<><>0)( 

i 1 ANDY CATHARTIC 

CURE CONSTIPATION 



Constipation Afflicts 

part of the people all the time, 
all the people part of the time. 
Are you a chronic or occasional sufferer from constipation ? 1 
Do you want a sure, pure cure ? 

CASCARETS (eat 'em like candy) will stimulate | 
your liver, regulate your bowels, leave your 
blood clean and rich, sweeten your breath and . 
make your stomach do its work. 

CASCARETS kill disease germs, cure; 

sick headache, taste good and do good, please J 
the children, destroy and drive off worms and 1 
other parasites. 

A ioc box will prove their merit, and put you on i 
the right road to perfect and permanent health. Try ', 
a ioc box to-day I If not pleased, get your money 
back. Larger boxes, 25c or 50c. 



BOOKLET AND 
SAMPLE 

FRFE 
FOR THE 
ASKING. 




The 
only Genuine. 
Beware of 
imitations ! 



ADDRESS 

Sterling Remedj Co. 

CHICAGO OR 
NEW YORK. 255 



5o<KKHX>0<><><XKX>CKXX><>0<>00<><><X>0<>CK><><><><>CKK>0 



T 



HE movement on foot in the city 



urday and Sunday Hospital Associa- 
tion is meeting with liberal co-oper- 
ation throughout the city. There are 
three hundred boxes in the stores 
about town for contributions, and 
those who desire to aid a good cause 
can 6nd no more certain way of doing 
it than by dropping their surplus cash 
into them. The institutions to be bene- 
fited by these offerings are the 
Woman's and Children's Hospital, the 
King's Daughters' Home for Incura- 
bles, and Mount Zion Hospital. 

WM. CORBIN, Secretary and Gen- 
eral Manager of the Continental 
Building and Loan Association of Cali- 
fornia, is sending out a very handsome 
calendar as " a little remembrance 
for kind expressions toward our Asso- 
ciation by you during the past year." 



The Delicate 
Woman 




Simple and compact* this machine is 
more easilv understood, its parts are 
belter protected from dust, it has 
more room under the arm, and is cap- 
able of a greater range of work, than 
any similar device. 



unable to operate the ordinary 
form of sewing-machine without 
fatigue, can use the SILENT 
SINGER AUTOMATIC with the 
greatest ease. The acme of per- 
fection in construction and artistic 
finish, this machine is positively 
the lightest-running of any. Its 
low, broad treadle enables frequent 
change in position of the feet, or 
it can be furnished in a portable 
form to be effectively run by hand 
if desired. It has neither shuttle 
nor bobbin, and no tensions toad- 
just, but is ready for use when the 
needle is threaded. 

The Silent Singer 

has many points of preference that can 
easily be demonstrated by examination 
and comparison with similar machines. 

Sold only by 

The Singer Mfg. Co. 

Offices in Entry City in the World. 



Price per Copy. 10 Cents. 



Annual Subscription, $4.00 





** N 'J^S? 1 *** 







Vol.LYI. 



SAN FRANCISCO, JANUARY S, 189$. 



Number 2. 



Print-dand Pubtitluaecery Saturday by'ht proprietor. FEED MARRIOTT 
6% Kearny street. San Francisco. E tiered at San Francisco rost- 
office at Second-clots Matter. 

The office of the SEWS LETTER in Xsw Tort City it at Temple Court; 
and at Chicago. 903 Boyce B'ti'.ding, (Frank E Morrison, Eastern 
Rep'esenta'ice), where informatiyn maybe obtained regarding subscrip- 
tion and advertising rates. 

IF the New 8 Letter were to reproduce all the compli- 
mentary notices that the press of the State has pub- 
lished concerning the Christmas uumbei, there would be 
space for little else. The very wealth of our contempo- 
raries' appreciation prevents more than a general acknowl- 
edgment. The News Letter desires to express sincere 
thanks to the papers of California for their kind words, 
and, although a little late, none the less heartily, wish them 
every one a prosperous year. 

THE gentle rains which fall upon the just and the un- 
just alike are bringing assurance of bountiful crops 
throughout the State; the orange groves are filled with 
fruits, the mines are yielding yellow millions, the Alaska 
and the Goiden Jubilee committees are reporting progress 
-and subscriptions. Surelv 1S9S opens with every promise 
of plenty, prosperity and peace. The Jubilee month should 
be made a Jubilee year, and the Silurian crawl away and 
join the extinct races of prehistoric times. 

THOSE madmen who are now rushing toward Alaska 
will have cause for bitter regret at their unwise 
haste. Nothing can be gained by daring the tierce storms, 
intense cold, and indeseribab'e privations that lie in wait 
at every pass and mountain trail from tide-water to Daw- 
son City. These impatient adventurers had far better 
come to San Francisco, select their supplies in a rational 
manner, and linger until the advancing season unlocks the 
barriers that now oppose their journey. At best they 
will find all the experience they want, whether they dis- 
cover any gold or not. To start for the Yukon now is to 
waste money and exhaust energy in a losing and possibly 
a fatal 6ght. 

THE head master of St. Matthew's School at San 
Mateo preached a sermon on football to his students 
when the season was at its height. The sermon was put 
into type, and in pamphlet form is now being circulated. 
The minister endeavored to driw a comparison between 
the struggles of players on the gridiron and the battle with 
the devil that all men are supposed to have in the wide 
world. The circulation of the pamphlet is quite oppor- 
tune: We note that an ambitious and promising young 
man of Redding, in this State, has just succeeded in having 
his neck broken in a football game at that place. The head 
master might have drawn a less sanguinary but equally 
as fitting a parable from the prize ring. 

THE Supervisors have receded from their temporary 
commendable resolve against prize-fighting in San 
Francisco, and have opened the gates to these disgraceful 
and brutal contests. The good sense, the moral tone, and 
self-respecting sentiment of this city are all overwhelmingly 
against these animal exhibitions; and the disreputable, 
rowdy element that demands them is totally unworthy of 
consideration. The insignificant license paid for the city's 
good name bears no proportion to the offense committed 
against decency, and any price would be far too small. 
Now we shall have repeated the disgusting pictures, the 
biceps, legs, torsos, and ugly mugs of the bruisers from 
Africa to Ireland, which wili fill the daily papers, be thrust 
into every defenseless home in San Francisco, and outrage 
every sense of refinement. 



THE courts should make an example of those men who 
have been arrested a second time for selling immature 
veal and diseased meats in this city. The offenders es- 
caped their first offense with a light line. They should be 
given the full limit of the law for their crimes. The offense 
is a most serious one. The man who knowingly sells 
diseased meat is a positive and most repulsive menace to 
public health, and deserves not only to be heavily lined, 
but sent to jail as well. Dockery and the Health Board 
should be sustained by every power of the laws. 



THE New York correspondent of the News Letter 
imparts the reassuring information that 100,000 Bibles 
were sent to California in the year just closed. We heart- 
ily commend the zeal of our Christian brethren, but hardly 
know whether to regard their action as a sublime and 
touching exhibition of faith in the power of Holy Writ, or 
an ignorance of the conditions that prevail west of the 
Rocky Mountains. Seriously, there is much that is inspir- 
ing iu the thought that the Word in its expanding circula- 
tion throughout the world measures many fold the best and 
most popular works of men — even as its mighty iufluence 
overshadows and dwarfs the efforts of all that is mutable 
in human destiny. 

THE City and County Hospital of this city has long 
been recognized as a distinct, inhuman, and positive 
disgrace to San Francisco; and Dr. Williamson, of the 
Board of Health, has just reviewed that institution in the 
public press, and, if possible, given a more comprehensive 
view of its utterly wretched condition. Rotten founda- 
tions, sinking floors; dark and gloomy at nightfall, oppres- 
sive, offensive, and disease-laden at all times, our City 
and County Hospital welcomes with outstretched hands to 
frequent graves the doubly unfottunate who enter its 
hopeless shadows. The institution is not a hospital at all; 
it is a death-trap — a sort of apartmented-coffin, and those 
who are compelled to go there for treatment are more to 
be pitied than others who hide within their poverty and 
disease, and wait for the approach of a death that is un- 
aided by artificial encouragement. 

THE Golden Jubilee Committee estimates that $20,000 
will be enough to give a creditable exhibition in this 
city the last week of this month. Considering the direct 
benefits to the business interests of San Francisco by this 
week of celebration, there should be no trouble in quickly 
securing the sum named. The demand for subscriptions is 
two-fold. It appeals with peculiar force to the patriotism 
and personal pride of Californians, and really affords an 
opportunity to make a safe business investment. Perhaps 
it is just as well that the demand is double-headed. In 
view of the exceeding deliberation with which the business 
community usually responds to the ordinary call of enter- 
prise, appeal of civic pride, or the urgent exigency of com- 
mercial gain, we hope that this extraordinary occasion 
may awaken an interest worthy of it. There is little time 
to iose. To make it an advertisement and a success, to at- 
tract attention and bring permanent results, those having 
charge of the Golden Jubilee must know very soon the en- 
tire amouut of money at their disposal. Twenty thousand 
dollars is not much money when put over against the occa- 
sion and its varied possibilities. Business in this city has 
been good, is improving, and promises to be better. Let 
us meet the coming wave that McKinley promised half 
way by booming the Jubilee and advertising the fact that 
San Francisco is on the map and in the fight fully equipped 
for the Alaska trade of 1898. Such public spirit might be 
surprising :: it would also be salutary. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 8, 1898. 



GREAT BRITAIN'S STAND. 

THE Government of Great Britain, contrary to its cus- 
tom, but for reasons not difficult to understand, has 
given out for publication, a semi-official statement of its 
attitude in regard to the attempted partition of China by 
Russia ana Germany. It is a state paper that arrests 
the attention of the world. It is likely to prove, in its con- 
sequences, the most remarkable pronunciamento issued in 
modern times by a great nation; with the possible excep- 
tion of Abraham Lincoln's proclamation abolishing slavery. 
It insures to four hundred millions of people the owner- 
ship of themselves, their country and their trade and 
commerce. It guarantees that so long as Great Britain 
shall be a power on the earth, all nations shall have equal 
rights to trade, travel, and intercourse with all partsof 
the Chinese Empire. With no uncertain voice, Great 
Britain declares that all her treaties with China were 
based upon this policy, and that she had seen to it that 
all China's treaties, were for her own protection, couched 
in like terms; so that if any power seized territory, trade 
monopolies, mining or railroad privileges, to the exclu- 
sion of other powers from like privileges, treaties would 
thereby be violated, and justifiable cause of war would 
thereupon arise. It was a simple, but far reaching policy, 
the wisdom of which is now apparent. For the moment 
England stands alone among European powers, but pre- 
pares to fight all the same. She names Germany and 
Russia as violators of treaties, and serves notice upon 
them that she will proceed to hostilities. She thus de- 
clares herself: — 

" Great Britain will refuse to recognize any special rights granted 
at any Chinese port to any particular power. Any port opened to 
one power must be opened to ail, or to none." 

" If Russia has been granted the light to winter ships at Pert 
Arthur. Great Britain will enforce ber rights to the same privileges 
and her ships will winter there whether China concedes or dees not 
concede the right." 

'• If Germany obtains a naval station at Kiaocbau. Great Britain 
will insist upon a lease of ground for a naval station at the same port, 
and she will support every other power making the same claim." 

" The contention of the British Government is that "the most 
favored nation clause" in the British and all other treaties with 
China, forbid and were intended to forbid, any special concessions 
in the nature contemplated by Germany at Kiacchau." 

1 The Government declares that the same principle applies to such 
transactions as railroad and mining monopolies. Taking her 
stand upon the treaties, Great Britain refuses to acknowledge such 
concessions, and will insist upon all that the mest favored nation 
clause implies, including internal railroad and mining monopolies, 
and will use such force to procure and defend them as may be 
necessary. " 

That is a lucid and unmistakable exposition of a great 
policy. It leaves nobody in doubt as to its meaning, and 
it has the undoubted merit of suiting everybody, except 
Russia and Germany. It particularly accommodates the 
United States, and leaves our jingoes no chance to go 
wrong. We have a treaty with China conferring upon us 
precisely the rights asserted by Great Britain. We wel- 
comed the negotiation of that treaty with loud acclaim, 
banqueted its negotiator, the late Anson Burlinghame, 
in this city and in other cities of the Union, with an enthu- 
siasm that was remarkable, and sent him on his way re- 
jo : cing at the warm ratification of bis work by Congress 
and the people. Yet when two marauders among the 
ually enter upon the demolition of China and 
the extinguishment thereby of alt that we gained by our 
much 1 elebrated treaty, we have not so far uttered one 
word of protest. Yet us we confront the Pacific Ocean, 
we have great present and future interests involved. Our 
with China and Japau to-dav exceeds that of Russia 
and Germany combined. If China is to be free to all alike, 
and upon equal terms, we may be very sure that in open 
lion the superiority of American workmat.ship would 
come out ahead in the enormous railroad and mining de- 
velopment that is rendered certain by the opening up of 
I hina. It is at least worth the while of our Government to 
fire oil a paper bullet announcing that it takes the same 
views of its treaty rights as does Great Britain. For 
China to be occupied by a European power 1 r powers would 
be to change the destiny of the Pacific to our disadvantage. 

Inscrutable, and past all finding out, are the wavs of 
European diplomacy. They have been described as a "chess 



board, which, as everybody knows, permits an incalculable 
number of moves, surprises, and uncertainty as to what 
may happen next. There can be no doubt that this Chinese 
demolition question has been on the tapis, ever since Rus- 
sia, Germany and France so suddenly stepped in and rob- 
bed Japan of the splendid fruits of her heroic victories. 
But some sort of a division of spoils had to be arranged, 
and that pretty obviously has been the real difficulty with 
which the European concert has all this while been strug- 
gling. The Greek and the Turk were held out as an ex- 
cuse for over a year's confabulation. The outside world 
could not comprehend why so much time was being wasted 
on subjects so little by powers so great, and the European 
concert was laughed to scorn. That, however, was be- 
cause the moves being made on the chess board were not 
known. England has been derided all the while by the 
powerful press of America as no longer having prestige or 
power in the councils of the nations. To all of which her 
attitude to-day is the sufficient answer. What she has 
passed through during this long but secret trouble we may 
never know, but what we do know is that she has brought 
on the inevitable war just where, when, and how she 
wanted it, and, above all, she stands right before the 
world. 

Russia and Germany are the aggressors; their proceed- 
ings amount to acts of war, yet there may be no war after 
all, but only because Kiaochau Bay and Port Arthur may 
be vacated by the two hot-headed youths who were re- 
cently lauded as giving law to Europe, Asia, Africa, and 
all the rest of mankind. If they vacate, that of course 
ends the matter. But every care appears to have been 
taken to prevent any backing out. The aggressors were 
permitted to go ahead until tbey were fully committed to 
a belligerent course. The fight is ready to their hands; 
it must take place at the points where they threw down 
the gage of battle, and must, from the nature of the posi- 
tion, take place at sea and around great forts. It has 
been said that it will be the greatest sea fight the world 
ever saw. We do not think so. 

Congress at Congress is so made up that nothing 
Loggerheads, seems left to it but to agree to disagree. 
It is irreconcilable upon the three most 
important questions before it, namely, currency reform, 
Hawaiian annexation, and a general bankruptcy law. In 
regard to the financial question, the trouble is that it has 
over $560,000,000 of silver on its hands that it does not 
know what to do with. Disguise it as we may, the Gov- 
ernment's money consists mainly of a commodity for which 
there is no immediate market. Parties are divided as to 
what is best to be done with it. Some are for issuing it as 
fiat money at the rate of 100 cents for each 42 cents' 
worth of silver. Others see in this repudiation, ruin and 
wide-spread bankruptcy. One party holds the House, 
while the other carries the Senate. Hence, there is a 
deadlock, during which nothing can be done. That silver 
is there, and as long as it remains it will throw a cloud of 
doubt upon our finances. When a merchant is loaded up 
with an article of falling value, he unloads secretly, often 
gradually, and always with as much circumspection as 
possible. Could Uncle Sam follow a better example? Un- 
fortunately, under our methods of government no such 
process is possible. The facts must be created by Con- 
gress and blazoned forth to the world. We can accomplish 
no secret monetary transaction. We could not buy the 
control of the Suez canal in a night, as Disraeli did, and as 
long as that condition of affairs lasts, we cannot be an 
effective financial power; just as no merchant could be 
who had to advertise his financial operations weeks or 
months in advance. When we come to unload our silver, 
as some day we must, we shall have to expose our hand as 
to what we really meant by "international bimetallism." 
The Sherman act was a terrible blunder, with which Con- 
gress is not yet ready to grapple. 

The Hawaiian annexation treaty is a bold, bad measure, 
conceived in jobbery, intended to be enforced in robbery, 
and consummated in bribery; it cannot command the re- 
quisite majority for its constitutional ratification. Des- 
perate men fly to desperate means, and annexation is to 
take place by methods outside the Constitution. The ad- 
vice of the early Fathers is to be ignored, the opposition of 
all the really independent journals in the country set 




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January 8, 1898 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER, 



at naught, and a weak spot 1 reated in the armor of the 
United States that will be indefensible against the at1 

of any third-rate power. 

The United States has long badly needed a general 
bankruptcy law. For want of such a measure the com- 
merce of the country is greatly impeded. The Tor rev 
Bill has received more indorsements than any measure 
ever submitted to Congress, and has four or live times 
<1 the House, only to lie rejected by a small majority 
in the Senate. The other day that body passed, without 
debate, the Nelson Bill, which is stamped with fraud from 
beginning to end. Of course it will not pass the House, 
and we shall continue under a condition of law by which 
no honest creditor can collect a debt from a rascally 
debtor. No good is to come of this Congress, as none has 
come of several last past. Had the three last adminis- 
trations been without a Congress, this country would have 
been more prosperous, happier, and better in every way. 
In the nation, as in our own State, we have too many laws. 
We are cursed with legislators who have no conception of 
the real requirements of the country; or if they have the 
breadth and grasp of statesmen, their usefulness is de- 
stroyed by party ties, pledges and personal ambitions. 

The Hearst The committee having in charge the 
University Plans. Phoebe Hearst architectural plan for 
the University of California has sent 
out a circular letter asking the prompt co-operation of 
the press of the State, and of San Francisco particularly. 
in bringing the great importance of the scheme before the 
world. The programme for the proposed international 
architectural competition is very elaborate, and sets out, 
with great particularity, the ambitious and praiseworthy 
intention of Mrs. Hearst and her fellow trustees. Pre- 
liminary and final competitions will be held, and twenty- 
four countries are invited to enter for the prizes. The 
architects successful in preliminary competition will be 
provided with free transportation to this city, as well as 
other expenses, from their homes and return. This is for 
the purpose of permitting them to study the grounds at 
the State University, so that there may be symmetrical 
proportion and architectural harmODy in this splendid 
home of learning that it is proposed to rear overlooking 
the Golden Gate. 

The growth of a great educational institution must be 
gradual. The committee desires to see the end — the com- 
pleted work — from the beginning. No attempt will be 
made to undertake the entire structural plan at once; but 
when the work is once under way it will proceed gradu- 
ally and grandly to the completed conception. Certainly 
no more beautiful site could be chosen in the whole country 
for such an institution. It is ideal. Commanding an emi- 
nence at the immediate foot of the Berkeley hills, upon 
gently sloping and moderate elevations, overlooking San 
Francisco Bay and the entrance to the harbor, the Univer- 
sity grounds afford a theme for the loftiest architectural 
effects. The prizes for the accepted plans will aggregate 
$20,000, and, added to the high honor of acceptance over 
the world's competitive efforts, should not fail to bring out 
the best talent of the present time. The programme is 
printed in English, French, and German. 

Facts About That the recent outcry against the gas in use 
Gas. in this city was without merit is evidenced 

by the fact that numberless households use 
it without cause of complaint. Of course, caution is neces- 
sary in the use of any illuminant, except that of pure at- 
mospheric air. All else needs to be used, and not abused. 
Gas was, and is, intended for the benefit of sane, sober, 
and fairly intelligent people. It causes death from asphyxi- 
ation, but not from poisoning. It is not the element in 
which man was destined to live, move, and have his being. 
If consumed at the end of a burner its existence is ended, 
and no danger lurks around the bedroom. If it is not turned 
off properly, but is blown out by the breath of a lunatic or 
a drunkard, or one intent upon suicide, it is, of course, a 
menace to life. But the world would stand still if noth- 
ing could be manufactured that such classes could not 
abuse. In fact, the progress of the age, in all sorts 
of inventions, is constantly creating a greater need of 
intelligence and sobriety on the part of its popula- 
tion. In the mere crossing of Market street there 



Im-ks more danger than to the use of all the 
manufactured and distributed throughout the thousands of 
homes in San Prancisi The pi company I 

long and faithfully served this community thai the several 
attempts to gel up opposition against it have failed for 
wantofpublii support. It buys the beat gas coal that 
- to this market, charges rates thai only suffice to 
pay a reasonable dividend upon the capital invested, and 
bo far has enlarged its mains to reach all parts of the city. 
It has met its obligations fully. Its methods of manufac- 
ture are the best known to science. .Much at one time 
was said about the preference to be given to pure coal 
gas ami that which is purified through water. But the 
purification system has long since won the day, and now 
holds the field. It is needless to quote authorities to prove 
this. The fact is well enough known to every obsening 
man. Our local company has adopted the water purifica- 
tion system, supplies the safest of gas. and beyond that it 
can do nothing further for all who go to bed sober, sane 
and sedate. The sensational efforts were made largely for 
the purpose of depreciating the stock of the gas company 
— a process so old and familiar that it was at once recog- 
nized. That it has proven abortive shows that the public 
at large and men in authority well understand the ulterior 
motives beneath the assault. 

The State's From present indications the threatened 
Present Need drought will be averted, as the rain fall 
bids fair to be copious and general. The 
rainfall, up to date, has been totally inadequate to the pro- 
duction of paying crops. How much there is in this, we den- 
izens of the city do not perhaps fully realize. It is all the dif- 
ference between dimes and dollars: between profit and loss 
to the great husbandry of the State. How great the de- 
ficiency is has not yet been published, but from Benicia to 
Woodland there has been for the season only an average 
of three inches, while the rainfall over the same area up 
to date last year amounted from twenty to thirty-seven 
inches. Less than ten or twelve inches in that warm belt 
will not produce average crops. In the region alluded to, 
the land, in this middle of winter, is hard and baked. 
What is now wanted is a week's steady downpour, and 
then everything would be lovely for another fruitful year. 
How much would be created by such a week's experience 
it would be. difficult to estimate. We have our weather 
gauges, but have, so far, invented no similar method of 
measuring the difference in production. Yet all eyes can 
see and appreciate the difference. It makes itself appar- 
ent in the straggling, half-grown fruits upon the tree, and 
those bright in color, immense in size, and plentiful enough 
to break down the branches unless the tree be propped 
up. When the rain sets iu late, it invariably continues be- 
yond theusual date. Rains that begin after the new year 
frequently continue up to April or May. If this year prove 
no exception to the general rule, all will be well. 

Our Immigration Laws. The immigration law was never 
intended to work a hardship 
upon people who were able to protect themselves and who 
were in a position to provide for themselves. Last week 
an Austrian woman, whose husband is already here, en- 
tered the port of New York with two children who were 
afflicted with a scalp disease. The authorities refused 
them a landing, and they were promptly deported from 
this country. The husband declared his ability to take 
care of his family so that they should not become a public 
charge; but, despite every protest, they were sent back. 
If this can be done, and the immigration officers bad ample 
authority for their action from Washington, the steam- 
ship companies should be held responsible for giving trans- 
portation to people thus afflicted. The husband had pre- 
pared a home for the reception of his wife and children, 
and being but a mechanic on small salary, had probably 
saved enough for their journey — what, then, will be the 
position of the woman when she is returned to Rotterdam, 
several hundreds of miles away from her home? The 
steamship people should be well acquainted with our immi- 
gration laws, and it is their duty to refuse transportation 
to people whom they know will not be permitted to land. 
But it is their evident wish not to do so, and some action 
should be taken by this Government in forcing these com- 
pauies to respect this law. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 8, 1898. 



A Study in The marriage of Lady Anne Coventry 

Black and White, with Prince Dhuleep Singh makes, 
perhaps, the most singular match in 
the history of English aristocratic society. As far as 
good blood is concerned, and ancient family, the ad- 
vantage lies on the side of the Prince, but there is a very 
strong feeling in England against "black blood," as our 
friends across the water call any person of Asiatic descent, 
and should there be any issue from the marriage the 
children would be recognized as "half-castes." So strong 
was this prejudice in the days when India was ruled by 
the Honorable East India Company, that no person wiih 
native blood was permitted to hold office in that country. 
The aristocracy of England is a conglomerate mixture. It 
is composed from all classes, and there is hardly a family 
which can claim pure Anglo-Saxon or Norman descent; 
but this late introduction promises to bring in a new and 
hitherto unrecognized element. The phrase unrecognized 
element is used advisedly, for the present Lord Gardiner 
is a native of India. Though his claim to tie tit e was 
recognized, yet he was not permitted to enjoy the income 
arising from bis patrimony and the estates which went 
with the title, and the present Lord Gardiner is an ignor- 
ant agriculturalist living on a small farm in Hattras, 
India. Prince Dhuleep Singh is a Punjabi of a noble and 
distinguished family, so distinguished indeed was his 
grandfather, "the Lion of the Punjab," that he fought 
the English to a stand-still several times, and at least four 
battles were declared drawn. When he died, three hun- 
dred women were burned at his funeral pyre in the sacred - 
ceremony called Suttee. He never was a friend of the 
British, and so dangerous were his descendants to the 
peace and sovereignty of England, that they were, root, 
stock and branch, transported to Great Britain, and 
transformed into hybrid Englishmen and women. 

The Fish The appointment of Fish Commis- 

Commissionership. sioner, which is in the gift of the 
President, is a most important posi- 
tion, and the American Society of Naturalists, which met 
recently at Ithaca, New York, but voiced the general 
sentiment when it demanded that the new Commissioner 
shall be a scientific man. It is announced that the Presi- 
dent intends appointing a politician who is in the fullest 
ignorance of this subject, and owing to this statement the 
protest was made. California should not be backward in 
raising her voice against an unfit appointment. There 
are few Californians who do not know something about 
the matter. We have several hatcheries on this coast, 
and the work that has hitherto been done has been good, 
and should a politician be appointed to this office, we can 
hardly bring ourselves to believe that the good work will 
continue. Besides, the placing of this commission in the 
hands of an unfit man would be a direct violation of the 
law; for the statute of 1888 declared that the Commis- 
sioner "shall be a person of scientific and practical 
acquaintance with the fish and the fisheries of the United 
States." The present commission was established in 1*71, 
and Professor Spencer F. Baird was appointed, and so 
fearful was he that the office might fall a prey to the poli- 
tician, that he stipulated that no salary should be attached 
to it. This, however, was not done. But Senator Frye 
secured the insertion of the provision making only a man 
eligible to the office who had a practical and intimate 
knowledge of pisciculture. It is to be hoped that the 
President will not disregard the law in appointing as Com- 
missioner a man unlit for the position. 

A Case As was very generally expected, Clara Fal- 
ln Point, mer, the Alameda girl, who deliberately and 
with clear premeditation shot down a boy 
lover with whom she had quarreled, was acquitted after 
half an hour's deliberation by a presumedly intelligent and 
unbiased jury. Her lawyers, with the custom usual to 
skilled criminal attorneys, urged that the young wo 
be turned loose vindicated or declared guilty 1 f murder in 
the first degree. They wanted no half-way business — hang 
her or free her. Manslaughter was either too severe or 
not severe enough. The tenderhearted jury, whose qual- 
ity of mercy was unmixed with justice, gave the girl her 
freedom after thirty minutes' deliberation. On the first 



ballot of these intelligent and unbiased citizens of Oakland 
eleven justified the killing of the prisoner's victim; on the 
second ballot the twelfth man, realizing his painful mistake, 
corrected his error f and another triumph of justice was 
placed on the criminal calendar of the State. 

There was nothing in the evidence in that case which 
went to prove that the youth had crept into the home of 
this girl and destroyed her virtue. Rather it was showD 
that her habits were bad, and that the usual checks and re- 
straints necessary to right bringing up had been ignored 
and were absent in her case. It was shown that the boy, 
who died by her ready pistol, was not the only one with 
whom she had maintained criminal relations. The youth 
was quite as pure as the maiden when he met her, and 
relatively but little older. He was an industrious boy, ard 
contributed steadily to the support of his widowed mother. 
He was not unlike thousands of young fellows of whom re- 
spectable husbands and good citizens are made. The girl 
was not unlike hundreds of girls who ultimately fill our 
reform schools, and become the painted women of the 
street. 

The killing was premeditated; otherwise the means of 
death would not have been carefully hidden on the person 
of the murderer. So far as known it was not her custom 
to carry concealed weapons. All these facts were brought 
before the jury, and yet two ballots and thirty minutes 
only were required to declare that the girl was justified in 
her act. By what process of reasoning this verdict was 
reached is literally incomprehensible. How men sworn to 
do justice can endorse deliberate, wilful murder, as was 
done in this case, is a question that must remain unans- 
wered when brought before the bar of common sense. 
The Oakland verdict, however, does explain the low value 
that is set on human life in this State; the contempt for 
law, and the unchecked riot of crime in California. It is 
a stain on our criminal system that seems to fatten by 
what it feeds on, and deepens with the lapse of time. It 
is just this sort of shameful miscarriage that fills jails and 
penitentiaries with murderers, and indirectly encourages 
the use of the pistol in the settlement of fancied or real 
injuries. 



THE Chronicle has issued an almanac and "political and 
commercial statistician" which, while it contains a 
great many facts pertaining to the whole country, appeals 
with especial pertinence to the interests and industries of the 
Pacific Coast. As the preface very truly says: "A great 
variety of statistics relating to this section of the country 
are here presented for the first time under a single cover." 
The whole Almanac is filled with just such facts and fig- 
ures as the average politician, public man, merchant and 
general reader often appeals to. The bo k is conven- 
iently and systematically arranged, and is worth many 
times the price — 25 cents. 



Evans' Ale 
is always 
the same 

Because tl Is bottled 
by its makers. 

Brilliant and 
clear 
to the last 
drop. 

Not a particle of sediment. 

SHERWOOD & SHERWOOD 

Pacific Coast Agents 
San Francisco, Portland, Los Angeles 



WANTED:— Several irustwor'lr peMlenoen or ladies to travel in Call- 
vv toitiia for .siabifsiitd relino ;mu e>ienscs. 

steady puMti .n t- Bclose reference mu ser*addres&ea stamped envelope. 
The LooiUioa Company , Depi- 7, Chicago, ill. 




January 8, 189?. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



LEAVES FROM A NOTEBOOK. 



STATUARY Hall of our Park Museum has been en- 
riched by three Inures: those of King Saul, Delilah, and 
e. King Saul is an imposing figure, because of its 
size and knightly dignity, but, to use an artist's phrase, 
it docs not hold together. 

We may be a degenerate race, but it seems doubtful 
whether so powerful a physique is ever found in one so old. 

"And King Saul, what big eyes you have"! Another 
phvsieal error, it seems to me, for the eyes of the old are 
always small and sunken— small because sunken. 

The alert appearance given to the face by the eyes and 
by no other feature, and not by the pose of the body, is 
inconsistent, and quarrels with the complete and majestic 
repose of the rest of the statue. 

Delilah is dignity itself, and an ideal conception of the 
maiden of the story and of the times. There is one glar- 
ing defect in the use of the modern razor with which Sam- 
son's locks were shorn. 

If an anachronism had to be indu'ged in, some instrument 
artistically more pleasing should have been represented. 

La*t. tut not least, Merope, the Magnificent, with the 
graceful, strong sweep of the entire body (so strougly 
suggesting that old truth, "Curved is the line of beauty,") 
the action of every part of it, the face that tells the story, 
the figure that is ideal but ideally possible. Walk very 
sl.iwly around it, and see if you, too, are not tempted to 
touch with reverent lips the soft, life-like, almost tinted 
flesh of the feet, because of the adoration of the art that 
can make alive insensate stone. 
* * * 

One looks in vain for evidences of winter in San Fran- 
cisco, even in December, for one finds the late poppies on 
the foothills and the early buttercups a bit into the coun- 
try, plenty of b'ooms In the out-door gardens yet, and 
violets and the more delicate hyacinths indoors. We all 
admit ar.d enjoy the beauty of form and color'ng and the 
grace of trees in summer; but to me there is a more deli- 
cate beauty in the bare branches of winter, outlined 
against the gray sky. They make a net of lace as fine as 
tracery, sharp yet soft, bleak yet beautiful. The willow 
tree especially, with its long, drooping, tapering twigs, 
descending like a shower of rain; then the young, tender, 
green veiling the skeleton just enough to soften the out- 
lines, the pale gray-green, vivid yet soft, strength under 
the delicacy, spring's balm and beauty soothing the won- 
derful wounds of winter. 

* * * 

Some one, Goethe, I believe, says, "You should see a 
beautiful picture, read a beautiful poem, or hear some fine 
music every day." 

This may not be possible for those who are poor in this 
world's goods, but none are so rich as those who "go forth 
under the open sky and list to Nature's teachings." It 
costs nothing to see the innumerable shades, both strong 
and delicate, in sunrise and sunset, in the waters of the bay 
and the ocean, in the flowers that bloom and breathe for 
everyone, in a graceful spire that outlines itself, like an 
etching, at dusk, in the hills that rise to mountain-heights 
at twilight, in the land-lights that dazzle in the darkness, 
in a harmony of color anywhere, in the music of the street- 
singers, the brown birds, the grace of swaying trees or 
grain fields, the silver stars set singly or in battalions, the 
bright silver crescent in pale blue, or moon and stars in 
deepest purple, at the day's death at midnight. 
* * * > 

In Conservatory Valley, in Golden Gate Park, there 
is a dial; the hours and the motto are laid out in green 
garden beddiig, which reads, "I mark no hours that are 
not sunny." It seems to say to the passer-by, "Do thou 
likewise. Revel in and remember the sunshine, and forget 
the shadow, or remember it only to draw from it light to 
help ourselves and others onward and upward. Helping 
ourselves is, orshould be. helping others; helping others is 
helping ourselves." 

Carmany, at 25 Kearny street, has the latest and finest gentle- 
men's furuishinggoods, neckwear, shirts, scarfs and underwear. 



"Cook o' the North ! ' 
first-class dealers. 



Watson's Scotch Whiskey. Sold by all 




"Wr*T |T*T leather 
^ A^'i Dressing: 



i 



Is prepared In the largest leather factory In 
the world by the makers of Vlcl Kid— the 
most noted leather lu the world. It Rives n 
shoe a bright and lasting lustre, makes it soft 
and pliable, keeps it from cracking In wet 
and dry weather. The constant use cf Vici 
Dressing means a sarins In Bhoe leather 
which the student of economy enn't over- 
look. Ask the dealer for It. An illustrated 
book, telling how to care for shoes and In- 
crease their wear, mailed free. 
^ ROBERT II. FOERDERER, Philadelphia, 



luu in- 5 

INN 



5RUSHES 



For barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses, bil- 
liard tables, brewers, book-binders, candy-makers, 
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BUCHANAN BROS., 

BRUSH MANUFACTURERS, 609 Sacramento St. ,S. F Tel. 5610. 



UNITED STATES 
LAUNDRY. 



Telephone South 420. 



Office, 1004 Market Street . 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



DR. BYRON W. HAINES 



14 Grant Wenue 
Rooms 16-17-18-19 



Dentist 



Dr. FRANK G. PAGUE, 
Dentist 

Has removed his office to the Spring Valley Water Works Building, Geary 
and Stockton streets, southeast corner, S. F. Rooms 3, 5, and 7. 



fl. P. flornberg, 



23 KEARNY ST., S. F. 

Rooms 4 and 5. 



Telephone Red 365. 



FINE TAILORING. 



d. D. SULLIUAN 

Attorney-at- Law 
Rooms 34-38, 3d Floor Chronicle Building, San Francisco. 

DR. cl. NICHOLS, 

(Formerly County Physician of Amador County.) 

Office: *1 Powell street, cornet Powell and Ellis. Residence, 

Baldwin Hotel, S. P. Hours : 1 to 4 p. m. ; 7 to 8 p. m. 

VA/A.NTED:— Several trustworthy gentlemen or ladles to travel in Cali- 
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Steady position. Enclose rpference and self-addressed stamped envelope. 
The Dominion Company, Uept. 7, Chicago, 111. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 8, 1898. 




We obey no wand but pleasure's."— Tom Moore. 



CERTAINLY the Symphony Concerts 
give more complete pleasure to an 
appreciator of the arts than any public 
entertainments we are having in the town, 
or, indeed, are likely to have at present. 
The last programme of the Symphony con- 
certs was as interesting as the two preceding ones. 
To borrow the poetic symbolism of the Beethoven critic of 
the Examiner. I might say that the repast began with 
the "Egmont" overture, a healthy and substantial soup. 
Schumann's D minor symphony was of course the roast, 
delicious and full-flavored, and only underdone in spots. 
n, lilies' "Sylvia " suite^was a light puff pastry; the ex- 
perienced diner thinks- slightly of puff pastry, but the chil- 
dren love it and clamored for a second help, and got it. I 
am at a loss how to symbolize the Lohengrin " Vorspiel "; 
if the roast had not come on so soon I would omit the fish 
and call it an entrie, because that is indefinite, but, as it 
suggests neither ice cream nor fruit, I shall shirk my dif- 
ficulty, and complete this Bnswoithian simile by calling 
the William Till overture the coffee, — there was certainly 
c ignac in the coffee. 

Next week Tschaikowsky's "Patbetique" symphony 
will be the roast;— but I hate this frivolous tone in matters 
so serious, and canuot apply it to the essences of a mad 
and moody modern mind like Tschaikowsky's. There is no 
temperament more fascinatingly characteristic of this 
dark are than that of the unhappy musician, part Rus- 
sian part French, who died four years ago with scandals 
threatening bis oame,— a suicide the world respects but 
doesn't know, and probably never will. The excitable and 
morbid temperament of which he was the victim, is not so 
peculiarly Russian as universally modern: its prevalence is 
■ me of the most interesting and remarkable characteristics 
end of the nineteenth century. It is what the normal 
domestic person calls unhealthy, but to condemn it is not to 
get rid of it; it remains to be accounted for as a sign of 
the times. How widespread is the restlessness, the pes- 
simism, the agnosticism, the immense capacity for mental 
suffering, of which Tschaikowsky is an arch-type, is proved 
again by his present popularity. In him the typically An 
de slide souls tind their own appeal; their incessant trou- 
ble about problems for which there are no solutions, their 
strange humors aud stranger griefs, they have so much of 
the temperament of artistic genius,— without the genius; 
their religion and morality are worn out, but their philoso- 
phy is not ready to put on. There is something of vulgar- 
is- in the modern passion for the crimson and purple and 
Iramatic in art; it may be a craze, but it is absurd 
to call it a pose when it is rooted so deep inhuman nature. 
The artist presents the life of bis time, but he does not 
undertake to interpret it. Tschaikowsky did not find a 
way out of the gloom; he found the only relief that such a 
nature finds, in artistic expression. His unhappiness was 
not in his environment; it was in himself, and so there 
was no hope of escape from it. What could be more tragic 
a-id more ridiculous than the story of his marriage ? After 
six weeks of married life his wife irritated him so much 
that he fled from her and never returned. It may be that 
the soul of Tschaikowsky was diseased, but his was no iso- 
lated case; he shared the epidemic of the times. 

Hi- sixth and last symphony, which Mr. Scheel will 
play next Thursday, was lirst "performed, under his own 
direction, at a .-..inert of the Russian Musical Society on 
October lftth, 1893, The Leipsic Signale said: 

"Although ihe composer was recalled many times at the finish, 
be was not satisfied with theefl sot which his new work had produced, 
aid he expressed a hope that it might soon be performed again, to 
enable its being better understood to this end he also give it. 
"/'"•"- . Hi? title of " Symphonle Patheliqne," little 

thinking how soon his wish would be gratified, and Ihe new title be- 
come indeed strangely appropriate. A few days afterwards the 
Master was dead." 



The Henrittta is interesting as an experiment to test the 
mental development of theatre-gcers. Many are laughing 
at it as heartily as ever they did, — a sad omen of stagna- 
tion — but there are others who find that it does not affect 
them as it used to do. It is not that Tin- Henrietta and 
Bertie the Lamb are changed, it is they themselves who 
are not what they or.ee were, and in consequence the per- 
formances at the Baldwin make them feel old or superior, 
according to the humor of the moment. I confess without 
shame that I never saw The Henrietta before, and that it 
does not make me feel how old I am but how young the 
rest are. A taste for the problem play and the play of 
rural realism or paradoxical dialogue spoils one for these 
serio-comics. It would be so hard to go back to a feeding 
bottle after you had used a spoon and fork. The psycho- 
logical interest of persons with only one characteristic 
apiece is so soon exhausted. Bertie the Lamb is like the 
man with one anecdote, and Mr. Stuart Robsou tells it 
very well and manages the uncontrollable voice with re- 
markable control. 

Mrs. Robson as the widow is the chief joy of the cast. 
Her neat farce comedy acting is funny and just enough. 
Her scenes with the two old men endure the best. How 
exasperating these ingenues are — Miss Edna Brothers not 
more so than is absolutely necessary to fill the role of 
Agnes. But who would stand such girls about the house? 
One calm, brotherly remark would down them, one icy 
glance, up and down, would cure all their overgrown silli- 
ness. And where, oh where, did Mr. Harrison Armstrong 
study English types of imbecility 'i 1 His is the worst ever 
perpetrated— even on the American stage; it is more im- 
possible than an English actress's conception of an Ameri- 
can girl and accent. I hope he will be able to stick to his 
rustic swains, which he does so well. The Lady Trelaw- 
ney of Miss Gertrude Perry is needlessly distressing; to be 
amusing it is not necessary to get as far away as possible 
from rationality. 

* # * 

As usual, a good show at the Orpheum. The Farnum 
Brothers, acrobats, and Harry and Charles Avalo, triple 
bar performers, are as good as any of their kind. But 
the "dainty playlet" of Patrice is a sad performance, — 
sad because it ought to have been so exquisite. There is 
poetry and romance in the conception of the grandmother 
coming to life for an hour on New Year's eve, and step- 
ping down from her picture frame to meet her grandson, 
who reminds her of her old love. Surely a scene of refine- 
ment and grace, — her old-world quaintness contrasted 
with his modern "jag,"— would be as interesting, .and 
their mutual bewilderment as amusing, as these terpsi 
chorean revels and Sausalito flirtations. His "jag" 
isn't vulgar there,- -it's dramatic, and the chance of a 
charming scene is lost. We might so easily have art in 
the music halls. 

* * * 

At Gnu Coney Island, the brightest of its kind, has been 
drawing immense audiences to the Columbia again this 
week. On Monday next " Jolly Nellie McHenry " begins 
an engagement of one week with a new piece called .1 
Night In Xnr York. After that comes Rich and Harris's 
Courted Into Court, with Marie Dressier and John C. Rice. 

* * * 

On Monday evening du Souchet's farce, The Man From 
Mexico, will be performed at the Baldwin. Mr. William 
Collier, Mr. Maclyn Arbuckle, and Miss Louise Allen are 
in the cast. 

Mother Goos, enters its second edition at the Tivoli on 
Monday next. There will te new songs, dances and spec- 
ialties by the grown-up people and a gavotte by the kids. 
Brian Boru, Stanislaus Stange's romantic Irish opera, will 
be the next production. 

Besides Tschaikowsky's sixth symphony, Mr. Scheel will 
play Grieg's "Im Herst" overture, Schumann's "Aben- 
lied," and Rubinstein's "Bal Costume'' at the symphony 
concert on Thursday next. 

The successful three weeks' run of The Girl I Lrft Be- 
hind Me at the Alcazar closes to-morrow, and on Monday 
next the stock company, under the management of Mr. 
Frederick Paulding, will be seen in Esmeralda, a play by 
Frances Hodson Burnett and William Gillette 



January 8, 1898. 



SAN IRAN . ISCO NKWS II ll'l-.K 



There are several new turns announced for next week 
at the Orpheum, and among the holtl-ovors the Farnum 
its, the Elinore Sister?. Patrice. Rmtiello. and the 
ballet. 

Tuesday evening, January 11th, Miss Frai 
a soprano singer, will give a concert at the Sherman-Clay 
Hall. Miss Davis is a Califomian, and baa studied with 

rCampanini, Madame Lablacl.c Delle Sedie. T 
lit i. and other peop'e in Europe ai.d America. Mis Car- 
mchael-Carr, the Misses Heine, and Miss Hulda Andersen 
play at the concert. 
The Foot Cycling Riuk is a novelty in San Francisco 
thil will open this evening at old Union Hall on Howard 
street. The Daniels new cycling skates will be used. 
Music, an optical illusion, projectoscopeof moving pictures 
are among the attractions. A new floor has been laid and 
the hall renovated. 

Mis? Villa Whitney White gives another lecture and song 
recital at the California this afternoon. 



A GREAT FINANCIAL INSTITUTION. 

THE rapid accumulation of vast fortunes by private in- 
dividuals and corporations in the United States has 
often been the subject of universal wonder; and perhaps 
there can be seen nowhere a more striking illustration of 
the amassing and control of large sums than is to be found 
in the great banking institutions of the country. Take as 
an example the statement of the Hibernia Bank published 
at the close of business for the year 1897. This great 
financial concern, the custodian of the funds of thousands 
of depositors, at the end of the year held total assets of 
the value of $11,467,642.66. The people of thecouutry are 
familiar with large figures, but there are few indeed who 
appreciate the financial skill, conservative judgment and 
executive ability necessary to the safe management of 
such an institution. It must be remembered that the 
Hibernia Savings and Loan Society, holding these vast 
sums, must be prepared to meet all demands at a moment's 
notice; must be always safe, and yet invest the funds 
entrusted to its keeping so that they will earn a reason- 
able return. Bad judgment, misca.culation, unwise fore- 
cast of the condition of the country and probable fluctua- 
tions and market values of securities— all these elements 
are to be taken into account by the banker, and must be 
so nicely judged that the funds placed in his keeping may 
be at any time produced either in actual dollars or their 
unquestioned and instantly-accepted equivalent. When 
one considers all the complex interests and influences that 
must be thus carefully measured, the great responsibility 
and the wide intimacy with practical financial problems 
becomes apparent. The Hibernia Savings and Loan So- 
ciety is one of the most solid banking institutions in the 
United States, and is thus regarded everywhere. It has 
been made so by the constant exercise of those qualities 
of good judgment and the display of the highest order of 
business sagacity. The whole history of this institution is 
a compliment to the men whose active brains, broad fore- 
sight and sound mental poise have grounded it in the pub- 
lic confidence and general esteem. 



BIRTH OF THE ROSE. 



PERFECT thought went hoveling in [he air 
k Seeking expression visible and found 

A chaste young shoot of green from virgin ground 
All buddtid: and he gladly entered there. 

He filled her soul with beauty ; and at morn 

Drew warmth of love from the bright sun- God'a ray, 
The dew from night, the secrets from the clay — 

She sighed — the petals burst— a Rose was born I 

Rose Maynard David. 



J. F. Cutter and Argonaut Whiskies have added very materially 
to the commendable hilarity of this holiday season. Everybody 
who has drank tbis best of all liquors have been made to feel more 
fully 1 he generous impulses and good-will-toward-men that Christ- 
mas always brings. Made of the best material, mellow with age 
pure and wholesome, these fine whiskies are eudorsed by all who 
know a good thing when they see it, and always have the best, 

Ths Press Clipping Bureau. 510 Montgomer 7 street. S. F. reads all 
papers on the Paolflo Coast, and supplies ollppirgs on all toplos.b ist&esg 
and personal. 



H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANT b 

Fire and Marine Insurance Agents, 

309 and 311 Sansome St. • • - • San Francisco. Cfl 

CORRESPONDENTS : 

FINDLAY, DURHAM & URODIE 48 and «Throadnecdlo SI. London 

SIMPSON, MACK1RDY & CO 2» South Castle St.. Liverpool 



Kers. 
The 



R \J ,' T"L X Prledlander.Goltlob JtCo., 

DalQWln I neaxre- Lessees and Mano 

Beginning Mondav. January loth. "A World of Fun.' 
quaint comedian. Willie Collier, In the farckal Int. 

THE MAN FROM MEXICO. 

A great comedy company in support. 
Coming— "The Girl from Paris." 

ni . n~L _x Fred Belasco, Lessee. 

rAlCaZar I neatre. Mark Thau, Manager. PhoneMaln254. 

The Madison Square success, 

ESMERALDA. 

A domestic drama by Francis Hodson Burnett and William 

Gillette, 

Prices, reserved. 15c; 2ic, 35c. 50c. Matinee Saturday. 

In preparation, FORBIDDEN FRDIT. 

Tivoli Opera House. — Extra 

Thursday, January 13th, at 3:15 P. M. Fourlh symphony concert. 

SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY SOCIETY 

FRlTZ SGHEEL, musical director. 

Programme— l. Overture. Im Herbs i. Edward Grieir; 2. Abend- 
lied, Rob. Schumann; 3. Bal Costume, A. Rubinstein; 4. Sym- 
phonie. No. 6. Pathetique, P. Tschaikowsky. 
Prices including reserved seats, $1.50, $1, and 75c. Seats on 
sale at Tivoli, commencing Monday morning, January 10th. 

T' . I • /~\ j_j Mrs Ernestine Kreling. 

I VOl I V-ZDera /HO USe. Proprietor and Manager 

Every evening. Second edition of our holiday spectacle, 

MOTHER GOOSE. 

3 grand ballets; great cast; superb specialties; gorgeous seen 
ery: beautiful costumes. A treat for young and old; bring the 
children. 

Next opera, BRIAN BORTJ. Seats on sale one week in advance. 
Popular Prices 25cana5Jo 

Oi San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall O'Farrell 

rpneUIT.. street, between Stockton and Powell streets, 

Week commencing Monday. January 10, 1898. 

BARNEY X> RUSSELL, 

Novelty character sketch artiste; Paulo & Dlka. eccentrio vo- 
calists; Patrice, supported by Alf Hampton and J F, Whit- 
beck; Kittle Mitchell, the winsome soubrette; Musical Dale, 
campanologist; Mile. Rombello sand palntress ; Farnum Bros , 
great American acrobats; Elioore Sisters, character comedi- 
ennes; positively last week of the ballet i-pectacle. 
Reserved seats, 25c ; balcony. 10c; opera chairs and box seats, 
50c; Matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday. Matinee 
Prices: Parquet, any seat, Sio. ; balcony, any seat, 10c; chil- 
dren, 10c, any part. 



233 Sutter Street, 
Cor. Grant Ave. 



Sherman, Glay X Go. lie 

Tuesday evening, January 11, 1898. Debut of 

MISS FRANCES DAVIS, Soprano, 

Pupil of Signor Campanint and Madame Lablache. 
Executants; Mrs. Carmichael-Carr, Miss L. Florence Heine, 
Miss Made L. Heine, Miss Hulda Andersen. 
Reserved seats. 75 cents. On sale at Sherman. Clay & Co.'s 
Music House, Monday and Tuesday. January 10th and 11th. 



Howard Street, bet. Third and : 
San Francisco. 



Old Union hall, 

Saturday evening, January 8, 1898. Grand opening of the 

FOOT CYCLING RINK. 

Optical illusion representing all nations. 
Positively first appearance in San Francisco. 

WANTED:— Several trustworthy gentlemen or ladies to travel in Cali- 
fornia for established, reliaole house, salary $780 and expenses. 
Steady position. Enclose reference and self addressed stamped envelope. 
The Dominion Company, Dept. ?, Chicago, 111. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTkR. 



January 8, 1898. 




IT is written somewhere, "Verily tbe lion 
and the lamb shall lie down together" 
and call each other pet and endearing names, and so it 
has come to pass, for the Sun that erstwhile could find no 
1 rong enough in which to excoriate yellow jour- 
; by the World and Journal, has made 
.M r. Hearst, and the Sun and the 
Journal now flock together and turn their combined bat- 
teries upon Mr. Pulitzer. The Journal's grand celebration 
of the inauguration of Greater New York all by itself, and 
to accomplish this journalistic result has expended 
gold pieces. It is this "enterprise" which the Sun now 
admires, and declares that the young Californian is all that 
□Arable as a journalist. The Journal returns the 
compliment and declares that the Sun (next to the Jour- 
nal) is a great paper. The wonder goes around among 
newspaper men how the late Mr. Dana feels in his coffin. 

* * * 

One of the big department stores that infest New York 
just now managed to get ahead of its competitors last 
I ter of a novelty for the holidays. Almost 
anytli rows or is made to order can be pun 

se stores, from a cambric needle to an elephant; but 

one in store in question paralyzed bargain seek- 

Douncements "Cats!" and then in black 

1 the importation from away down p 

150 cats of both sexes, of all colors, qualities. 

and disposition! Black cats ! White cats ' Maltesi 

Angora cats ! Thomas cats I Any kind of cat while you 

wait ! " There was a big rush for cats, and the housi 

el importation before dark the same day. Talk of 
Yankee enterprise ! 

* * * 

I am so sorry that the San Francisco public may not 

the Weber & Fields' burlesque Pout* 

—now the thing at their Broadway theatre. You would 

very clever take-off on The First Born. 

oians have laughed themselves reallv hoarse at the 

kid who is the subject of the story as burlesqued. 

follows the rescue of Cisneros by theJournal people, which 

boo laughable, and so realistic. a la Decker 
dered 1 Kelly. '/'/,, Little Minister, with its "B 

'<<es in. but of course that would not be under- 
by San Francisco theatre-goers, as Maud Adams is 
managi d by our " Jay " manager. 

* * * 

The theatres generally have been doing a big business 
days. Usually theexperienceTof managers has 
e are too busy with holiday labors to find 
ment in the evenings. This year seen 

rule. .May Irwin is mai 
anages herself. She finds that this 
■ fore has been an expensive lux mi 1 fcm 

New York- and draws well. De I 

'"' The High 

Hood standards, is the best of its 
kind seen on Broadway for many seasons. Maud A 

potent attractions. R 
'dly up to the average of bis product 

or shapely figures of the femio- 
it hard to secure an abundant 
supply for his new leg drama. 

* * # 
rs of a rather sensational dinner, given by 
Howard, at the II 
I ave leaked out tor the benefit of 

tin ii,anv who would willingly have gone had they 
libly eight ladies and gentlemen we 

Of one of Gould's young marn. 
"; 1 "' had J 1 nip abroad; but Kail 

upon a time an actress noted for the 
splendor of her costumes and the fact 
a proi Cody (Buffalo Bill)— was 

the 11. g. She received the guesl 

sat at the foot of the table, while Howard was at the head, 



Among the guests were Mr. and Mrs. Valentine P. Snyder 
and Mr. and Mrs. Kirkpatrick. These ladies were well- 
known in Sacrament o and San Francisco as the Torbert 
sisters, both remarkable beauties. The menu was all that 
could procure, the chef being given carte blanche. 
After the banquet there was music, recitations by Miss 
a grand finale, the distribution of pres- 
ents from the Christmas tree by Santa Claus. Too bad 
that the J> ill prevents Howard and Katharine 

from being supremely happy. 

# * * 

All of New York society was once divided into four hun- 
dred parts, under the discreet management of the late 
Ward McAllister, whose ideas upon the subject were ac- 
quired in the early days of San Francisco, when he directed 
the movements of the Stockton-street aristocracy. Where- 
New York's crtnu rfi la dime were 
known as The Four Hundred. Their cohesive power was 
lost with the demise of their lamented leader, and now 
is a split, and The New Seventy-live have set up in 
business as the exclusives of New York society, leaving 
the Three Hundred and Twenty-Five to shift for them- 
selves. Among The Seventy-Five are enrolled Mr. and 
Mrs Hermann Oelrichs, Miss Virginia Fair, and Mr. and 
Mrs George Crocker, so that Cahfornians will have some 
friends at court. 

# * # 

The reports current from time to time concerning the 
marital troubles of fount Castellane and his much en- 
dowered bride, are doubtless concocted b}' the reporters 
of yellow journalism pour patter le tempt. The best e\idence 
lement in this couple is the very recent 
birth The Goulds are very domestic. 

je is tbe father of five distinct individualities, and 
Edwin is also pater families twice repeated. The other 
members of the family are still unmarried. 

# * * 

It was only a question of time when December and June 

[ether in holy wedlock. Mr. Haggin ac- 

i and-seventy years— strong and 

able-bodied — and the bride, Miss Voorbies, is only eight- 

and-twenly. It was a marriage of love, without doubt, 

for Mr. Haggin has been a father to her these many years. 

I'./;/.-. January :: , 1898. Enthk Nous. 

A Panorama 440 Miles Long. 

From the Observation Car oa the New Virk Central a living pan- 

orami MO miles long any be seen. This includes the Uenesse, 

Back B rer and Mohawk Valleys and It! miles of the Hudson 

including the foothills of the Adirondack Mountains; the 

at Albany; tli- Catsklll Mountains; tbe Palisades of tbe 

1 and 1 Ik- New York Central's magnificent approach to the 

niwropnlia— this being the only trunk line whose trains enter the 

city of New \ ork 

Fvidently Jnpam oda are prime favorites with Ihepeop'e 

ofSia Francisco for the store of George Mar.-b ,y Co., at 625 
Market der the Palace hotel, has been overrun wiih 

b ryera for thi Carios, art goods, tapestries, ivory 

c ixvtnga and a whole Tokyo bazar in minature baa invited and in • 
in at Marsh's store is a liberal education 
in the arts ol pei iple. 



Snake Into Your Shoes 



Allen's Fool Ease, a Powder for the 

rlten, smarting feet, and Instantly takes the 

sting out ol corns and bunions. [I 3 the greatest comfori dlaoovery of the 

11 ' a ikes tight Oiling or new shoe* feel easy. It Is 

.11 us. and hot, tired, ;iching feet. Try it 

Sold by all druggists and shoe stores. Bv mall for use. In stamps. 

Trial package FREK. Address. Allen S. Olmsted, Le Roy, N. Y. 

DR. dAS. G. GILBERTSON. Dentist. 

819 Market Street, third floor, room E, San Francisco 
Hour s : 9 u 5, Academy of Sciences BulidiDg. 

Till: OPIUM AND MORPHINE HABIT. 

... i of a reli ble cure. Free. 
Dr. .1. L. Stephens, Dept. B„ Lebanon, Ohio. 

has no shading; It has connective 

L>IQilb*LIfl6 utlOrtfldflQ is simple, legible and fast as the 

fastest. Full personal course, 825; 
by maM I,. S; flrst-class references; descriptive ' Sketch ** free 
ROSCOE L, eames. Room 556 Parrott Building; telephone Jessie 1011 



January 8. 1898. 



SAN PRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



DODQER'S DISILLUSION. 



II V W. HI II. WESTERN. 



THE fetching photograph of Mademoiselle Valette that 
hangs in Dodger's studv. just above the mantel, is a 
souvenir of his last trip abr 

Tonight, viewing it through the smike curling up from 
his after-dinner cigar, he is suie the big, black eyes wink 
at him, just as they did that night in gay Paris, when,— 
but that is a tale that has never been told" 
A moment's hesitation and Dodger winks in return. 
Instantly there is a flutter of the fluffy skirts, and— 
Mademoiselle kicks, the tiny white satin slipper almost 
touching the white and gold picture frame above her 
head. 

Dodger's eyes bulge with amazement and he starts to 
rubbing them vigorously as the dainty piece of femininity 
leaps lightly from out its setting to the tiger-skin rug at 
his feet. 

But, the end is not yet, for now through the room float 
strains of exquisitelyharmonized melody, and Mademoiselle 
dances, — wildly, superbly. 

It is the same dance that set all Paris a-talking. There 
is, too, the same subtle magnetism of the dancer that called 
forth Dodger's timorous invitation to dine. 

How well he remembers the hurriedly scribbled note in 
return, and the phrase that ran: "It will be so pleasant 
to meet a real American again, for let me whisper it, I too 
am an American." Ah! Happiness; it is to dream. 

As the dance ends Dodger raises his hands in applause, 
then lets them fall in surprise as in place of the diminutive 
figure, Mademoiselle Valette stands before him in all her 
queenly beauty and full five feet tall. 

A moment more and with a merry laugh she is perched 
upon the arm of his chair smiling down upon him. 

The situation reminds Dodger that Mrs. Dodger is in the 
adjoining room and liable to burst in upon the scene at 
any moment. The thought is a terrifying one. 

"Mademoiselle," he exclaims, "you must not stay here; 
you must go — er — go back to your frame. Mrs. Dodger 
wouldn't understand you know, — er — and— er — . Yes, I 
did forget to tell you I was a married man." 
Mademoiselle laughs prettily at his confusion. 
" You dear old fellow!" 

The white arm that glides about Dodger's neck burns 
like a red-hot iron and he continues nervously: "This, 
you know, is hardly the — er — jproper thing for a married 
man to allow." 

Mademoiselle shrugs her gleaming white shoulders care- 
lessly, then laughs as she folds Dodger's arm tightly about 
her waist. 

"There! Open your eyes you sleepy fellow, and talk 
nice to me." Dodger is thoroughly bewildered. Are not 
his eyes already staring wildly open! 

He looks up stupidly, to meet the gaze of — Mrs. Dodger. 
The room whirls about him; the ceiling descends and 
Dodger seems to rise to meet it. 

" How did you get here?" he finally questions desper- 
ately. 
Surprise sits in Mrs. Dodgers eyes as she replies. 
" Why, I found you asleep. " Then pausing impressively 
she goes on, playfully. "You were actually making love 
to me, Dodger." 

" Suffering Saints! I — I didn't think it was you!" ex- 
claims the thoughtless Dodger. 

" You didn't think it was me? Is that what you say 
Mr. Dodger?" and she faces him hotly. "Then who did 
you think it was? That's what I want to know!" 

Dodger is in a tight place and he knows it. Nerving 
himself for the deception, he lies heroically. 

"I thought your mother was here, — your sainted 
mother." 

"Dear Dodger!" 

He takes her in his arms, but his conscience gives him 
an ugly twist and Dodger cannot meet the trusting eyes 
searching for his own. He turns his head. In doing so he 
looks straight up at the photograph in the white and gold 
frame that hangs above the mantel. Did Mademoiselle 
wink — the other eye? 




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and SUPPLIES 

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HUNTINGTON CENTRIFUGAL ROLLER MILL 
ENGINES BOILERS, STEAM PUMPS. 
WOOD-WORKING AND IRON-WORKING MACHINERY. 

PARKE, LACY & CO., 

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Partington's 97?a S az/ ne 

and 

SCHOOL OF . % ewspaper 
424 FINE STREET, S. F. 



Extra Classes on Saturdays 
and evenings 



jllujtration 



LUDLAM.^ 

928 Sutter St. 



ELOCUTION and 

DRAMATIC ART. 



The SOLLY WALTER Scnool of Illustration, 



In Pen and ink. 



26 O'Farrell Street. 



MORRIS & KENNEDY'S 

Art Gallery -^ 

fit Greatly Reduced Prices. 



19 and 21 POST ST., S. F. 

New and Elegant PAINTINGS, 
PICTURES and FRAMES. 



GRAY BROS,- 



316 Montgomery St., S. F. 

205 New High St., Los Angeles. 



C oncrete and . . . 
Artificial Stone Work. 



IS YOUR 

TITLE 

PERFECT? 



If you have any doubt, consult the 

California Title Insurance and Trust Co. 

Insurance policies guaranteeing titles to be 
perfect issued and abstracts made and con- 
tinued. Money to loan on real estate 
Office— Mills Building. 



Chas. Page, Pres,; Howard E. Wright, Secretary and Manager, 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 8, 1898. 




R. Charles Dunphy, 
who won two races 
in a week, has, it is whispered, serious designs of emulat- 
ing the example of the great Sloan and giving up his at- 
tention most seriously to race riding. The experts on turf 
matters all declare that Mr. Dunphy's style of riding is 
absurd, and that he should fashion his riding after the 
manner of the great polo players of Burlingame. But 
though Mr. Dunphy rolls all over his horse and looks as if 
he were thoroughly alarmed as to what the noble creature 
would do next, yet he wins, while perhaps his opponents 
are only thinking of how pretty they look, and prefer to 
remain longer in the race so that the girls may have a 
longer chance to stare at them. 

* # * 

That youthful couple who astonished their friends not a 
little by marrying in such haste without letting their 
parents know, have queer ideas concerning the dignity 
that awaits upon the event of a newlymade marriage. 
It is true that the father's house was not prepared 
for a bridal couple and their appetites, but it certainly 
was a remarkable performance to select for their 
breakfastiug place a restaurant on Market street which 
caters to a rather fast set. Lunch was partaken 
in equally as sporty a place, and dinner was eaten where 
the chef is French and where meals are said to be the 
most expensive in the city. The eveniug was rounded out 
by attendance at a variety show. The young lady when 
asked as to how she made up her mind to so suddenly ac- 
cept her husband, said: i; Well, I really don't know. I 
only knew him for six weeks — and the funny part of it all 
is, that Pedar was engaged to a lot of girls at the time — 
but I got him!" The bride's parents are delighted over 
the catch but as yet there seems to be a reluctancy on the 
part of the groom's parents in sending their congratula- 
tions. 

* * # 

If the poor girl but knew it there is an advantage in ber 
poverty which is not enjoyed by the girls of rich parents. 
The poor girl, provided she is agreeable to the eye, has 
very much more enjoyment in life than the one with means. 
She can go everywhere, accept all manner of attention, 
and be certain that the attention is meant solely for her- 
self and not for any gilded consideration. The rich girl 
whose parents have no taste for entertaining is sooner or 
later placed in an awkward position if she accepts everything 
that comes her way and gives no return — while the poor girl 
rau go to every tea, dance, or dinner or theatre party 
with the consciousness that nothing can be expected from 
her because she is poor. It can hardly be admired, this 
delicate humility of spirit, and the poor girl who continues 
the practise does not generally win a large share of public 
approval. The trouble with the poor girl is that she has 
to marry, and that speedily, for if her face once gets 
too familiar in that gay set which calls itself society, there 
is a very good chance that she can hang on there and act 
as godmother for several of her friend's children in a spirit 
which will truly savor of Christian humility. 

* * * 

An item of news comes from across the bay, and from 
the aristocratic hills of Sausalito. Itissaid thatin that flour- 
ishing borough, inhabited by Colonel O. C. Miller and Judge 
Campbell, that society is most select, that the young 
men there are most discriminating in their attentions, and 
that only the «< pjui ultra of a girl — that is Sausalitouese 
—can find favor in their eyes. It is on record that a most 
charming young lady from this side went over yon, and 
got the cold shoulder because she had not quite the high 
and haughty bearing that is so distinctive a feature of 
Sausalito societv. 

» * # 

Bright and sparkling as were many public places during 
the holidays in this city, in none of them were there 
greater beauty, more brilliant or brighter scenes and 
faces than at the Palace Grill Room, which was especially 



patronized during the season just closed. This splendid 
restaurant has no superior in the United States, and its 
service, admirable in all respects, and tempting cuisine, is 
always the subject of remark by every traveled man who 
visits it. It is safe to say that nowhere else in the world 
can the Palace Grill be duplicated for price, elegant ser- 
vice, and rich menu. 

* * # 

New York's "400" have been riven and the leaders of 
society in Gotham under the banner of Whitney and Astor 
are the centres of contending factions. Californians take 
a rather unusual interest in the situation because there is 
a large colony of San Francisco people living East who are 
prominent in the world of busiuess and society. It is noted 
that the Hermann Oelrichs and Miss Fair are among the 
select seventy-five of the Whitney- VaDderbilt people. The 
prominence and solid personal worth of the Pacific 
Coast representatives in this social set is a just recogni- 
tion of a quality that is not measured by wealth alone. 
Mrs. Oelrichs and her amiable sister, Miss Fair, have not 
forgotten the friends of earlier years. When they visit 
San Francisco their acquaintances here, whether fortune 
has smiled on them or not, are always sure of a warm wel 
come at the Nob Hill mansion. Those admirable qualities 
that separate the true woman from her less fortunate 
neighbor are finely developed in these ladies, and they are 
loved and respected for the rare merit of kindness and 
sincerity that are the jewels of feminine character, and 
it is a pleasure to their friends to feel that the most prom- 
inent people of New York recognize these facts as they 
are regarded in San Francisco. 



There is a certain individual who boasts of one club 
membership, who also poses as a great art connoisseur and 
who prides himself on being a raconteur. The trouble with 
this inordinately conceited creature is that he does not 
know the diff rence betwc n wit and grossness, and some 
of his stories are so appallingly vulgar that it would bring 
a blush to the cheeks of a coal heaver. Even when men 
leave the table in disgust over his stories, he imagines 
they forsake his company in order to escape being choked to 
death with laughter, instead of with wrathful indignation. 



Egyptian Henna. Safe, Sure, Pleasant. A vegetable hair dye for 
restoring gray hair to its original color. Immediate effect. Free from all 
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Mothers, besure and use ' 
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Mrs. V7:nslow's Soothing Syrup " for your 



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Fins Clarets and 
Sauteim 



Cases, Quarts, and Pints, 



CHARLES MEINECKE & CO. 

Sole Agents. 
814 Sacmmento St., San Francisco. 



DR. CHRISTENSEN, Dentist, 

Has removed to 2720 Mission street, between Twenty-third and 
Twenty fourth. Four specialists In attendance. 
Phone— Mission 160. 



January 8, 1898. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS T.KTTKR. 



11 



W- "RqSg 




'O FOR A BLOW ON THE BRINY, O '-««Gtr thouohts 
FOB a blow on the briny. 







For a splash o' Ibe silvery spray. 

For a whiff ami a sniff" on a slippery skiff" 

And a ru9h o'er the watery way. 

for a blow on the briny, 1 1 

For a breath 0' the hillowy blue. 
An open sea and a ship for me, 

And a hurricane. What say you? 
O for a blow on the briny, 

For a blast o* the salt sea breeze, 
With a fearless soul in the wrath and roll, 

Which we find on the raging seas. 
O for a blow on the briny, 

For a skip o'er the feathery foam, 
With a heart as free as the soul of the sea, 

And a share in the Kingdom come. 

With a hip, hurrah ! I'm aboard and away, 
On a beautiful day sunshiny ; 

For a whiff ami a sniff on a slippery skiff, 
And a dash and a splabb on the briny, O. 



THE LEAF.— from the French of arnault. 

A withered leaf came sailing past 
Across the wintry sky; 

■ Now whither art thou bound, so fast, 

Poor wandering waif?" quoth I. 
' Alas, the storm the oak has riven, 
That once was my support, 
Now, o'er the earLh I'm swiftly driven, 
Of every wind the sport. 

■ Yet, though o'er plain and distant valley, 

The gale or gentle breeze 
In many a changeful mood do toss me, 

By forest or by seas, 
With fickle fate I have no quarrel, 

And naught of fear I know ; 
I only go where the leaf of the laurel 

And the leaf of the rose must go." 



THE COMING OF LOVE—helen hay, in harper's magazine- 

I dreamed that love came as the oak-trees grow, 
By the chance dropping of a tiny seed, 
And then from moon to moon with steady speed, 

Tho' torn by winds and chilled with heedless snow, 

The sap of pulsing life would upward flow 

Till in its might the heavens themselves could read 
Portents of power that they must learn to heed. 

This was my dream : the waking proved not so. 

For loy6 came like a flower and grew apace. 
I saw it blossom, tenderly and frail 

Till the dear spring had run its eager race. 

Then the rough wind tossed high the petals red, 
The seed fell far in soil beyond my pale. 

I know not now, if love be lost or dead. 



A FRAGMENT.— longfellow. 

And Nature, the old nurse, 

Took the child upon her knee, 
Saying, here is a story-book 

Thy Father has written for thee. 
Come wander with me, she said, 

Into regions yet untrod, 
And read what is still unread, 

In the manuscript of God— 
And he wandered away and away 

With Nature, the dear old nurse, 
Who sang to him night and day 

The rhymes of the universe. 

A ROSE TO THE LIVING.— /wo* waterman. 

A rose to the living is more 

Than sumptuous wreaths to the dead ; 
In filling love's infinite store, 
A rose to the living is more— 
If graciously given before 

The hungering spirit is fled,— 
A rose to the living is more 

Than sumptuous wreaths to the dead. 



IMMMfl 



"• WHITE i KING. 



The Lightest 
Running. 

The Easiest 
Sewing. 

The 

Handsomest 
and the 
Most Durable 




I SEWING MACHINE 



IN THE WORLD 

It sews all sewable articles and satisfies everybody'. 



We manufacture 
the 



A strictly High- 
Grade; Wheel. £7 



WHITE BIGY6LE 

WHITE SEWING MACHINE CO, 

Y. M. C. A. BUILDING, San Francisco. 



BrooldyQ 
jlotel ® e 



Conducted on both the 

EUROPEAN AND 
AMERICAN PLAN. 
Btjsh Street, bet. Sansome and Montgomery, S. F 
This favorite hotel is under the management of 
Charles Montgomery, and is as good, if not the best, Familv and Busi- 
ness Men's Hotel in San Francisco. Home comforts, cuisine unexcelled, 
first-class service and the highest standard of respectability guaranteed, 
Our rooms cannot be surpassed for neatness and comfort. 

Board and room— Per day, $1.25, $t.50, $1.75, and J2; per week, $7 to 812; 
per month, $27.50 to $40; single room, 50c. to $1. 

4S"Free coach to and from the hotel. 



Hotel Bella Vista 



1001 Pine street 



A First-class Hotel 



The Bella Vista is the Pioneer 
First-class Family Hotel of 
San Francisco. All the com- 
forts of a modern residence. 

MRS. A. F. TRACY 



New York. 



Madison Square, Broadwatj and 23d 
Street. 



Under new management. Rooms single or 
en suite. Restaurant unsurpassed. Ele- 
gant In all appointments at moderate 
prices. 

Reed & Roblee, Props. 
EUROPEAN PLAN. 



HOTEL 
BflRTHOLDI 

New York 



Occidental Hotel. 



A quiet home, centrally located, for 
those who appreciate comfort and 
attention. 



Wm B. Hooper, Manager. 



San Francisco 



Riggs House, 

THE HOTEL 



WASHINGTON, D, C. 



PAR EXCELLENCE" 

First class in all 



of the National Capital. 

appointments. 

An illustrated guide to Washington will be 

mailed free of charge, upon receipt of two 

2-oent stamps. 

O. 0. STAPLES, Prop. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 8, 1898. 




U/fL 




The "Ten Million Tons of Ore" mys- 
The Great Northern tery of the subsidized portion of the 
industrial Gold press in the British metropolis is 
Company, Limited, solved at last, to the discredit of 
California, as usual, and the site of 
operations of the Great Northern Industrial Gold Com- 
pany, Limited, is located. The worst of this tissue of ex- 
aggerations is that, in this case, the names of many highly 
respectable men are connected with the enterprise, while 
the property itself possesses a merit which might have been 
developed on a more moderate scale, devoid of features 
which are simply ludicrous. The very fact ff offering a 
deposit of ore alleged to be worth $80,000,000 in gold for 
such a trifling sum as *2.ooii .11110 ought in itself to put in- 
vestors on their guard. Such extreme generosity upon 
the part of the promoters is not one of their usual charac- 
teristics. Passing over such estimates in the prospectus 
as 250 stamps dropping continuously on surface ores for 
fifty or one hundred years, the system of calculation which 
evolves an area of 1395 acres out of eleven quartz claims, 
and some of them not even full claims at that, is some- 
thing which passes understanding. The most that expert 
mining men in this city can make of the figures as given 
in this prospectus is 104 acres. If all were the full twenty 
acres which constitute a quartz claim 1500x000, the total 
would only sum up 220 acres, and yet one of the report- 
ing engineers makes out an area of 1395.56 acres for the 
eleven claims, and the mistake goes uncorrected by the 
rest engaged with him in reporting on the property. 

The property owned by this company is located on the 
east branch of the North Fork of the Feather River, in 
Plumas County, near Rush Creek. Of the eleven claims 
mentioned the Halstead is the chief and the backbone of 
the whole concern. An effort was made some time ago to 
float the mine in London for $700,000, the quotation nearer 
home being in the neighborhood of $75,000. The value of 
the ore has never been placed at over $5, while the present 
vendors figure it at $8. The cost of working visiting ex- 
perts have estimated at $2 per ton; the ten million ton 
gentlemen make it $1.35. There is no mystery here about 
the value of this property or the development of it. At a 
fair figure it must be considered a promising investment. 
Quite a number of prominent experts have inspected it 
from time to time, so there should be no difficulty in get- 
ing at the true facts. As it stands now the property has, 
it is evident, been loaded to the guards with commissions, 
which should be docked to start with. As for the ten or 
eleven million tons of ore available, it is only charitable to 
presume that a mistake has been made in the matter of 
calculation like there has been in computing the acreage 
of the eleven quartz locations. We would suggest that the 
" Bird's Eye View " of these Great Northern Gold Mines 
accompanying the prospectus (not drawn to scale) with 
the great yellow streak, representing 10,000,000 tons of 
$8 ore, trailed from the river bottom over mountain and 
canon, not omitting the "canawl," until it disappears over 
the ridge of a snow peak that might be mistaken for Mt. 
Shasta or Mt. Hood, be framed and made a permanent ex- 
hibit at the forthcoming Jubilee festival. It is certainly 
the biggest thing in the line of mining (on paper) hitherto 
produced in California. 

The London and Globe Finance Cor- 
A Plum for poration, which has scored such a 
British Investors, success in Westralian mines, and in 
fact in everything it has so far had 
anything to do with, seems to have stolen quite a march on 
our great American promoters. Under the skillful manage- 
ment of Mr. Whitaker Wright, whose name will be familiar 
to many of the old-time mining men of California, the Lon- 
don and Globe has just brought out the British America 
Corporation, Limited, which absorbs, in addition to some 
valuable mines in British Columbia and a number of claims 
in the Klondike in active operation, the old-established 
business of the Alaska Commercial Company. The repre- 
sentatives of the company in this city have denied through 
the local papers that they are negotiating a sale of their 
property. This is literally true, if London advices are 



correct that the negotiations are closed, placing the mat- 
ter in the past instead of the present tense in discussing 
the project for publication. From all accounts the issue 
of £1,500,000 was well received by the public, and the sub- 
scriptions largely exceeded tke amount of shares available 
for allotment. Lord Dufferin is President of the corpora- 
tion, and it is just probable that either the Marquis of 
Lome or the Duke of Fife will be on the Board of Di- 
rectors. The profits of the Alaska Commercial Company 
for the past twenty-six years are stated to have been 
$21,000,000, and the price at which its property is taken 
over by the London and Globe is $3,000,000, the future 
profits to go to the British American Company. The 
property referred to consists of wharves, real estate, 
warehouses, stores, trading stations for over 8,000 miles, 
steamers, and everything in the way of stores and plant at 
northern depots; stores at Circle City, Forty-Mile Creek 
and Dawson City; stores and land at Fort Selkirk; one- 
half interest in claims on Sweetlarutsku River; one-half in- 
terest in claims on Stewart River; one-fourth interest in 
eleven claims on Bonanza and El Dorado Creeks; twenty 
adjoining claims in heart of Bonanza Creek, said to be 
among the richest in Klondike; claim No. 21 on Bear 
Creek; claim No. 2 on El Dorado Creek, said to yield 
£1,000 per running foot. Seven men working five hours a ■ 
day took out last winter in seventy days nearly £20,000 in 
gold. This flotation will place Whitaker Wright in ihe 
front rank of promoters in London, with a backing in this 
Klondike undertaking which is likely to keep him there. 
With the influence of the Alaska Commercial Company 
and its immense resources at command, other concerns 
locating in the Klondike will be small fry in the estimation 
of the public, whatever they may be in their own. It is 
pleasant to note that on the recent retirement of Charles 
Kaufman from the management of Lakeview and Ivanhoe 
mines at Westralia, Mr. Wright has appointed Henry C. 
Callahan, the well-known California mining engineer, in 
his place as manager and representative of the London 
and Globe Corporation at Coolgardie. This will be pleas- 
ing news for Mr. Callahan's numerous friends in this State. 
His advancement has been steady since he left here under 
engagement with this company, and he is well entitled to 
all the credit he has earned in his profession. 

Financiers of high and iow degree on the 
Bad Break m other side of the Atlantic interested in 
Anacondas "Anacondas," are greatly excited over a 
drop of something like thirty per cent in 
the value of the shares. The misfortune was that the 
break took place before any information was given the 
great bulk of the shareholders, who felt satisfied in turn 
that a favored few were permitted to realize before any 
publicity was given of change in conditions at the mines. 
The explanation came along later, after the slump had 
taken place in values, but it did not serve to allay the 
feeling of dissatisfaction nor save the exploration company 
from scathing comments in the financial press. One 
prominent paper goes the length of saying "that the ab- 
sence of authoritative information is far from creditable to 
those in control of the business on both sides of the Atlan- 
tic, and it is calculated to increase the disinclination 
among British investors to put their capital into 'Yan- 
kee undertakings.' " In view of the fact that Mr. Carl 
Meyer, a large shareholder in the Anaconda, retired from 
the house of N. M. de Rothschild & Sons at the first of the 
year, there may be some truth in the statement that he 
marketed his stock and helped to lower the price in con- 
nection with reduced output, accredited to repairs of flues 
and furnaces. 

Mr. Wyndham, British Consul at Bar- 
Hidden Treasures celona, warns people all over the 
in Spain. world to beware of swindlers who are 

attempting to defraud by means of 
circulars which promise their victims large shares in cer- 
tain hidden treasures in Spain. They have received many 
remittances, in some cases the sums being large. Mr. 
Wyndham has succeeded in stopping payment of a number 
of these drafts, one of which was for the sum of £760 on a 
Valencia bank from a gentleman in Australia. The names 
of two of these swindlers are known to be Juan Carbonell 
and James Latorre. The circulars, which are scattered 
broadcast through the mart", are said to contain a plaus- 
ible story of possible profits resulting from an investment. 



January 8, 1898. 



SAX PRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



'3 




•• Uemrlhc Crier!" 'What • t.o devil art IhouJ" 
"One thai wlllplav the devil. sir. with you." 

THE developments of the Capron will case brings to 
public attention the use of morphine, and the fact is. 
it is far more generally used than has ever been suspected. 
The extent of this practise is only known to physicians. 
It is declared on good authority that there are hundreds 
of well-known people in this city — both men and women — 
who are habitual users of this drug, and to whom it is also 
urged that morphine is a boon instead of a curse. The 
poor miserable wretch to whom life is loathsome, and who 
has recourse to morphine takes it in doses which ultimately 
destroys him physically as well as mentally, and of these 
people we only hear when taken to the City and County 
Hospital as morphine fiends. But it is put forward that 
the person of strong will power who uses morphine 
judiciously finds in the use of the drug a stimulant. It is 
to be sincerely hoped that this argument will not prevail 
and that such reasoning will not induce people to use it. 
The habitual user of morphine, and there are many, urge 
that its consumption does not impair the brain, and point 
to the late "Wilkie Collins as an exemplar to prove their 
faith. The great novelist was a sufferer from neuralgia 
and when writing the Moonstone took daily a wineglass- 
fulof laudanum, and which his publisher, the day after his 
death, said was enough to kill a whole company of gren- 
adiers. When we come to consider the immense amount of 
opium that is imported into this county the fact stares us in 
the face that its consumption is decidedly on the increase — 
why $167,000 was paid into the Custom House alone on the 
last trip of the China on one importation as duty. This 
increase deserves inquiry. 

THERE is nothing more agreeable to human vanity 
than to be regarded as a fine writer. A local 
litterateur, God save the mark, shines forth as a brilliant 
flame of the style called "what is it?" in this too awfully, 
awfully, gorgeous sentence in an alleged Eastern magazine 
called "The Black Cat:" "Still, as they were setting out 
to be agreeable, I could do no less, and the supper, in 
which I tasted anew the finger of woman, swelled the 
remnant of my gregariousness." Good God what a canni- 
bal the man is to be sure to taste not only at this remark- 
able supper "the finger of woman," but "anew" to swell 
not his disgust — but his "gregariousness." No wonder this 
fellow is on the Sunday Examiner. Mr. Hearst deter- 
mines to be singular — even to the employment of cannibals 
who taste woman's fingers "anew." 

THERE is nothing so beautiful in the world as a wide 
charity. There is a gentleman in this city who can 
honestly lay claim to that distinction both by birth and 
education, and who has, for the reason that there are no 
other avenues open to him for making money, started a 
livery stable. A young man who hires or stables a horse 
there, and whose father once sold buttons on a tray sus- 
pended from his shoulders by a strap, spoke thus of him : 
"Oh, you know, I quite pity him, for he is almost as well 
born as myself." 

GENERAL Walter Turnbull has been receiving the 
congratulation of his many friends on the wondrous 
growth of his hair. The General, for the past few years, 
has been growing somewhat shy of capillaries on the part 
where the hair ought to grow, and his sudden acquisition 
of a good hirsute covering filled his friends who were also 
short on hair with considerable curiosity. It was discov- 
ered that the General had not discovered a new hair re- 
storer, but bad a wig made to order. 

THE members of the Stock and Bond Exchange were 
delighted with the news that Mr. Tony Hellman, 
whose generosity is proverbial, had made a present, or 
was about to make a present, of a rare Japanese gold-fish 
to fill the bowl which adorns the Exchange. Many were 
the congratulations he received which were, however, not 
recorded on the minutes when it was discovered that this 
curious gold-fish was made of tin. 



THE streets of Krarny and Market presented a live]; 
spectacle on tin- eve of the New Year, and it can 
be Bald it was an edifying sight. Hosts of pi 
well dressed and otherwise, paraded those thoroughfares, 
making diabolical noises with every instrument they could 
lay hands on. Most noticeable In the throng were the 
young girls who. without any shadow of escort, took part 
In the melee and accosted familiarly strangers or friends 
with either a greeting In the form of a congratulation or 
B vigorous tap on the head with their tin horns. It was 
a nice sight certainly, and there is no doubt that many a 
girl began the new year with the wish that it would have 
been better for her to have stayed at home than in stroll- 
ing the streets like a vagrant. There was neither sense 
nor fun in the performances that were enacted last Friday 
night — and the young hoodlums who joined hands and 
made rushes through the densely-packed mass, ought 
promptly to have been arrested and have been made to 
spend the night in jail. 

" ^yOU are troubled with insomnia, are you?" said the 
I doctor, looking with anxious eyes at his forlorn 
patient. " I am," replied the unhappy man; "I cannot 
sleep— even the most powerful opiates have no effect upon 
me." "Is that so," answered the medical man. "It is, 
doctor," sighed the sufferer; " can you give me nothing to 
relieve me ? " The doctor thought for a moment, and then 
his face brightened. "I know," he said, gaily; " I have 
an efficacious remedy. Buy weekly Tom Plyun's paper, 
A. J. Waterhouse's jokes in the yellow sheet, and all John 
Bonner's articles. Read tbem daily, and you will fall to 
sleep without failure. " ' 'Great Heavens!" cried the agonized 
patient, "do you know, doctor, that you would have made 
a famous inquisitor. No such awful torture was ever even 
inflicted upon a Christian martyr." 

MR. LEROY G. HARVEY is certainly a gentleman 
who talks too much, and when he talks he talks fool- 
ishly and at random. There are few men who openly con- 
fess themselves as boss bribers, but Mr. Harvey has the 
opinion that most people are about as corrupt as himself. 
His somewhat flagrant statement that he could purchase 
the acquiescence of any daily paper by a presentation of 
$25,000 smacks somewhat of the ridiculous. Newspapers 
are not generally run by fools, though every fool thinks he 
can manage a newspaper, and no proprietor would be so 
rash as to trust to a talker — for of all fools the fool who 
talks too much is the worst. Mr. Harvey has forever 
killed himself in the noble business of buying silence and 
acquiescence. 

SOME students at the Stanford University secured for 
themselves much disgrace and reprimand by inno- 
cently living up to their idea of how to honor their Alma 
Mater by looking on the wine when it was red. It is sin- 
gular that they should have achieved punishment instead 
of praise. There is in the mind of Professor Jordan a hor- 
ror for all kinds of liquor, and he, in and out of season, 
inveighs against its use. Know ye not, oh wise philoso- 
pher, that your very salary comes from the proceeds of 
the sales of liquor — brandy — Vina brandy — and that the 
main support of the place over which you preside comes 
from the sale of alcoholic drinks? 

DEEPLY as one must sympathize with the person who 
has met accident by the street cars and with the 
relatives of the one who has been killed, yet the question 
must arise: was there not some carelessness on the part of 
the person thus hurt or killed. The motorman exercises as 
much caution as he can, he keeps up a continuous ringing at 
crossings where there is any sign of danger, but the trou- 
ble is that people have an idea that the motorman should 
look out for them, and not they for the cars. In nine cases 
out of ten if the cause of accident was properly investi- 
gated it would be learned that the person hurt was alone 
to blame. 

THERE is a certain woman in this town accounted 
most rich and whose diamonds were the talk of two 
continents. Recently she went into a shop where glasses 
are sold and selected a silver rimmed pair. The urbane 
shopman suggested she buy gold ones. "Oh," said the 
unfortunate lady, "I really cannot afford a pair of gold 
glasses. I have to use the very cheapest things now." 
and if the worthy dealer could have found a pair of old 
horn spectacles they would have passed into her possession. 



«4 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER- 



January 8, 1898. 



BANKING. 



Bank of California, San Francisco. 

Capital and Surplus, $6,000,000 

WILLIAM ALVORD President I CHARLES R. BISHOP. .Vlce-Pres'l 

ALLEN M.CLAY Secretary THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

S. Prentiss Smith.. Ass't Cashier 1 1. F. Modi/ton 2d Ass't Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS. 
New York— Messrs. Laldlaw & Co.; the Bank of New York, N. B. A. 
BALTlMORE—The National Exchange Bank. Boston— The Tremont Na- 
tional Bank; Chicago— Illinois Trust and Savings Bank: Union National 
Bank. Philadelphia— National Bank of the Republic. ST. Louis— Boat- 
man's Bank. Virginia City (Nev.)— Agency of The Bank of California, 
London— Messrs. N. M.Rothschild & Sons; Paris— Messrs. de Roths- 
child Freres Berlin— Direction der Disconto Gesellschaft. China, 
Japan and East Indies— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China 
Australia and New Zealand— The Union Bank of Australia, Ltd., and 
Bank of New Zealand. 
Letters of Credit Issued available in all parts of the world. 

California Safe Deposit and Trust Company,. 

Cor. California and Montgomery Sts. 

Capital Fully Paid $1,000,000 

Transacts a general banking business 
and allows Interest on deposits payable on demand or after notice 

Acts as Executor, Administrator, and Trustee under wills or in any 
other trust capacity. Wills are drawn by the company's attorneys and 
are taken care of without charge. 

SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES to rent at prices from $5 per annum up- 
ward according to size, and valuables of all kinds are stored at low rates. 

Directors: J. D Fry, Henry Williams, I. G. Wickersham. Jacob C. 
Juhnson, James Treadwell, F. W. Lougee. Henry F. Fortmann, R B Wal- 
lace. R D. Fry. A. D. Sharon, and J. Dalzell Brown. 

Officers: J. D Fry, President; Henry Williams, Vice-President; R. 
D Fry, Second Vice-President; J. Dalzell Brown, Secretary and Treas- 
urer; E E.Shotwell, Assistant Secretary; Gunnison, Booth & Bartnett, 
Attorneys. 

London, Paris and American Bank, Limited. 

N.W. Cor. Sansome & Sutter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital 12.500,000 

Paid Up Capital 12,000.000 

ReserveFund I 850,000 

Head Owce. 40 Threadneedle Street, London, E. C. 

AGENTS— New York— Agency of the London, Paris, and American 
Bank Limited, No. 10 Wall Street, N. Y. Paris— Messrs. Lazard, FrereB 
& Cle, 17 Boulevard Polssonlere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the 
world. Commercial and Travelers' Credits Issued. 

SIG. GREENEBAUM I „.„._„.. 
C. ALTSCHUL {Managers. 

Grocker-Woolworth National Bank of S. F. 

Corner Market, Montgomery, 

and Post Streets. 

Patd-Up Capital 11,000,000 

W M . H CROCKER President 

W. E. BROWN Vice-President 

GEO. W. KLINE Cashier 

Directors— Chas. F. Crocker. E B. Pond, Hy. J.Crocker, Geo. W. Scott 

The San Francisco National Bank, 

Southeast Corner of Pine and Sansome streets, S. F. 

Ja- k Wilson. President. E. A. Brugcierb, Vice President. 

Lewis I. Cowgill, Cashier. 

Capital $500,000 

Directors: Jas. K. Wilson. E J. Staples, Wm Pierce Johnson, Geo. 
a. Pope, E. A. Bruguiere, Ed.G. Lukens. Charles C. Judson. 

Agents: New York— Hanov. r National Bank, Chase National Bank; 
Boston— National Bank of the Commonwealth. Philadelphia— Drexel & 
Co. Chicago— Continental National Bank. St. Louis— The Mechanics' 
Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London— Brown Shipley & 
Co. Paris— Morgan, Harjes & Ce. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

38 Post Street, below Kearny. Mechanics' Institute Building 
Guaranteed Capital 11,000,000 Pald-Up Capital 1300,000 

JAMES D. PHELAN. President. S. G. MURPHY, Vice-President. 
GEO. A. STORY. Cashier. JOHN A. HOOPER, Vice-President. 

Directors— James D. Phelan, L. P. Drerler, John A. Hooper, C. G. 
Hooker, James Moffltt, S. G. Murphy, Frank J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy, 
and Joseph D. Gram. 

Interest paid on Deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order, Wells. Fargo & Co , or Exchange 
on City Banks. When opening accounts send signatuie. 



San FrancisGo Savings Union. 

Corner California and Webb Streets. 

Deposits. Dec. 31. 1895 t24,4K,327 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus . . . 1,575,631 
ALBERT MILLER, President | E B. POND, Vice-President 
Directors— Thomas Magee. G w. Heaver, Philip Barth, Daniel E. Mar- 
tin, W. C. B. De Fromery, George C. Boardman, Robert Watt; Lovell 
White, Cashier. 

Receives Deposits, and Loans only on real estate security. Country 
remittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by oheckof reliable 
parties, payable In San Francisco, but the responsibility of this Savings 
Bank commences only with the actual receipt of the money. The signature 
of the depositor should accompany the first deposit. No charge is made for 
pass-book or entrance fee. Office hours— 9. A. 11. to 8 p. h. Saturday even- 
ings,6:30to8 




gM- -«~ lfe X So) 



Islands of the Southern Seas, Hawaii, Samoa, New Zealand, Tas- 
mania, Australia, and Java: by Michael Meyers Shoemaker. 
Illustrated. Published by G. I'. Putnam's Sons, New York and 
London. 1898. 

Mr. Shoemaker especially disclaims any serious histor- 
ical, social or political purpose in this volume, which is 
meant as a simple record of a trip. The leper settlement 
at Molokai and a visit to the volcano on the island of 
Hawaii are described. Thence the author takes us to 
Samoa and New Zealand. Though he expresses great ad- 
miration for the natural scenery of Auckland, he thir_ks 
that city a depressing place. There, and in other towns 
of New Zealand he was particularly struck with the lack 
of large or handsome houses. After visiting the Hot 
Lake region. Mr, Shoemaker went to Wellington, Christ- 
Church, Dunedin, and the New Zealand Alps. In his ac- 
count of the lovely island of Tasmania he devotes consider- 
able space to the old convict stations at Port Arthur and 
Point Puer. In Australia he visits Melbourne, Sydney, 
and Brisbane, and then goes on to Thursday Island, Singa- 
pore, and Java. Mr. Shoemaker rather naively assumes 
that, because he knew little or nothing of Australasia be- 
fore he went there, others are equally ignorant. As long 
ago as 1882 there were more than 120 books on New Zea 
land alone, and since that year many more have been pub- 
lished, to say nothing of almost countless articles in 
periodicals. However, as a mere narrative of a long and 
agreeable tour Mr. Shoemaker's volume may be said to 
fulfill its purpose. His solution of the Hawaiian question 
is so simple and sensible that we do not suppose it in the 
least degree likely to be adopted: it is that the United 
States and Great Britain should unite in guaranteeing 
autonomy to the Islands, in consideration for which Hawaii 
should give a neutral coaling station for the two nations 
and free entry for British and American products. His 
remarks on the "treating" so common in "the Colonies," 
and on the excessive legislation with which they, like the 
American States, are cursed, are apt and just. He also 
speaks truly when he says: "If there were more general 
travel by our Congressmen and men of affairs throughout 
the dominions of Great Britain, there would be a fuller 
understanding of her real feeling towards America, and 
of the great work she (England) is doing in the world, and 
there would also be less ignorant jingoism at home." But 
it is hard to see where he can have got his idea that 
"there is no native tree in the North Island of New Zea- 
land save the pine, and that all others, shrubs and trees, 
are imported." Yet in "New Zealand," by Dr. J. M. 
Moore, who lived for several years in Auckland, we find 
mention made of the totara, the rimu, and four other 
forest-trees, besides the kauri pine. In any Auckland 
tobacconist's shop may be found pipes made of puririvrooa, 
and even so hasty a tourist as Mr. Shoemaker ought to 
have made the acquaintance of the ti-tree, and of the 
pohutu-kaua, or New Zealand Christmas bush. In the 
Domain at Auckland are many of the beautiful tree-ferns, 
which in "the bush" grow to a height of thirty or forty 
feet. As is natural, Mr. Shoemaker is more felicitous 
when describing his own personal experiences than when 
commenting on the social or political facts of the countries 
he visits. He honestly confesses his surprise at learning 
that there arp five independent self-governing colonies in 
Australia, each with its own Governor, Legislative Coun- 
cil and House of Parliament. Yet the reading of any 
book on the Colonies, or a few minutes with a Whitaker's 
Almanac, would have informed him of these simple facts. 
Speaking of the knighthoods conferred on colonial public 
men he says: "The distribution of titles by the mother- 
court ry secures to her interest only those who foolishly 
e them: 1 say Foolishly, because they must see that 
tin v are bestowed for no special merit, on anybody and 
body . . Austral .1 is a country of such rapid reverses 
in fortune that Sir John Smith or Sir John Jones may to- 
morrow be relegated to the low rank and fortune from 



January 8, 1898. 



SAN FRANCISCO NBWS LETTER. 



'5 



which be arose last week. Now Zealand has taken the 

better course." This is pure 1. no Australian re- 

ceives a knighthood unless be has rendered to his Colony 
long and distinguished service as Premier, President of 
the Legislative Council, Speaker of the Lower House, 
Chief Justice, or in some other public capacity. And he 
is almost always a man with a lucrative law practice or a 
well-established business. Often ho is a very rich man, as 
Sir Samuel Wilson. Sir William Clarke, and Sir Thomas 
Elder. We have a close acquaintance with two of the 
colonies of Australasia, and know of nocolonial knight who 
has been " relegated to the low rank and fortune from 
which he arose last week." And. as titles are bestowed 
on the public men of New Zealand on precisely the same 
principles as on the public men of Australia, we are utterly 
at a loss to imagine what is meant by saving that " New 
Zealand has taken the better course." Though an author 
disclaims the intention of writiug a serious book, readers 
have a right to expect what he does say to be accurate. 
If Mr. Shoemaker (as is obvious) knows nothing of the 
principles on which Colonial public men are knighted, why 
offer any comments on them? But it really seems that 
an American writer caunot pass a man of title in the 
street without wishing to '" 'eave 'arf a brick " at him. 

In Java Mr. Shoemaker visited many ruined temples, 
and was much impressed with their great archaeological 
interest: the beauty of the tropical island and the kindli- 
ness of the Javanese also struck him. The book is well 
illustrated with many good photo-engravings, and will 
afford pleasant reading to those who are content with 
what Mr. Shoemaker himself calls "the journal of a trav- 
eler, with his impressions of the panorama of the world as 
it unrolls itself." 

" Seven Smiles and a Few Fibs," by Thomas J. Vivian. Published 
by F. Tennyson Neely, London and New York. 

Each of the " Seven Smiles " is a little story of eight or 
ten pages, presenting some risque situation, and ending 
with the words of its title: "And the waiter smiled," "And 
the widow smiled," and so on. Allot them are amusing 
and cleverly told, but perhaps the best is the one entitled 
"And the grandma smiled," because its complication is so 
serious and so ingenious. Of the "Few Fibs" the most 
gruesome is " Down to the Medulla," a tale of the removal 
of a man's brain bit by bit; the prettiest is the very short 
"He Kept the Engagement" : the most objectionable is 
" How I Had 'Em," a description of an attack of delirium 
tremens: and the most amusing is the Fenian plan "To 
Freeze Out England" by diverting the Gulf Stream. The 
scenes of many of the stories are laid in or about San Fran- 
cisco. The tales are clever, but Mr. Vivian seems to have 
acquired that taste for the creepy and the horrible which 
long familiarity with the daily papers of this country al- 
most inevitably breeds. The journalist looks at life and 
all its phenomena from the standpoint of a reporter search- 
ing for what in his miserable ] argon he terms "a scoop"; 
only the sensational and the abnormal attract him. His 
"stories" reek of the whiskey-saloon and of hot, cramped, 
malodorous dens, where overworked and overheated slaves 
of the pen write furiously against time, with a "devil" at 
their elbow waiting for "copy." 

Our British contemporary, The Academy, has been en- 
tertaining itself and its readers by drawing up a list of 
forty persons worthy to be included in a British Academy 
of Letters. In this list appear the names of two women, 
(Mrs. Meynell and Mrs. Thomas Humphry Ward,) of one 
American, (Henry James,) and of three clergymen, of whom 
one, the Rev. Aidan Gasquet, is entirely unknown to us. 
Nor would it require much space to tell all we know 
of Dr. Salmon, W. P. Ker, W. B. Yeats, and Theodore 
Watts-Dunton. Yet Dr. Nicoll speaks of Mr. Watts-Dun- 
ton as "undoubtedly the first of living critics, and per- 
haps the first of all English critics." Apropos of this pro- 
posed British Academy, the London Punch prints a most 
amusing imaginaiy letter from Emil Zola: 

" The Morgue, Pabis-SiV Punch, Mister: Hope deferred— as one 
says— makes the core bilious. Here they will not have me at no 
price, try all I will. But vou, you have tbe nose fine for merit. Al- 
beit, in effect, not of Angio-Saxon provenance, I am traveller. I 
have made the grand voyage of the Sleeve. See there, then, I speak 
the English. yes 1 Alright. Agree etc. Em— l Z— l— ." 



Did anybody 
ever object t<> a 



anywhere 
Macbeth 
lamp-chimney ? 

Hut £et the Number marie 
for your limp. Get the Index. 

Write Macbeth Pilttburgh Pa 



BANKING. 
Bank of British Golumbia. 

Southeast Cur. Bush and Sansomb Sts. 
Incorporated by Royal Charter, 1882. 

Capital Paid Up .18,000,000 

Reserve Fund t 500,000 

HEADOFPICE 60 Lombard Street, London 

Branches— Victoria, Vancouver, New Westminster, Kamloops, Nan- 
lamo, Nelson, Sandon, and Kaslo, British Columbia; Portland, Oregon 
This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commeroiai Credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents, as follows: 

New York— Merchants' Bank of Canada; Chicago— First National Bank; 
Liverpool— North and South Wales Bank; Scotland— British Linen 
Company; Ireland— Bank of Ireland; Mexico— London Bank of Mexico; 
South America — London Bank of Mexico and South America; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China; Australia and 
New Zealand — Bank of Australasia and Commeroiai Banking Company ot 
Sydney, Ld ; Demehaha and Trinidad (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 

The ftnglo-Galifornian Bank, Limited. 

Capital authorized $6,000,000 

Subscribed 8,000,000 

Paid Up 1,600,000 

Reserve Fund 700,000 

N. E. Cor. Pine and Sanso e Sts 
Head Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Sellgman & Co., 21 Broad street. 

The Bank transacts a General Banking Business, sells drafts, makes 

telegraphic transfers, and Issues letters of oredit available throughout the 

world. Sends bills f or collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 

and bullion. IGN. STEINHART ) MarmirArn 

P. N. LILIENTHAL f Managers 

The German Savings and Loan SoGietu. 

No. 526 California Street. San Francisoo 

Guarantee capital and surplus $2,109,000 99 

Capital actually paid up In cash.. 1,000 000 00 
Deposits December 31, 1897 26,::69,633 36 

OFFICERS: President, B A. Beoker; First Vice-President, Daniel 
Meyer; Second Vice-President, H. Horstmau; Cashier, A. H. R Schmidt; 
Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann; Secretary, George Tourny ; Assist- 
ant Secretary, A. H. Muller; Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS : B A. Becker, Daniel Meyer. H. Horst- 
mann, Ign. Steinhart, N. Van Bergen, E. Rohte, H. B. Russ, D. N. 
Walter and N. Ohlandt. 

Wells Faroo & Go.'s Bank. 

N. E. Corner Sansome & Sutter Streets 

John J. Valentine President 

Homer S. King Manager 

H. Wadsworth Cashier 

F. L. Ltpman Assistant Cashier 

Cash Capital and Surplus .$6,250,000 

BRANCHES. 
N. Y. City, H. B. Parsons, Cashier, j Salt Lake City. J. E. Dooly, Cashier 
PorLland, Or.. R M. Dooly, Cashier. 
Directors— John J. Valentine, Benj. P. Cheney, Oliver Eldridge, Henry 

E. Huntington, Homer S. King, George E. Gray, John J. McCook, John 
Bermingham, Dudley Evans. 

Swiss American Bank 0[ L ARN0 ' Switzerland, and 
California Mortgage & Savings Bank, f&Siffir' 

Paid-up Capital and Reserves, $620,000. 

A general savings and commercial banking business transacted. Inter- 
est paid on savings deposits. Loans on approved real estate security, and 
on commercial paper. 

DIRECTORS— Ernst A. Denicke, A. Sbarboro J. C. Rued, E. Marttnonl, 

F. C. Siebe, A. Tognazzini, H Brunner, McD R. Venable, A. G. Wieland, 
F. Kronenberg. Charles Martin, C. Gehret.P. Tognazzini, S. Grandi. 

Securitu Savings Bank. 

222 Montgomery St.. Mills Building. 
INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. 
LOANS MADE. 

DIRECTORS. 

William Alvord 3- L. Abbot Jr. H. H. Hewlett 

Wm Babcock O. D- Baldwin E. J. McCutchen 

Adam Grant W. S. Jones R. H- Pease 

ttUMBOLDT SAVINGS ftND LOftN SOCIETY. 

No. 18 Geary Street. 

Directors: Adolph C. Weber, President; W. J. Lowry, Vice-Presi- 
dent; ErnestBrand, Secretary; W. S. Keyes; I. Kohn; G. H Lucbsinger: 
C. E. Hatch, Attorney. 




SAN FRAN-CISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 8, 1898. 



"Seems to me I've seen your face 
before," said the judge, peering 
through his spectacles. "Yes, your 
honor, you have," replied the prisoner, 
'lam the professor who gives the 
young lady next door to you lessons on 
the piano." "Six years!" came from 
the judge, quickly.— Yonkers States- 
man. 

"Hello, William," remarked Milton 
to Shakespeare, "what are you doing 
— studying your own works'.'" "Not 
exactly, John," replied the dramatist. 
"I am reading some of these nine- 
teenth century articles and trying to 
discover whether Hamlet was insane 
or not."— San Francisco Examiner. 

"Did you tell that young man not 
to call here any more?" asked Mabel's 
father severely. "N— no." Why 
not?" "I didn't think it was neces- 
sary. I don't see how he could call 
any more now. He calls seven times 
a week. — Washington Star. 

"l« there any one hymn you would 
prefer to have rendered at the — er — 
ceremonies?" asked the kind friend. 
"My favorite," said the dying hotel 
keeper, "has always been 'Abide with 
Me.' " — Cincinnati Enquirer. 

Mr. Murray Hill— It isodd what queer 
effects colors have upon persons. 
Mr. Point Bree/.e— What effects are 
you thinking of? Ms. Murray Hill 
—On a gray day I am always blue. 
— Pittsburg Chronicle Telegraph. 

He asked if he could kiss her and 
naturally she blushed very prettily. 
"I don't know whether you can or 
not,'' she said, "but if you can't you're 
not a very strong man.' — Chicago 
Post. 

Mr. Borem — Can you suggest any- 
thing, Miss Cutting, that would tend 
toward the improvement of my con- 
versation? Miss Cutting — You might 
try occasional silence. — Chicago News. 

"Dodsworth, your wife seems to be 

a woman of commanding presence." 

'Commanding presence! By Jove, 

sir, my wife can command when she is 

absent." — Chicago Record. 

She — Did you ever hug a delusion? 
He — Well, yes; I hugged a girl, this 
summer, that I was foolish enough to 
think some day would be my wife. — 
Yonkers Statesman. 

"I know why you football men never 
get your hair cut." "Well, why is 
it?" "You need all your money to 
buy arnica." — Chicago Record. 

"Was he secretary or treasurer of 
the company?' "Well, they supposed 
he was only secretary until after he 
had gone." — Chicago Journal. 

Great Drop in Drugs. 
Dear Editor— We are selllDp almost every 
Udowd drug and remedy, evrry i:onwn Instru- 
ment and appliance, at lowest wholesale prices. 
Some rem> dies others sell as high as t'.OO to 
12 00, our price is *2->c Our special Drug Cata- 
logue will be sent free postpaid to any of your 
readers who will cut this notice out and send to 
us. Very truly. 

Sears, Roebuck & Co., Chicago, 111. 




" I say, old man, my wife's out and I can't find a thing to 
offer you except this plug of Piper Heidsieck Tobacco." 

'■ Well, don't you know by this time that's the only thing I 
ever indulge in ? " __^ 

There is but one best and that one is 

Piper Heidsieck 

Plug Tobacco ,c rrr 

Get a NEW FIVE-CENT PIECE of your dealer: 40 per 
cent, larger than before. 



J. D. Spreckels & Bros. Co. GE.0RGE GOODMAN. 



Shipping and Commission Mer- 
chants. General agents 



Patentee and Manufacturer of 



Oceanic Steamship Company. 

Gillingham Cement. 

327 Market St.. cor. Fremont, S. P. 



George Morrow, & Go., 

(Established IBM ) 

ttftY AND GRAIN 

Gomrnlsslon Merchants. 
Warehouse 526 Seventh St. 

122 Clay street, S. F. Tel. Main 85 



Artificial Stone, 



In all its branches 
ISchlllinger's Patent] 

Side walk and Garden walk a specialty 
Office: 307 Montgomery street (Nevada block 
San Francisco, 

BUSWELL GO., 

Bookbinder. Paper-Ruler, Printer 
and Blank Book Manufacturer. 
51« Commercial St.. S. P. 



January 8. 1898. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



'7 



INSURANCE 

I'RANCE I er Andrew J. Clunichas re 

to license the Law. Onion ami Crown t'l wl icb w:i~ re- 
cently brought from Kngland by Cation, Bell & Co., who 
are appointed Doited Stales managers. This acti 
the Commissioner is based on lis contention that a foreign 
corporation having a portion of its capital stock unpaid is 
privileged beyond Dome companies in being permitted to 
do business within this State. 

Commissioner Clur.i-; has finally, and after many pre- 
liminary skirmishes, issued his ultimatum to the foreign 
insurance companies, in which he demands of them the 
payment of something like $280,000. This action is taken 
by the Commissioner under the act of March 1, 1885, 
which requires foreign companies to pay annually 1 per 
cent, on their premiums to the Treasurer of every county 
ii the Slate for the benefit of the firemen's relief fund of 
such county or city. A decision making the enactment 
was obtained from the Supreme Court of California in 188b', 
in which it was held that inasmuch as the law imposed a 
municipal tax it was invalid. There has never been a de- 
termined effort made to collect the one per cent, from the 
foreign companies, and thus if the Commissioner should be 
able to overturn the decision referred to, one per cent, on 
the entire business for the past twelve years will be col- 
lected. As this totals $5,527,321 38, the exact amount 
due would be $279,530.98. Under the Commissioner's 
coerci.'e demand this payment must be made before the 
1st of February, or he will refuse to grant permission for 
continuance of business in California. The general feeling 
is that a stubborn resistance will be made. 

The new California-street building of the Alliance Insur- 
ance Company is now completed, and the Alliance and 
Commercial Union have moved in. The insurance com- 
panies doing business in their own buildings in this city are 
the Aliiance, Liverpool and London and Globe, Pacific 
Mutual, Home Mutual, Firemans Fund, Mutual Life of 
New York, Royal, and New Zealand. 

Myron C. Dusenbury, President of the International In- 
demnity Company of this city, gave a dinner to his agents 
on Thursday last. 

"W. H. Dunphy, manager of the Home Life, has returned 
from l. three months' visit to Southern California. 

James S. Osborne, of the Phoenix Mutual, has taken up 
quarters in the Ciaus Spreckels building, which is now the 
home of the Provident Savings Life, the Penn Mutual, and 
the National Surety. 

Louis F. Payn has sent out a circular letter to the Insur- 
ance Commissioners of the different States, including Cali- 
fornia, to the effect that it is the intention of his depart- 
ment to charge only such fees and taxes to insurance com- 
panies of other States as may be exacted by the New 
York companies. 

W. P. Weyman, the newly-appointed manager of the 
Merchants, of Newark, has secured the premises formerly 
occupied by the Pacific Surety Company on Sansome 
street. The Surety Company now occupies quarters in 
the Safe Deposit Building. 

The newly formed firm of Boggs & Stovel, coast agents 
of the Fire Insurance Company of Boston, has settled down 
to business at 213 Sansome street. 

The Philadelphia Underwriters enters the State for busi- 
ness this month. T. C. Shankland will be coast agent, re- 
porting to Chicago. J. M. Beck of the Chicago office will 
remain in California during the winter, and maintain gen- 
eral supervision over the affairs of the Philadelphia Un- 
derwriters and the Fire Association. The former con- 
tract is backed by the Insurance Company of North 
America and the Fire Association of Philadelphia. 

Following the action of the Travelers' in withdrawing 
from Kansas, the Mutual Life Insurance Company of New 
York announces its intention of leaving that State until 
another Insurance Commissioner shall have been appointed 
to succeed McNall. The Mutual Life has many millions of 
life insurance in force in Kansas, the premiums on which 
are in the neighborhood of a quarter of a million of dollars 
anm a ly. 

Those two old veterans, President Staples of the Fire- 
mans Fund and Harry Mann, of Mann & Wilson, have en- 
tirely recovered from a severe illness. 



The Fidelity Mutual Life - been having 

trouble with thi- oner, Mr. < ■ refused, 

■ ■ the n-.'<ii l> ol the AssOl ialiOD, 

but every thine is undei stood to b iow. 

Most of the life c panics wrote increased 

notably ti 1 Mutual, the 
Central and the Washington, 



INSURANCE. 



FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 



Firemans Fund 



INSURANCE COMPANY, OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Capital, $1,000,000. Assets, $3,500,000. 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited), OF MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 
SOLID SECURITY. OVER $9,000,000.00 RESOURCES 



CHAS. A. LATON, Manager 
Fire Insurance. 



I California St., S, F. 



CONNECTICUT FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF HARTFORD. 

Capital Paid Up 11,000.000 

Assets * 3 300,018 

Surplus to Policy Holders 1,668,332 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager. 
COLIN M, BOYD. N. W. Cor. Sjcramento and Montgomery Sts. S F. 



BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSURANCE CO., LIMITED, 

OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital 16,700,000 

BALFOUR, SUTHRIE & CO., Agents. 

No. 318'Callfornlast., S. F' 



Founded A. D. 179? 



Insurance Company ot North America 

OF PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 

Paid up Capital • 13,000.000 

Surplus to Policy Holders 5,022,018 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent, 412 California St., S. F. 



PHOENIX ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON Established usa. 
PROVIDENCE-WASHINGTON INSURANCE CO. i»»or P oratea 1799 

BUTLER & HALDAN, General Agents, 

413 California St., S. F. 



THE THURINGIA INSURANCE COMPANY. 

Of ERFURT, GERMANY. 
Capital. $2,250,000 Assets. $W,°84. 248. 
Pacific Coast Department: 2 4-208 SANSOME ST., S. F. 

VOSS. CONRAD & CO., General Managers. 



Accident Employers Liability and Fidelity Bonds Insurance. 

THE GUARANTORS FINANCE COMPANY OF PHILADELPHIA. 

ARTHUR C DON NELL, Gen Agent Pacific Coast. 401 Calllornia St. 

-riir imil FIRE INSURANCE CO . Limited, of London. 

IHt LIUN Total cssh assets in United States. $88 .797 09 
-rnr iiinrriu; INSURANCE CO Limited, of London. 

IHt IIVIrbnlAL E-tablished on Pacific Coast in lt52 

WILLIAM J LANOERS Resident Manager. 
Pacific Coast Branch: 2)5-207 Sansome St., San fiuncisco, Cal. 



■ R 



SAN FRANCISCO NIvWS LETTER, 



January 8, 1898. 



%M°$\mB». 



I fori tl ■ in |oi ij in. 11 artists, 
1 mi ■ ■• rton and II er Davenport, are posing 

"in, I, 1,. 1 he joy ni 1 1 1 1 1 e bi u h ana 

hapi in in' .1 |i .1 in ce were 1 heir 

.I pati "ii i' 'I'm' 1 i.ii brop i'. responsible for the 

ii \\ in ni" i"i appeared In 1 iotbam, 

Lathrop hunted up hli old Liohemlan Club Friend Emll 

I hi 1 'i now, ai ih. 'ii, in t hi' cic|iiiis nf 

financial despair, feu Emll was always a bowling success 

'i p. mil in,.' |u, 1 ures, i'iii ;i iir. in, ii failure at dlspoi Ins ol 

iiii-in 1 1 1 thins ' nerefore, that 1 here « v\r 

plot ures in Oarl en' tudlo 1 ban 1 bell lea In bis 

"i \ 

" Youi oontraol hai a long time to run," remarked 

Lathrop, nasuolly, to Davenport, wl d 

pel wr.i., 1 "i inn 1. ,11 under the terms of a dooumenl 

clra« 11 up bj b Ib« yei "Vi in don't you ui 1 ol 

1 lea 1 1 '. in 1 "i in," ■■ ■ ".ni. 1 ploi 11 

Null ted to Carlson's studio, where some 

1 ■ ■ " -'ii his fanoy He bought two and 

aftei be went toWa 1 seut Car lsen a commission, 

ihi ,1 1 fourth niul u iim h 

" Now thai you llonalre, .li ile," said Lathrop 

in ,sw Innerton, "» by don 1 you help Emll 1 
Ami Hi" youthful husband of the mine owner was also 

"i" 1 .' Li. 1 1. in a pug nosed little 

' Hi" \ ' 1 Si hool 1 "i ". » ben 1 Idi lsen » as last > ui tor 
i"i the Ui oolatton, bi d h patronising his foi 

Irnl Of ha .-an\ ascs. 

Cai "- ■ I01 he 1 1 egular meals bi 

satisfied thirst He dallj Its blesslugs on Johnny 

Lathrop arl 

1 1 i" bi dip 1 » n that Ambrose Blerce is 

■ hlnjj pending .ill his aval 
leisure with his rod and line Another peculiarity of the 
d humored prattler is bisanllpath 
■ in in iout 1 brae quarten 

Bitting one day on the hunk of the Los Gatos Creek, 
re, ami Incidentally thinking of kindlj ana 
: " s,.\ .ii, Vmbrose was 

\ shorl 
hind ii..- . anlne, »l rode .1 ■ lug rustic, 

ii Si Bernard. 
Blerce wl i„, always goes armed 

"ii your dog,' he houted, warnlugly, t 1 the 
countryman 

'Oh, that therei II right," drawled the native, 

" II,' WOn'l Inn I 

''Take him away, 01 loreamed the belligerent 

in .i paroxj -in oi fear. 
The ins', '.isi, urn, and to bring 

him to iiinii oi ii,,' seriousness of the situation, 

■ '. and the dog dropped In his tra< ks 
" • told you 1 «.- Ambrose, triumph 

lis your own fault, though." 
"That's all right," drawlod the Mow. "He's not mi 

Otto Dobbertln visited Willis ivik the other day, ami at 
the hour of noon found the sybaritic architect still In bed 
Vfter stretching hlrasi e« times and wishing Ins vis 
i\o\- had called at a more opportune moment, the gay and 
put his hand under his lace pillow and 
drew forth ,1 handsome ... chronometer 

.1- I - eyes sparkled with 
your tloker, Willis? 1 thought 
the Shei iff ha.l taken care ot your belongings 

" ssmllc smile, and Instead of answering 

the qui ms( U p w t | K , snee ( S lllu | 

treated his viMtoi 1 ■ iwlng: 

- n to paj inv respet I 

an avuncular rela line" here Dobbertiu sighed 

sympathet a him to advance me a hundred 

on this watch. The tbiug is worth fom- hundred and 



1 11 Hi" man pii I ed It "1 I ■ "an to examine care- 
fully the cover and face. Finally beopened the back, read 
something Inscribed therein, shook his head and returned 
1 he beasl iy bauble to me, 

"Vou can imagine my disgust when, after opening it 
again, 1 found the following written in a clear hand on a 
imall pli ce ol papei and pasted inside 1 hi 1 

' To Pawnbrokers Thla watch hi the property of Jullen Smith; 
loaned to Willis Polk. 1 

"Well, I put It in my pooket and walked out. But I got 
even with the fellow after all." 

"How was thai 7" queried 1 lobbertin, 

"Why, l went i.. the City Hall and put the Tax Col- 
lector onto him, and while ho pays for his watch I have 
the pleasure of wearing it. Now you know how it comes 
to be under my pillow Instead ><f on the shelf." 
# # * 

The habitues of the University Chili have been intensely 

Interested and Inwardly convulsed at the post-marital 
revelations of a verj young benedlot, He had been an ex- 
ceedingly fashionable baohelor kid and was, nol long ago, 
amid great eclal transmuted into a hem diet He com 
plains whimsically that he la disappointed In his wife, He had 
though! ii' 'i i"' "' marrying a plump and buxom maiden, 
i ii 1 1 he has discovered, since the ceremony, thai her gowna 

wri" pulled and padded, so stretched and stuffed that 
there was much less of her than he Imagined, The In ides 

iicii'i Be w as Ingenious, if m>i unique. 

" Am I not your lawfully waddid wife?" she asked 

demurely, 

» * « 

All through the glad Christmastide, Wharfinger Thomas 
Neverk ill Casey bad been deliberately avoiding his most 

Intimate fr ds Ever since the opening of toe seasnn, 

he had been making his acquaintances cm ions with stones 
of bis marvellous skill with the shot gun, and conci rning 

the Imi. which invariably brought him hoc.:, with a 
heavily laden game bag. After a time, these rem 

" .in to pall on his bearers, although Tom never 

tired in the narration. 

They carefully planned "a Christmas sneak , " the Mr- 1 
i which was an invitation to shoot ducks ;,| lie 



The germs of consump- 
tion arc everywhi 

There is no way but to 
fight them. 

1 1 there is a history of 
weak lungs in the family, 
this fight must be constant 
ami vigorous. 

Yon must strike the dis- 
ease, or it will strike you. 

At the very first sign o\ 
tailing health take Scott's 
Emulsion of Cod-liver Oil 
with Hypophosphites. 

It gives the body power to 
resist the germs of consump- 

jII a^M Ss S m 

,\ now si. Caw 



ANNUAL MEETING. 
1 Mining c. 11 r«"v, 
annual meeting ot iho stockholders ol ibe Bull on Mining 
Is- hold ;u the ol ., nirmr. ivini 11. 33 

IHI >\Y OK .UNI \ :•. 

v . tor iho pni 

and the trans eh other husi 

Swe the mealing Tntssfw :oseen 

luosday, Jauuary nth at 3o'o1ook v m 

K K ORAYSON S t elarj. 
Sao Francisco, cat. 



January 8, 1898. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



'9 



preserve of the conspirators on PetaHima Creek Tom 
accepted and was escorted to the scene of the forthcoming 
carnage two works airo. His hosts told him that they had 
provided a skiff forhis soleoccupancy, and the Wharfinger 
blithely pushed off. 

Now, Casey is stout and ponderous and the skiff was ;i 
fragile affair, even when it was first built many years 
ago. Age had started its seams, anil just as Tom re 
that his boat was leaking badly, a thick fog came up 
and completely enveloped him. Casey had shot only one 
biid. and he had hardly time to examine it. so busy was 
he bailing out his leaking craft. Then he lost his oars, 
which floated away, and Casey was in a desperate plight, 
— in a sinking boat, enveloped by a fog. without oars, and 
half frozen. He would have given his political job for a 
good drink! 

When his tormentors finally rescued him and towed him 
ashore, he begged piteously for some whiskey, as he told 
his story of his deplorable adventure. 

" Why your own flask is sticking out of your pocket," 
said one. 

Tom sheepishly drew out the forgotten liquor. Then to 
change the subject he asked the boy to get the canvas- 
back he had shot. 

"Canvasback!" said the boy in derison. "That's a mud 
hen!" 

# * * 

One of the most popular men in local banking circles, 
and a rising young financier with an admitted future, is 
John Dempster McKee, cashier of the Tallant Banking 
Company. He is fond of a good story, and tells the fol- 
lowing one about himself: 

When he was a boy his tendency to stutter was a severe 
affliction to Dempster, but he has since then lost his sensi- 
tiveness, although his speech has not been greatly im- 
proved. Not long ago he engaged a new stenographer, 
who was anxious to succeed, and nervously desirous of 
pleasing her employer. It was her first situation. 

After he had summoned her to receive her first dicta- 
>ion, Mr. McKee noticed that his stenographer was some- 
what perturbed. 

"It's q-quite easy," said the cashier, kindly. "Just 
t-take it d-d-down the w-way I s-say it." 

"Oh, Mr. McKee," exclaimed the poor Hitle type-writer, 
more nervous trail ever, picturing to herself a letter full 
of dashes and disjointed letters. "I am afraid I cuuld not 
take nil of it down!" 

* * * 

Nature's gifts to Downey Harvey have not been alto- 
gether harmonious. His breadth is more noticeable than 
his height, and his shoulders are those of a giant. He 
affects the bicycle to a degree that amounts to a passion, 
and when mounted on his wheel bis most striking features 
are his well-developed legs. 

A female relative of the Harveys' — a very young lady, — 
is much interested in all that pertains to bicycling, and, 
one morning, watched intently the operation of blowing 
air into the pneumatic tires. Then she looked with un- 
affected admiration at his corpulent calves. Next she laid 
a small hand on Downey's golf stockings. 

"When did you blow these up?" asked the innocent little 
maideu. 

Call at Rosekrans& Co., No. 342 Sutter street, and inspect their 
"Crown Incandescent Gas Burner." This burner has no equal, giv- 
ing the naont li;?ht at the stniUest cost of any other gas-burner. 
These gentlemen supply mantles for all gas-burners. 

Ayrbs 1 Business Colleqe, 325 Montgomery. Individual instruction, 
shorthand, typewriting, bookkeeping, telegraphy; life scholarship, $30; 
low rateB per week and month; day; evening. Send for catalogue 

Huber's Del Monte Orchestra furnishes the best music for an c n- 
tertainmeut. Telephone; Care Benj. Curtaz, Main 1247. 

Fine Watch and Jewelry Repairing. Low prices. All work guaran- 
teed. J N Brlttan. watchmaker and jeweler, 20 Geary street. 




The 



Remington 

Standard Typewriter's 
New Models 

draw old friends closer and attract new 
ones, by the power of inherent merit and 
unfailing service. 

WYCKOFF. SEAMANS & BENEDICT 

211 Montgomery St., 
"■■■■^^^ S: n Francisco. ^^mmm 



ANNUAL MEETING 
Brunswick Con, Gold Mining Company, 
The annual meeting of the stockholders of the Brunswick Consoli 'ated 
Gold Mining Company will beheld at the office of the company, room 5fi, 
Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal., on 
THURSDAY, TBE 13th DAY OF JANUARY, 1898, 
at the hour of 11 o'clock a. m., for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors 
to seive for the ensuing year, and for the transaction of such other business 
as may come before the meeting. Transfer books will close on Friday, 
December 31, 1897, at 3 o'clock p m 

J. STADTFELT Jr., Secretary. 
Office: Room 50, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Pacific Auxiliary Fire Alarm Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Pacific Auxiliary 
Fire Alarm Company will b« held at the office of the company, room 309, 
Claus Sprecltels Building. Market and Third Sis., San Francisco, Cal . on 

TUESDAY, the 18th DAY OF JANUARY, 1898, 
at 11 o'clock a. m., for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve 
for the ensuing year and the tranaac ion of sich other business as may 
come before the meeting. W. HANSON, Feoretary. 

Office; Room 3i.9, Claus Sprecksls Building, Market and Third streets, 
San Francisco. Cal. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 
Sierra Nevada Silver Mining Company. 
The annual meeting of the stockholders of the Sierra Nevada Sil- 
ver Mining Company will be held at the office of the company, room 
14, Nevada Block, 3ij9 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal., on 

WEDNESDAY, the 19th DAY OF JANUARY. 1S98, 
at the hour of 1 o'clock p. m. , for the purpose of electing a Board of Direc- 
tors to serve for the ensuing year and the transaction of such other busi- 
ness as may come before the meeting. 
Transfer books will close on Monday, January 17, 1898. at 3 o'clock p. m. 

E. L. PARKER. Secretary. 
Office: Room 14, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery St., San Frauclsco, Cal. 

ANNUAL MEETING 

Spring Valley Water Works. 
The annual meeting of the stockholders of the Spring Valley Water 
Works will be held at the office of the company, No. 126 Stockton St., 
San Francisco, Cal., at 12 o'clock m , on 

WEDNESDAY, the 12th DAY OF JANUARY, 1898, 
to elect Trustees to serve for the ensuing year and for the transaction of 
such other business as may come before the meeticg, 

PELBAM W. AMES. Secretary. 
Office—No. 126 Stockton street, San Francisco, Cal. 

WANTED:— Several trustworthy gentlemen or ladies to travel in Cali- 
fornia for established, reliable house. Salary 8780 and expenses. 
Steady position. Enclose reference and self-addressed stamped envelope. 
The Dominion Company. Dept. 7, Chicago 111. 



F(00S Br\0S. 



27-37 Kearnu St. 



House Coats, 
Bath-Robes, 
Traveling Rugs, 
Shawls. 



Mackintoshes, 
Overcoats, 
Ulsters, 
Full-Dress Suits, 



Neckwear, 
Umbrellas, 
Hats, 
Gloves, etc. 



Boys and Children's Fine Glothincj a Specialty, 




SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 8 , 1898. 



HOW merrily the ball keeps rolling in the soiial world, 
and the present indications are that January will 
equal in festivity the month of December, which was full 
of gaieties of all kinds. 

The dance given by Mrs. W. F. Herrin last week was 
one of the prettiest of the season. The decorations were 
in excellent taste, and the dainty costumes of Society's 
buds and belles, nearly all of whom were present, made 
tbe srene remarkably attractive. The feature of the 
e\ening was the cotillion, which was led by Allan Wright 
wilh Miss Kate Salisbury as his partner, four figures of 
which were danced; an elaborate supper was served at 
midnight, after which dancing was resumed and kept up 
till a late hour. The guest of honor was Miss Annie 
Lnvreyof Colusa; and Mrs. Herrin was assisted in re- 
ceiving by Mrs. Monroe Salisbury, Mrs. Richard Bayne 
and Mrs. Avery Macarthy. 

The Friday Fortnightly Club merrily danced the old 
year out and the new year in, Miss Genevieve Goad lead- 
ing the cotillion alone most ably, and introducing four 
pretty figures. Several dinners were given previous to 
the dance, Miss Goad playing hostess at one of them, her 
guests beiug the Misses Salisbury, Edith McBean, Lillian 
Follis, Susie Blanding, R"mie Wallace and Miriam Moore, 
wih a corresponding number of beaux. The dance was 
attended by full ranks, who, as the old year expired, all 
united in sinning "Auld Lang Syne." 

Another New Year entertainment was the one given at 
Pioneer Hall by the members of the Society of Pioneers, 
when muMc. recitations and dancing served to pass the 
evening most pleasantly. 

New Year's Day was only a shade less perfect than 
Christmas, and, taking advantage of the beautiful weather, 
all of Society who could manage it went to Burlingame to 
witness the steeple-chase, after which there was a fox 
hunt, luncheon, etc. Those who remained in town, at 
least a goodly proportion of them, accepted the hospitality 
of the Century Club, where, between the hours of four and 
six, music, chat and light refreshments were enjoyed in 
the prettily decorated rooms. The Christmas dinner 
given at the Bohemian Club on New Year's Day was a 
jolly affair; and General Shafter kept open house for the 
officers of the Army at Port Mason. 

Society's entertainments this week have heen of a very 
diversified character. Mrs. J. G. James again appeared 
as a hostess after a retirement of many months, and gave 
an elaborate dinner on Monday evening at her home on 
Howard street. Her guests were Captain and Mrs. 
Freese, Mr. and Mrs. John Simpson, Mr. and Mrs. Cluin, 
Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Wilson, Mr. and Mrs. \V. T. Baggett, 
Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Berlin, Mrs. Crooks, Mr. and Mrs. 
George Cameron, Mr. and Mrs. Percy Beamish, Major 
and Mrs. Cluff, .Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Graves, and M. A. 
Djm. 

Society— with a big "S"— crowded the California The- 
atre on Monday night to witness the first production of the 
grand pageant of Columbia in aid of Charity. The whole 
play went without a hitch, and was most successful. 
Where all w.as so excellent it is hard to particularize, but 
p 's-ibly the scene introducing Friscilla. the Puritan 
Ma ; den. and John Alden, represented by Miss Florence 
Schultzand Sidney Starr: and the Peace Ball scene with 
its stately minuet, carried off the honors. On Tuesday 
afternoon Mrs. George Crux gave a tea at her Flat on 
Pine street; in the evening the Hop at the Presidio was, 
as usual, largely attended by our city belles. 

The ball at the Lloyd Tevises on Wednesday evening 
created a double interest, firstly that it was for the debut 
of the eldest granddaughter of the Tevis family, Miss 
Susie Blanding; secondly it was the first time in many 



years that that hospitable mansion had been thrown open 
for a dance. The entire house was canvased and beauti- 
fully decorated; the receiving party. Mrs. Tevis, Mrs. Wnl 
Tevis, Mrs. Gordon Blanding. Mrs. Salisbury, and others, 
occupying the bow window 1 f the large pari r to the left 
of entrance. The parlors and billiard to* m were given up 
to the dancers. A bounteous supper fully sustaining Mrs. 
Tevis's reputation in that line, was served at midnight. 
The guests were nearly all of the younger portion of 
society, so the festivities were prolonged until a late hour. 
The approaching Borel ball will her interesting 

occasion, for while magnificent dim ers have been and are 
of frequent occurrence at the Borel mansion, no ball has 
taken place within its portals since the famous one given 
by its former owner, Mr. Win. Barron, away hack iu the 
sixties, which was so handsome a function ibat it served 
as a theme for many a long day afterwards. Mrs. Borel's 
guests will be almost exclusively voung people, and the 
spacious billiard room will make a beautiful ball room. 

Last Thursday evening Mr. and Mrs. IToratio Stebbir.s 
held a reception iu the parlors of the Unitarian Church on 
Franklin street. Yesterday seemed to be especially 
popular with our entertainers: The winter Cotillion Club 
held a meeting at Lunt's hall: tbe Friday Night Club 
danced another of their cotillions at Native S ms' Hall 
under the leadership of Ed Greenway, who bad Miss Helen 
Hopkins as his partner. There were also several dinners. 

There are several affairs on the tapis for to-day of a 
similar character. Mrs. Oxnard gives a tea. and Mrs. 
Gordon Blanding will also give a tea. She will be assisted 
among others by her debutante daughter, Miss Susie; Mrs. 
and the Misses Salisbury, Mrs. Tevis, Miss Bessie Bowie, 
and nearly all the debutantes of the present season. 

This afternoon and evening the University Club will 
keep open house for the ladies of the members' families, 
and those who hold cards entitling them to the use of the 
Club. To-morrow Mrs. Max Davis and her daughters will 
give a tea at their residence on Pacific avenue. 

The presence in the Harbor of two British men-of-war 
— one of them a decided novelty — has been B feature of the 
week, several parties having been made up for its inspec- 
tion. Captain Fegan and his officers entertained several 
ladies at luncheon on board the Virage on Monday last. 

Weddings have not been so numerous this winter as dur- 
ing others past and gone, but the list of engagements an- 
nounced gives promise of many during the spring and 
early summer. Among the latest made known 10 the public 
is that of Miss Rumola Bigelow to S. A. Wood Jr., which 
is one of the announcements of the present week. 

One of the pleasantest affairs of Christmas was the din- 
ner and dance given by Mrs. Hooper at the Occidental 
Hotel. The dinner was charming; the new fad of suspend- 
ing lighted red Japanese lanterns from the chandeliers 
added to the effect of the decorations, which were of 
Christmas greens and red berries, and during the ufter- 
dinner hours of the evening the parlors were filled with 
a merry crowd who danced until supper, which was 
another feast; then there was another dance or two ere 
good nights were said. 

On next Wednesday the nuptials of Mrs. Henrietta 
Meyer and Mortimer Davis of Montreal will be celebrated 
at the residence of Mrs. A. Brown on California street, at 
which Rabbi Nieto will officiate. In spite of denials on all 
sides, even from the venerable groom himself, the Haggin 



When are you going to use Schilling's Best 
baking powder and tea ? 

Your money back if you don't like them. 



' 



s.\x FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Mishpil fact last 
at tl ■ Versailles, Kentucky. 

The I t,. divide their time be- 

ll Farm in Ken- 
tuck-. . hope they may 
be im nully occup; Ihe mansion onTaylor 

' which I a our milliooain 

h in i- ipty for ye 

The irity pageant and the To\ 

both taking j evening, the Terpsichor- 

eans< one their dance named for that night 

until later in the month. Next Monday night the Monday 
Evening Dancing Class will moot at Golden Gate Hall. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Grant have pone to Portland on a 
visit to Mrs Grant's family; Mr. and Mrs. Willy Babcock 
have sailed f ir Europe «iiii the intention of remaining 
abroad a year or so: Mrs. Eleanor Martin spent tie 
- in Washington City; Dr. and Mrs. 
Abrams were in Paris when last heard from; Mrs. J. L. 
Poole is back again in San Francisco, where she will re- 
main all winter: Mrs. James Freeborn is here from Paris 
to spend the holiday season with her mother and sisters, 
and Mr. and Mrs. Downey Harvey are expected home 
next week. 

Amont; the important social events scheduled for the 
early part of the New Year is Hie grand ball to be given 
by Ignatian Council No. ?,■>. Y. M. I., at Native Sons' 
Ha I, on Friday evening. February 4th. A very active 
Committee from the Council have the arrangements in 
charge, and they are sparing no effort or expense to make 
the affair the social success which it has always proved to 
be in past years. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Dickson and their daughter, Miss 
Ethel Scott Dickson, will give an "at home" to-day from 
5 until 7 o'clock, at their residence, northwest corner <f 
Haight and Baker streets. Mr. and Mrs. Dickson and 
their charming daughter have a wide circle of acquaint- 
ances in San Francisco's social life. This " at home " im- 
mediately precedes the departure of the family for perma- 
nent residence in New York City, where Mr. Dickson goes 
to assume the management of the Royal Exchange Insur- 
ance Company. Their departure from the city will be re- 
gretted by hosts of friends. 

The winter season only enhances the comfort and 
heightens the pleasure of living at Hotel Rafael. One has 
all the charm of the country and the social life and gaiety 
of the city at this popular resort of the swell set. Situated 
in an ideal spot, conducted on the most modern and yet 
unconventional lines, Hotel Rafael is a delightful home the 
year round, and finds constant appreciation in the large 
number of people who are its guests. 

On Friday evening at the rooms of the San Francisco 
Verein Miss Edith Esberg gave a large dinner party. 
The rooms were very tastily decorated and the young 
people were seated at small tables. Covers were laid for 
a hundred guests, who during the repast were delightfully 
entertained by music, one especial feature being the 
caricatures of several of the gentlemen present. Mr. and 
Mrs. Albert Rosenbaum, Mr. and Mrs. M. A. Gunst, Mr. 
and Mrs. Sigmund Stern were the chaperons. After the 
dinner dancing followed till a late hour. 

The Fifth festival of the Vested Choir Association of San 
Francisco and vicinity will be held in St. John's church, 
Oakland, on Wednesday evening, January 12th, com- 
mencing at 7:45 r. M. Admission to the church will be by 
ticket; but the doors will be thrown open to the general 
public on the commencement of the services. Tickets will 
be obtainable from the choirmasters and secretaries of 
the choirs participating the Sunday preceding the festival 
at the morning and evening services. The director of the 
festival is Mr. W. A. Sabin. F. R. C. O., choirmaster and 
organist of St. Luke's, San Francisco, director of the 
Synagogue Emanuel, and director of the Saturday Mornirg 
Orchestra, who is so well and favorably known to music 
lovers in this vicinity. The organist is Mr. G. Albrecht, 
choirmaster of Christ Church, Alumeda, who will be as- 
sisted, owing to the smallness of the instrument in St. 
John's, by an orchestra of twelve instruments drawn some- 
what from the Saturday Morning Orchestra. The chorus 




If a woman reads 



z»,S Pearlinc 'ads.' and acts upon 
them, she'll have 
plenty of time to r< ad 
everything else in the 
paper, That is what a 
woman writes to us, and 
she's a woman who otlghl 
to know, 1 tow large a 
part of your time i > spent 
in getting things clean? Haven't you some- 
thing better that you'd like to do if you had the 
time for it? Time is one of the things that 
Pearline saves. I'o hurry up housework and 
make every kind of washing and cleaning quick 
and easy, use Pearline. su 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 
Office of cne Hibernia Savings and Loan Society, corner Market, McAllis- 
ter, and Jones Ms., San Francisco, htcembi rS9, 1897. At a regular meetiDg 
of the Board of Directors of ibis Society, held this day, a dividend hasbeeD 
declared at the rate of ibjee mid thre -fouubs (330 per cent, per annum on 
all deposits lor the six mouths ending Derember 31, 1897, free from all 
taxes, and payable on and after Januaiy 1, 1898. 

ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savings and Loan Society. 

The Board of Directors declared a dividend for the 'erm ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1897. at the rate of four (4i per cent per annum on Term De- 
posits, and three and one-third (3'.i) per cent per annum on Ordirary De- 
posits, free of taxes, payable on and after Mooday. Juu>iry 3. 1P98. 

CYRUS W CARMANY, Uat-hier. 

Office: 101 Montgomery street, cor. Sutter. San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Security Savings Bank. 

Dividends on Term Deposits at the rate ff four (4) per cpnt per annum. 

and on Ordii ary Deposits at the rate of three and one-third (S^j) per cent 

per annum, free of taxes, for the half year ending Dec. 31, 1897, will be 

payable on and after Jamary 3, 1893. 

S L. ABBOT JR.. Secretary- 
Office : 232 Montg mery s treet, Mills Building. San Francisco 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

San Francisco Savings Union. 

For the half year ending D c. 31, 1897. a dividend has been declared at the 
rate per annum of four and two-ienths (4 2) per cent.onierm deposits and 
three and five-tenths i3 ft) percent, on ordinary deposits, free of taxes, 
payable on and after Monday, January 3, 1898. 

Office— 532 California street, cor. Webb LOVELL WHITE, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings and Loan Society. 

For the half year ending December 31, 1897, a dividend has been de- 
clared at the rate of four and twenty six hundredths (4 28-1-0) per cent per 
annum on Term Deposits, and three and fifty-hve hundredths (3 55-100) per 
cent per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free of taxes, payable on and after 
Monday- January 3, I8UK. GEO. TOURNY, Secretary. 

Office— 526 California street. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

For the half year ending December 31, 1897, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of four (4) percent, per annum on term deposits, »nd three and 
ooe-third (3M) per cent, per annum on ordinary deposits, free of taxes, 
payable on and after vionday. January 3, 1895. 

Office— 33 Post street, San Francisco, Cal. GEO. A. STORY, Cashier 

R. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL 
CREAM, OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER. 

Removes Tan, Pimples, Freckles, Moth 
Patches. Rash, and Skin Diseases, and 
every blemish on b> auty. and defies de 
•eciion It has stood the test of 48 years 
a id is so harmless we taste It to be sure 
. Is properly made Accept nocounttr- 
'elt of similar name. Dr. L. A Sayre 
said to a lady of the haut ton (a pa 
tient): As you ladies will use them, 1 
reco nmend 'Gouraud's Cream ' as the 
least harmful of all the Skin prepara- 
tions." For sale by a 1 Druggists and 
Kjincy Goods Dealers in the United 
-Hates, Canadas, and Europe. 

FJ5RD. T. HOPKINS, Prop'r, 

37 Grea t Jones St., N. Y. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 8, 1898. 



will number some one hundred and seventy voices, and will 
be composed of the choirs of St. John's and St. Luke's, 
San Francisco, St. John's, Oakland, St. Mark's, Berkeley, 
and Christ Church, Alameda. 

The San Francisco Verein celebrated the New Year by 
giving its members a burlesque on the recent Chinese suc- 
cess, Tin- First Burn. The Thirst Gum; as it is called, was 
given and excellently well acted. The original scenery 
was called into requisition, and under the efficient training 
of Messrs. Ackerman and Bryant the young men accomp- 
lished all that was expected of them, if not more. As the 
playwright adhered very closely to the original lines, the 
opportunity for burlesque was reduced to a minimum. To 
Mr. Dick SIoss, as well as Mr. Louis Greenbaum, fell the 
honors of the evening, both acting their parts very well 
and without any perceptible effort, while Clarence Walters' 
ballet dance caused no end of merriment, and was very 
funny in his entire act. A ball followed the play, the 
feature of which were the great number of very handsome 
gowns and pretty girls. Among the most prominent 
were Miss Rosalie Neustadter, Miss Minnie Schwabacher, 
Miss Amy Ehrman, Miss Nellie Joseph, Miss Alice Green- 
wald. and Mrs. Albert Rosenbauno. 

The New Years' Ball at the Concordia Club was quite 
the event of the season. It was preceded by the operetta 
Little I',., /',,]! — which was very prettily staged — hand- 
somely costumed and splendidly rendered. The chorus 
performed their part with unusual skill, and the principals 
divided the honors equally. Of the ladies. Miss Stella 
Schwabacher and Miss Hilda Rosrner handled the prin- 
cipal roles of Little Bo Peep and Miss Muffit with great 
success. The character of Richard Rattle, by Milton S. 
Bremer was well done, his singing and daucing being quite 
a feature of the play, — calling forth quite a number of 
encores. Simon L. Meininger and Miss Irma Rothchild 
had the "specialty" of the evening — the Mineral Water 
scene, from "The Girl from Paris"— in which "it is to 
laugh" — was duly appreciated from both before and be- 
hind the footlights. M. J. Sideman's Irish act was also 
good as were Julian Newbauer and Sam Jacobi in negro 
specialties. The Bon Bon sisters were the surprise of the 
evening and called forth several well-deserved encores. 
Their dances and songs were most artistically executed 
by Misses May Slessinger, Elsie Levy, Beatrice Sachs and 
Alice Baehman. whose magnificent gowns and large 
Gainsborough hats added effectively to the scene. A ball 
followed the supper and it was well into the New Year be- 
fore the party broke up. 

Thp engagement of Miss Cliffe H. Reed of Berkeley, 
daughter of ex-Judge Reed, to Mr. Max Brown has been 
announced. 

The engagement of Miss Olga Adelsdorfer to Mr. San- 
ford Goldstein, both of this city, is announced. The young 
lady is a petite blonde and extremely popular, while Mr. 
Goldstein is well known as a member of the firm of 
Fontana & Co. 

< >n Sunday Miss Mattie Davis will entertain her friends 
at a tea from 4 to 7 o'clock. 



Nickel Plate — West Shore Fitchburg Route. 
The popular low-rate short line between Chicago and Buffalo. New 
York, Boston, and other Kastern cities. Three elegantly-equipped, 
vestibuled trains daily; Wagner sleeping cars and Nickei Plate Din- 
InffCan. No change of cars Chicago to New York, or Chicaeo to 
Boston. For particulars, address B. F. Horner, G. P. andT. A., Cleve- 
land, O.; J. Y. Calahan. (i A. HI Adams street. Chicago, III., or 
Jay W. Adams, P. C. P. A , 37 Crocker Building San Francisco, Cal. 

Americans visiting Paris, writes the correspondent 

of the London daily Chronicle, will again be amused by a 
piece which has just been triumphantly read to the Gym- 
nase company, entitled Let Traniatlantiguea. The author, 
M. Abel Hermant, gives all the French impressions of "les 
Yankees," the chief character being a certain Jerry Shaw. 

Dukssmaking Parlous. PrloesKup. Perfect satisfaction. Mrs. M. 
B. Campbell, 714 McAllister St. Tt-lepbone. Stelner II 



Tbroat TROUBUfl To allay the Irritation that Induces coughir^ me 
" lln.'in'M Bronchial Troehi Le and safe remedy. 

Fine stationery, steel anu copperplate engraving. Cooper & Co.. 746 
Market street. San Francisco. 



CITY INDEX AND PURCHASER'S GUIDE 

RESTAURANTS. 
Bergez's Restaurant, Academy Building, 332-334 Pine street, below Mont- 
gomery. Rooms for ladies and families; private entrance. John Bergez 
Proprietor. 
Maison Tortoni, French Rotisserie, 111 O'Farrell street. Private dining 

rooms and banquet hall. S. Constantlni, Proprietor 
Poodle Oog Restaurant, S. E. cor Grant ave. and Bush st Private 

dining and banquet rooms, Tel. 429 A. B Blanco & B Brun 

Bay State Oyster House and Grill Room, 15 Stockton street and 109 
O'Farrel street. N. M. Adler prletor Telephone Main 5057. 

MEDICAL 
Dr. Hall, 14 McAllister St. . near Jones Diseases of women and children 

POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS. 
Hawaiian Stamps a specialty. MAKINS & CO 506 Market street. 
Selections on approval: any place in world. W. F. GREANY,827Brannan 
The W. H. Hollls Stamp Co., (Incorporated), 105 O'Farrell St., S. F. 

BOILER MAKERS. 
P. F. Dundon's San Francisco Iron Works. 314, 316, and 318 Main street 
Iron Work of every description designed and constructed. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Alta Silver Mining Company. 
Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, Cal. Location 
of works— Gold Hill, Gold Hill Mining District, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the third day of December, 1897, an assessment. No. 58. of Ten cents 
(in cis.) per share was levied upon the capital stock of Lhe corporation, 
payable Immediately in United States gold coin to the Secretary, at the 
office of the company, room 33, Nevada Block, 30i Montgomery street, San 
Francisco, Cal. 
Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
7th DAY OF JANUARY, 1898, 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction; and. unless 
payment Is made before, will be sold on FRIDAY, the 28th day of January, 
1898. to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of ad- 
vertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors 

J. E. JACOBUS. Sec etary. 
Ottice: Room 33, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Bullion Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco. California Lo 
cation of works— Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Ditectors. held 
onthel'th day of December 1897, an assessment. No .51, of Five cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of 
the company, room it, 331 Pine street, San Krancisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 

2l8t DAY OF JANUARY", 1898 
will be delinquent, and advertised for sale at public auction, ind unless 
payment is made before, will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the iSth day of 
February. 1898, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of 
advertising and expenses of sale. By order of tbr Hoard of Directors. 

R. R GRAYSON. Secretary. 
Office— Room U. 331 Pine street, San Francisco. Cal 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Challenge Con. Mining Company. 

Location of prtni ipal place of business— San Francisco, Cal. Location 
of works— Gold Bill. Nevada 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the itith day of Decembtr, 1897, an assessment. No C4, of Ten 
Cents (10 cents) per share was levied upon the capital stock of the 
corporation, payable immediately in United States cold coin to tte Sec- 
retary, at the office of the company, room US. third floor Mills building, 
N. E corner Bush arid Moniyt-mtry str et*, San Francisco. Cal 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid en the 
19th DAY OF JANUARY. 1888, 
will be delinquent, and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless 
payment is made before will he sold on Wednesday, the 9ih day of Feb- 
ua y, 1899, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of ad- 
vertising and exretses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

C. L. MciOY, Secretary. 

Office— Room 35. third floor Mills Building. N. E. corner Bush and Mont- 
gomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Savage Mining Company 
Location of principal place of business— San Francisco. Cal. Location of 
works-- Virginia Mining District. Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Trustees, held 
on I be 6th day of January, lh98. an assessment (No. 64) of Tw«nty Cents 

fier share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
rxmtdiaiely in United States gold coin lo the Secretary, at the office of the 
company, room 50, Nevada Blcck, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 
A ny stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
8th DAY OF FEBRUARY, L608, 
WiL i e delinquent, acd advertised for sale at public auction, and unless 
paj mentis m.de be fore will be sold on Monday, the 2Mb day of Fi bruary, 
I8B8, to pay the dtlirquent assessment, together with the costs of adver- 
tising and expenses of sale. 

EDWARD B. HOLMES, Sfcretary. 
Office— Room 50, Nevada Block. 309 Montgomery street. San Francisco, 
California 

ANNUAL MEETING. 
San Francisco Gas Light Company. 
The annual meeting of the stockholders of the San Francisco Gas Light 

uy will be held at the office of the company, 415 Post street at 

12 o'clock M. on TUESDAY, January 18, 1898 

W G. BARRETT, Secretary 
San Francisco, January 3. 1898. 



January S, 1898. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



23 




PARIS TRAP. Arranged tor Four Passengers. 

0. F. WILLEY COMPANY, ^SSES^ilS^ 

CARRIAGE BUILDERS AND DEALERS, 

31f. MONTGOMERY ST., (Nevada Block) 

Agency for Brewster & Co., of Broome St , New York; Michigan Buggy 
Co , Kalamazoo. Mich : C. S. Caffrey Co , Camden, New Jersey; A. N 
Parry &Co., Amesbury, Mass.; W. S. Frailer & Co., Chicago Road Cart; 
H. H Babcock Buggy Co. Watertown, N. Y ; New Haven Carriage Co., 
New Haven. Conn. 



Baooaae Notice. 



Baggage called for and delivered 
at trains, steamers, etc. Trunks 
35 cents. Baggage called for, 
weighed and checked at your 
Hotel or residence. Trunks 50c. 



PACIFIC TRANSFER CO., 20 Sutter St. 



San Francisco and North Pacific R'y Co. 



SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. Tibdron Ferry- Foot of Market Street. 
WEEK DAYS— 7:30, 9:00, 11:00 a m; 12:35,3:30 5:10, 6:30 pm. Thursdays- 
Extra trip at 11:30p m. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1 :50 and 11 :30 p m. 
SUNDAYS— 8:00,9:30, 11:00a m; 1:30. 3:30, 5:0U.6:20pm. 

SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FFANCISCO, 
WEEK DAYS— 6:10, 7:50,9:20, 11:10 am; 12:45, 3:40,5:10pm. Saturdays- 
Extra trips at 1 :55 and 6 :35 P M. 
SUNDAYS— 8:10, 9:40, 11:10 am; 1:40,3:40,5:00,6:25pm. 

Between San Francisco and Schuetzen Park, same schedule as above. 



LEAVE 


S. P. 


Id Effect Oct. 24, 1897 


Arrive in S. P. 


Week Days. 


Sundays. 


DESTINATION. 


Sundays 

10:40 am 
6:10pm 
7:35 pm 


Week Days 


7:30am 
3:30pm 

5:10 pm 


8:00AM 
9:3C)AM 
5:00pm 


Novato, 
Petaluma, 
Santa Rosa. 


8 :40 A m 
10:25 AM 
6:22 pm 




8:00 am 


Fulton. Windsor, 

Healdsburg, 

Geyserville. Cloverdale 








7:35pm 















7:30 AM 


I 8:00 am 1 


Hopland, Ukiah 


I 7:35 PM 


| 6:22 PM 


7:30a m 
3:30pm 


1 8:00 am I 


Guerneville. 


1 7:35PM 


10:25 A M 
6:22 P M 


7:30 am 
5:10pm 


1 8:O0AM 1 
1 5:00 pm 1 


Sonoma, 
Glen Ellen. 


I 10:40AM 
| 6:10PM 


8:40 A M 
6:22 P M 


7:30am 
3:30pm 


1 8:00 AM | 
| 5:00PM | 


Sevastopol. 


1 10:40AM 
| 7:35 PM 


10:25 A M 
6:22 P M 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West Springs ; at Geyserville 
for Skaggs' Springs; at Cloverdale for the Geysers ; at Hopland for High- 
land Springs, Kelseyville, Soda Bay, Lakeport, and Bartlett Springs; at 
TJkiah, for Vichy Springs, Saratoga Springs, Blue Lakes, Laurel Del 
Lake, Upper Lake, Porno, Potter Valley, John Day's, Riverside. Lter- 
ley's, Buoknell's Sashedoin Heights, Hullville, Booneville, Orr's Hot 
Springs, Mendocino City, Ft. Bragg. Westport, Usal. 

Saturday-to-Monday Round Trip Tickets atreduced rates. On Sundays, 
Round Trip Tickets to all points beyond San Rafael at half rates 

TICKET OFFICE— 650 Market St., Chronicle Building. 
A. W. FOSTER, Pres. & Gen. Manager. R. X. RYAN, Gen. Pass . Age nl 

Pacific Coast Steamship Co. 

Steamers leave Broadway Wharf. San Francisco for ports in Alaska. 
9 A. M., January 1. 6, 11, 16, 21, 26 31. and every 6th day thereafter. 

For British Columbia and Puget Sound ports, 9 A. M.. January 1, 
6, 11, 16, 21, 26, 31, and every 5th day thereafter. 

For Eureka (Humboldt Bay), Steamer " Pomona," 2 p. m., January 
1,5, 10, 14, 18, 22, 26, 31. February 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 25, 29. 

For Newport, (Los Angeles) and all way ports, 9 A. M.; January 1,5, 
9, 13, 19,21,25, 29 and every fourth day thereafter. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Port Harford Santa Barbara. Port Los 
Angeles, Redondo, (Los Angeles) 11 A. M., January 3,7,11,15, 17,23,27, 
31 , and every fourth day thereafter. 

For ports in Mexico, 10 A. H., January 6, and 2d of eaoh month thereafter. 
The company reserves the right to change, without previous notice, 
steamers, sailing dates, and hours of sailing . 
TICKET OFFICE— Palace Hotel, No. 4 New Montgomery street. 
GOODALL. PERKINS & CO., Gen. Agts., 10 Market St., San Francisco 



Southern Pacific Co. --Pacific System. 

Trains Leave and are Due to Arrive at SAN FRANCISCO: 
(Main Line. Fool of Market Street.) 



i*"i". I 



■>'.. > t. (897 



I Arrive 



•0:uu A 

7:UUA 
!:uu a 
7:00A 
7 :30 a 
8:00 a 
8:3ua 

•8:30 A 
9:00a 



9:00 a 
•COOP 
1:30 P 
2:00 P 
4:00 P 

4:00p 

4:30p 
4 SOP 



H5:3JP 

6:00 P 
6:00 p 
(8:00 p 
8:00 p 



Niles.San.li- stations 

Benlcfa Suisuo. and Sacramento 

Marysvllle, urovllle, and Redding, via Woodland 

Vin':L\,in: and Humae) 

Martinet san Kumon, Vallejo, Napa, Cahstoga, Santa Rosa 

Atlantic KxprOSb, Ofc'den and East 

Niles, San Jose. Stockton, lone, Sacramento, Marysvllle, 

Chico, Tehamn, and lied Ulufl 

Peters, MUiun, anil Oakdale 

New Orleans Express, Merced. Raymond. Fresno, Bakers- 
tk-ld, Santu Barbara. Los Angolcs, Demlng, El Paso, New 

Orleans, and East 

Vallejo, Martinez. Merced, and Fresno 

Sacramento Klver steamers 

Martinez and Way Stations 

Llvermore. Mendota, Hanford, and Visalia 

Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, Napa, Calistoga, El Verano 

and Santa Rosa. . 

Benicla, Vacaville, Woodland, Knight's Landing, Marys- 

ville. Oroville, and Sacramento 

Niles, Tracy. aDd Stockton 

Lathrop. Modesto, Merced, Berenda, Fresno, Mojave (for 

R.,ndsburg), Santa Barbara and Los Angeles 

Santa Fe Route. Atlantic Express, for Mojave and East 

'• Sunset Limited." Los Angeles, El Paso, Fort Worth, Lit- 
tle Roctt, St Louis. Chicago, and East 

European mail, Ogden and East 

Haywards, Niles and San Jose.. 

Vallejo 

Oregon Express, Sacramento, Marysvllle, Redding, Port- 
land, Puget Sound and East 



8:46 a 
10:46 A 
5:46 P 

8:15 r 
6:15 p 
8:46p 

4:15 p 
•7:15 p 



6:45 P 
12:15 P 
•9:00p 
7:45 p 
4:15 P 

9:15 A 

10:45 A 
7:15 P 

7:45 A 
6:45P 

!10:15A 
9:45 A 
7:45A 
t7:45P 

8:15A 



San Leandro and Haywards Local. (Foot of Market St.) 



t»6-00 Al 


Melhose, 


7:15 a 


8:00 A 


Seminary Park, 


(9:45 A 


9:00 A 


FITCHBDRG, 


10:45 A 


10:00 A 


ELMHDRST, 


11:45 A 


ill. 00 A 


San Leandro, 


12:45 P 


112:00 m 


South San Leandro, 


(1:45 p 


tl:00 P 


EST17DILLO, 


12:45 p 


i3:00 p 


Lorenzo, 


<4 :45 P 


4:00 p 


Cberry, 


'5:45 p 


5:00 p 


and 


6:15 P 


5:30 p 


HAYWARDS. 


7:46 P 


7:00 p 




8:45 P 


8:00 p 


t Runs through to Niles. 


9:45 P 


9:00 P 


t From Niles 


10:50 P 


ttll:15 P 




,tt 12:00 F 



Co ast Division (Narrow Gauge). (Foot of Market St.) 

8 :15 A Newark, Centerville. San Jose, Felton, Uoulder Creek, Santa 

Cruz and way stations 5 :50 p 

*2:15 p Newark, Centerville, San Jose. New Almaden, Felton, Boul- 
der Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal way stations *10,5ua 

4:15 p Newark, San Jose and Los Gatos 9:20> 

t'l:45P Hunters' Excursion, San Jose and Way Stations.... \1-S!Qy 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 

From San Francisco— Foot of Market street (Slip 8).— *7:15, 9:00, and 
11:00 a M . U:00. *2:UU. J8:00. *4:00, J5:00 and *6:00p. m. 

From Oakland— Foot of Broadway— *6:00,8:00, 10:00 A. M.; 112:00, *1:00, 
12:00. *3:00. 14:00 *5:0Qp. M. 

Coast division (Broad Gau ge) (Third and Town send streets). 

6:55 A 
9:00 a 

10:40 a 
11:30 A 
♦3:30 p 



:15t 
00 A 
:35A 



40 A 
:00A 
45 A 



San Jose and way stations (New Almaden Wednesdays only) 6: 
San Jose, Tres Pinos , Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove, Paso Robles 
San Luis Obispo, Guadalupe, Surf and prlncipalway stations 4 

San Jose and way stations *8 : 

San Jose and way stations , 8 

San Mateo, Redwood, Menlo Park, Santa Clara, San Jose, 
Gilroy. Hollister, Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, Pacific 

Grove *10 ; 

*3 ■ 15 p San Jose and Principal Way Stations *9 : 

*4:15 p San Jose and Priocipal Way Stations 9: 

*5:0(Jp San Jose and Principal Way Stations 1: 

5 :30 p San Jose and principal way stations 5;30 P 

6 :30 p San Jose and way stations 7 :30 p 

til :45p San Jose and way stations 7:30p 

a for Morning, p for Atternoon. *Sundays excepted. fSaturdays only. 

JSundays only . tt Monday , Thursday, and Saturday nights only . 

UMondays aDd Thursdays ^Wednesdays and Saturdays. 

The Pacific Transfer Company will call for and check baggage from 
hotels and residences. Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time Cards and 
other Informa tion. 

Occidental and Oriental Steamship Co. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Steamers leave wharf, FIRST AND BRAN NAN STREETS, atlFU., for 

YOKOHAMA AND HONGKONG, 

calling at *\.ube (Hio^o), Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting at 
Hongkong witto steamers for India, etc. No cargo received on board on 
day of sailing. 

Belgic (via Honolulu) . . Saturday, January 15, 1898 

Coptic Thursday, February 3, 1808 

Gaelic fvia Honolulu) Tuesday, February 23, 1898 

Doric (via Honolulu) Saturday, March 13, 1828 

Round Trip tickets at Reduced Rates. 

For freight or passage apply at Company's Office, No. 421 Market street, 
oorner First. _ D. D^STTJBBS, Secretary 

S. S. "Moana," Thursday, January 6, 18£8. 

S S "Australia", for Honolulu only, Tuesday 

January 25, 1898, at 2 P M. 

Line to Coolgardie, Australia, and Capetown 

South Africa. 

J. D. SPRECKELS&BROS CO., 
' Agents, 114 Montgomery St. Freight office, 123 
Market St., San Francisco, 




Steuinsliip^ 
@iipnw|- 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 8, 1898. 




HOME DECORATION- 

'&t r p?t'$'fii't'is*&& : ?iff wwt?ti 't'i' t "t" i "$*wit %r 

THE collection of curious picture frames strikes one as 
anew departure in artistic life; jet one lady, we 
learn, has been collecting these things for over forty \ 
Two rooms of ber house are entirely tilled with them. 
Some are made of birds' eggs, of feathers, of snake skins, 
of bone, of varnished potatoes, and of quartz. One deserv- 
ing of special mention contains 9.97(1 nails of various do- 
mestic jjn animals arranged in a fauciful design. 
When the Colorado beetle plague was prevalent, thousands 
of beetles were captured, and ingenious picture frames 
constructed with them. The Duke of Fife owns one of the 
most curious photograph frames in the world, which was 
made by Princess Louise of Wales out of her first Court 
train, to him three years before their en- 
gagement was officially announced. The palace of the 
Vatican at Rome is believed to contain the largest number 
of valuable frames in the world. The most costly frame 
ever made is in Milan Cathedral, and incloses the cele- 
brated picture of "The Virgin and Child/' 

Cornelius Vanderbilt did not change his smoking-room 
when he almost rebuilt his beautiful home. There was no 
need, for no improvement could be suggested. The tone 
of the room is Russian, and the draperies for windows, 
portien s are of silk and wool, beautifully 

wrought in red and blue in the well-known Russian cross 
stitch. There are pipes, tobacco jars, and every article 
known to modern smokers brought from Russia. In one 
corner of this quaint room is a samovar, and the hosi 
self frequently makes the coffee or tea, which he serves in 
exquisite cups of porcelain, set in a filigree saucer of gold, 
and having gold suodds enameled in colors to match. 

The decoration of bedrooms cannot be too simple, the 
principal thing being to select a paper that has an all- 
overish pattern that cannot be tortured into geometrical 
figures by the occupant of the chamber, who, especially in 
hours of sickness, is well-nigh driven to distraction by 
counting over and over again the dots and lines and dia- 
monds which dance with endless repetition before his ach- 
ing eyes. For the same reason it is well to avoid the use 
of light or bright colors, and especially to study harmony 
of effect, and to eschew contrast. 
The furnishings should also be soft 
and harmonious in color. 

A Japauese reception room, of 
rich and varied coloring is a feature 
of one of the best furnished households 
in San Francisco. The room is 
divided by a bamboo screen, the 
heavy uprights of which are lacquered 
brown, and decorated with conven- 
tional ornaments in dull gold. In 
front of the screen, in modern blue 
and white vases, are. on the one side, 
a dwarf pine tree, on the other a 
sheaf of cat tail-. The drapery fall- 
ing from a large Japanese mask over 
the opening in the screen is of thin 
Chinese silk, of a delicate celadon 
ibroidered in bright colors 
and gold. Fish n e 1 1 i n y may be used 
here if preferred. The stands on 
which the vases are set are of teak 
wood fancifully carved. Beyond the 
screen one sees a cushioned lounge, 
at the hack of which hangs 
another piece of embroidered dra- 
pery, the ground color of which is 
a pale sky blue. Over part of this 
hangs an old Buddhist kakemono 
painted on brownish silk and 
mounted with old brocades — per- 
haps the most costly single ob- 
ject in the room, as all good works of 
the sort are old, and therefore pre- 
cious. The rugs are modern Japan- 
ese. 



.^kk>o<><><>o<><>oo<><><x><>o<>o<><>o-<>ck><><>^ 

,ANDY CATHARTIC 



CURE CONSTIPATION 



50c. 



Constipation Afflicts 

part of the people all the time, 
all the people part of the time. 
Are you a chronic or occasional sufferer from constipation ? 1 
Do you want a sure, pure cure ? 

CASCARETS (eat 'em like candy) will stimulate ' 
your liver, regulate your bowels, leave your 1 
blood clean and rich, sweeten your breath and \ 
make your stomach do its work. 

CASCARETS kill disease germs, cure 

sick headache, taste good and do good, please ' 
the children, destroy and drive off worms and 1 
other parasites. 
-•-«-.-•-•« -«-«-♦-•-•-•-♦-•-•• ..»..•... »-.- • • • • * 

A toe box will prove their merit, and put you on 
the right road to perfect and permanent health. Try 

10c box to»day 1 If not pleased, get your money 
back. Larger boxes, 25c or 50c. 

ADDRESS 

Sterling Remedy Co. 

CHICAGO OR 
NEW YORK. =55 

5 OOOOOOOOOOOOO 0-CKX>0<H><><K><><><X><><>0<><><K><H><>0 

A large find of rare old blue ware, consisting of over 
250 pieces, was found in the mud at the bottom of the Dela- 
ware River during some dredging operations. It is a 
mystery how the crockery was lost in the river, as they 
were found under fifteen feet of mud. 

i isif „ l , glf8t „„ tlf . i „ 5 Wftti*iffer/^ 

We will give one hundred latest im i 

nes in even exchange for an equal number of the 

oldest sewing-machines of any make, now in family use. 

Awards to be decided from applicaiions sent to us before 

March 1, [898. The new machines will be 

red within thirty days thereafter. 



BOOKLET ANO 


-•&* lf^~^Bf^ 


SAMPLE 


RVSKS ^^* ' * ie 


FRFE 


KJMftjffl <->niy Genuine. 


FOR THE 


I Beware of 


ASKING 


^Baaiy imitations : 



Who has 
the. . 
Oldest 
5ewing= 
Machine? 



A new " Singer" 
given in 

exchange for it. 



All you have to do is to send this informa- 
tion on a postal card : (i) your name ; (2, 1 
location of your residence ; (3) post office 
address ; (4) name of your machine ; (5) its 
f;ict iry number ; (6) length of time in use ; 
(7) p^per in which y u saw this. Send 
1 7 this exact order on a postal card 

' send a Utter — and flit /:■ 

.'.;/ card but the information <;' 



This is no guessing contest requiring a 
payment, a subscription, or a personal 
service of any sort. If you own an old 
sewing-machine, you have only to send 
the requisite information in order to com- 
pete for a prize worth having. It costs 
absolutely nothing but a postal card, 

which may bring to your door the best sewing-machine 

in the world in exchange for your old n _. 



THE SINGER MANUFACTURING CO. 

P.O. Box 1814, New York City. 



Prict per Copy, 10 Cents. 



Annual Subscription, $4.00 








Vol. IV I. 



SAN FRANCISCO, JANUARY 15, 1898. 



Number 3: : 



Printed and Publithedecery Saturday by the proprietor, FRED HARRIOTT 
64 Keirny ttreet, San FranHti-.o. Entered at San Francisco Poet- 
ojtce at Second-clots Matter. 

TXt OjUe Of the NEWS LETTER in New Tort City is at Temple Court; 
and at Chicago, 90S Boyce Building, {Frank E Morrison, Eastern 
Repretentaiive) , where information may be obtained regarding subscrip- 
tion and advertising rates. 

ft PROMPT subscription to the Golden Jubilee fund is 
the duty of every man doiog business in this city. 
There should be nothing half-way about the celebration but 
its date. 

TO the disgrace of tl ose who control the appliances in 
this city for the incineration of human bodies, the Dur- 
rants found it necessary to ship the remains of their son to 
Southern California for burning. The cemeteries are 
measurably excusable for their refusal to sell enough earth 
to hide the murderer's body, for it is against their creeds and 
codes; but the crematories, that have neither faith to insult 
nor rules to violate, and that are consciencely commer- 
cial, have shown a contemptible regard for a supposed 
public opinion. Had not the Pasadena furnace yawned 
hospitably, the stricken parents might pitiably have been 
compelled to invoke the charitable covering of the ocean. 



THERE should be no difficulty in securing abundant 
means to make the Golden Jubilee a splendid success. 
Every man doing business in San Francisco will be directly 
and immediately benefited by the week's pageant. Hotels, 
restaurants, retailers of every kind and character, - will 
do more business because of the Jubilee; thousands Of 
visitors will throng the streets, and while sentiments of 
local and State pride demand generous contributions, 
the business side of the celebration appeals with even 
greater force to the people of the city. Every dollar 
subscribed will be returned many fold; trade will be 
stimulated, and a week's splendid entertainment for 
both strangers and residents will result. The commit- 
tees engaged in raising funds are crying out for money. 
Every business man who studies his own welfare should 
come promptly to their aid, and by his contribution dem- 
onstrate not only his State pride but his very pertinent 
desire to help himself. 



FASSENGER Agent Goodman says the Southern Pacific 
Railway is besieged with inquiries from the Middle 
States, asking what are the facilities offered by San Fran- 
cisco for direct passage from this city to Dyea. The rail- 
road people are unable to answer this question for the 
reason that there is at present no direct steam connection 
between here and Dyea. The nearest approach to it is 
the accommodations offered by the Pacific Coast Steam- 
ship Company, whose vessels touch at Seattle, Port 
Townsend and Victoria, en route to Alaska. This involves 
transfer at some point on the Sound, inconvenience and a 
vexatious delay, of which the miners will be notoriously 
impatient. It appears to the News Letter that some- 
thing should be done to carry people direct from San 
Francisco to Dyea, and that the fact of such certain ar- 
rangement should be extensively advertised at the East. 
All rail lines entering California would be glad to give 
these facts the widest and most effective announcement 
throughout their Eastern territory. The matter of direct 
lines to Dyea is vital to the spring trade of San Francisco. 
"Via Seattle" literally translated, means that the mining 
travel will go from Seattle via the steamships sailing out of 
this city. 



A CONSIDERABLE number of the unemployed have 
made a demand that they be given work. Their de- 
mands have the true ring about tbem. Eight hours of "toil 
and two dollars per day comprise their modest draft upon 
the city. These men sav that the sight of several hiin.dl'e'd 
hungry men in the Golden Jubilee parade would noj; ! im- 
press visitors favorably. This is true; but if these'. 'gen- 
tlemen, who are composed of about equal parts Of leisure 
and nerve, would consider for a moment that there are 
thousands of men occupying position's of respohsibility'm 
San Francisco who are very glad to work ten' hour§— fir 
even longer— every day for $2, and that, ther'e are other 
thousands who do not parade with the nnemplo'ye'd who 
would be thankful for the opportunity to laboY any n'uW- 
ber of hours their employers might suggest for$2 per'day, 
they will possibly regard their demands as being slightly 
unreasonable. Their rigid adherence to' the rigqts of 
American citizens should not be discouraged, but an 
empty stomach does hot rhyme very well with the plaint 
of unskilled labor for eight hours work and two dollars 
•pay. • ■ ■ ■-' . ' ; ; ,■' 

MERCHAiNTS doing business along Kearny street ba^e 
again appealed tO the; Supervisors in' vigorous pro- 
test against the delay's Of construction on the Halt of Jus- 
tice. It is amazing that such evident jugglery and trifling 
would be permitted. There appears to be no intentiou',pf 
finishing the work. Threats and entreaties are alike, un- 
availing. There is.abufidantlaw to protect the Kearny- 
street merchants and the taxpayers' from further loss. 
The city architect has power to take charge of the bully- 
ing and complete it upon a reasonable showing of neglect 
by the contractors. There' should be ho trouble in prov- 
ing the most disgraceful delays and wasteful negligence by 
Bateman .Brothers. Business is injured^ the public incon- 
venienced, and the city defrauded by the persistent delays 
on the Hall of. Justice. The Supervisors can, by a single 
ten-line resolution, simplify matters and end the trouble. 
Let them order the architect to go ahead and comptpte 
.the structure. How long would a business man permit 
such notorious disregard of his interests as has been shown 
in this case? Not an hour. The fact is that 'the contract- 
. ors have got the city by the throat and are squeezing it 
for every dollar that can be wrongfully shaken out Of the 
pockets of the people. 



THE anti-Scalping bill that is now before Congress has 
aroused a great deal of attention throughout' the 
country and has been indorsed by many boards of trade : of 
principal cities. More than four hundred newspapers'in 
the United States have taken up the matter r and are 
vigorously exposing the injustice and fraud that grows 
out of the operations of the scalpers. The National As- 
sociation of Merchants and travellers has pledged its 
members to wield their influence in favor of the bill, and 
the last meeting of the American Association of General 
Passenger Agents held, in St. Louis determined to main- 
tain a vigorous war upon the scalpers. In no other coun- 
try can such a disregard of honest business principles be 
found in operation under the eyes and with the sanction Of 
the laws. The sentiment of the public is justly opposed to 
the scalpers, who make! their money and conduct their 
business upon lines .that ■ are not countenanced in the 
mercantile world. ; Doubtless the great pressure and un- 
animous voice of the commercial bodies throughout the 
country and the palpablejiistice of the fight that is being 
made against the ticket scalper will result in his final 
suppression. ..,..,... .. : 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 15, 1898. 



AS TO OUR POLICE COURTS. 

THE judges of the police courts did not, the other day, 
stand by their guns. They made a well meaning at- 
tempt to disenthrall themselves from the often vengeful, 
and not infrequently corrupt grasp of the Police Depart- 
ment. They meant well, but fear of "the push," the 
power of the police in politics, and other things, made 
them weaklings who ventured to march up hill, but only 
to march back again. They set out to take back again 
into their own hands the control of their ovn courts. 
What was more proper or natural? If a court may not 
control its own proceedings what can it do? The Chief 
Justice assigns the cases before the Supreme Court, the 
presiding judge does the same thing for the Superior 
Courts, and why should the invariable rule be departed 
from in the case of the Police Courts? As well might the 
Supreme and Superior Courts be subjected to the control 
of the Sheriff. In the Police Courts there is the greater 
need of independence because there is the greater chance 
of the liberty of the citizen and the malice of authority 
coming into conflict. If all the truths in this connection 
could be told they would be enough to make high heaven 
weep. In practice the arresting officer, under the pre- 
sent system, assigr.s his own case. If it is to be squared 
for a consideration it is sent to a complacent judge, and 
in many cases, as the records will show, cases are not 
assigned at all, but are dropped for reasons that can be 
better understood than described. That this is the pre- 
sent practice can be proven by known facts that are be- 
yond the peradventure of a doubt. The attention of the 
Grand Jury might well be directed to this phase of a 
system that was not conceived in the public interest, and 
that has had more to do with police corruption, revenge, 
and failures of justice than all other causes combined. 

In answer to all this we are told that the Chief of Police 
is the executive officer of the Police Courts, and, as such 
their master. Bah. He is their creature, amenable to 
their censure and bound to obey their orders. After ar- 
rests are made, he is bound to obey their will, not his own. 
They are the responsible ministers of justice; he, for aught 
we know, may be a malignant and revengeful man, holding 
office only to get even with his enemies. It is their duty 
to protect the citizen, as well as the policeman, and to do 
justice to both. It is their duty, and it is necessary to 
public liberty, to watch for police wrong doings, and to 
censure, and, if need be, to punish them when they crop 
up, as they are daily doing in this city. In other places 
we know, police judges are constantly on the look out to 
do their duty in this regard. Yet in this fair city of ours 
we find the hands of the police on the throats of their 
judges, ready to throttle them into silence and subserv- 
iency, as may please their sweet wills. If this were really 
the intention of the law, as well might an arresting police- 
man be the judge, jury and executioner in any case which 
he might choose to trump up. The Bench is set up as a 
bulwark against the abuses towards which unchecked 
authority is always liable to lead. The change in the 
practice as to assigning cases ought to have been 
adopted. 

But an ill-informed public is referred to the law, and 
told that it confers upon the Police Department the power 
it claims. It is an idle pretense that ought to put to 
shame those who utter it. It is true that the Chief of 
Police is the "Executive officer" of the Police Judges, but 
what is an Executive? It is an authority that executes 
the will of those to whom it is subordinate, as the Presi- 
dent executes the will of Congress. That happens to be 
the clear terms of the law in this matter. Section 17 of 
the consolidation act reads as follows: — 

He (the Chief of Police) shall see that the lawful orders an 1 pro- 
cesses of the Police Judges' Court are promptly executed, and shall 
exercise such other powers connected with his office as head of 
police as may be prescribed in the general regulations adopted by 
the Board of Supervisors. * * 
Section 4, Supervisors' order 1603, reads : 
The Chief of Police shall cause to be made out and delivered to 
the Police Judge at or before 9 o'clock in the forenoon of every day, 
Sundays excepted, a transcript of all the entries made in the 
register of arrests since the last preceding report 

The very fact that the Chief of Police is to cause to be 
made out and delivered to the Police Judge at or before 



9 o'clock each day a transcript of all the entries made in 
the register of arrests, is proof conclusive as to where his 
duty begins and ends. One hcur is given the judge to as- 
sign cases, and he is to have a complete list, and not a 
partial one. He is to see that "the lawful orders and 
processes of the court are duly executed." It would be a 
lawful order for the presiding judge to assign cases; nay, 
more, it is unlawful for him to do otherwise. That is 
what he is made presiding judge for. There is more in 
this matter than meets the eye. 

The Reverend This is the title and name of a lead- 
William Rader. ing Divine — God save the mark!— of 
this city. He has more than once been 
conspicuously before the public, but seldom wisely or well. 
His course in the early days of the Overman Brown trials 
did not commend him to particular esteem. At the be- 
ginning, he had nothing but charity for the sins of an err- 
ing brother, guilty of adultery, perjurv and subornation of 
perjury whilst wearing the livery of Heaven to serve the 
devil in. With Brown down and out, and no longer a 
power, this man Rader is his bitterest enemy. We con- 
fess we liked not his pose in either capacity. Yet we dis- 
liked it not enough to have prepared us for his latest atti- 
tude. His statement to the public, published in the Ex- 
aminer on the morning after Durrant's execution, was of 
such a nature that we have yet to meet a man who does 
not speak of its contents with something like detestation 
and horror. If he had no charity for the dead who had ex- 
piated his wrong, he might at least have had mercy for the 
living parents who had done no evil. We believe his state- 
ment to be the intendment of a lie. It implies that Dur- 
rant confessed his guilt to him. When asked "if Durrant 
had confessed?" he gave an answer that implied an affirm- 
ative, but did not say it. He said: "I don't care to 
speak as to that." If Durrant never did confess to him, 
as he assuredly never did, why did be not say so like the 
truthful man and Christian gentleman that he assumes to 
be. His failure to do that entitles him to be called things 
that are not pretty, and that we do not care to print. 
He failed to give the condemned man religious teaching 
although invited so to do, and made no effort to bring him, 
to repentance. Having neglected Durrant in his life time, 
he might very well have left him alone in his death. This 
man claims to hold the commission of Christ to "preach 
the gospel to every creature" and "to bring sinners to 
repentance." To that end he is supposed to live, and for 
that purpose he is paid. Yet he avoided his duty, and not 
satisfied with that, sat upon the remains after death like 
a ghoul tearing them to pieces. He forgets that he too 
will have to meet the Great Unerring Judge some day and 
give an account of himself. May be he will then meet with 
that mercy he has meted out to others. We cannot help 
thinking that his co-religionists will regret that he gave 
to Father Lagan and the Catholic church the opportunity 
they so nobly availed themselves. He is a stench in the 
nostrils, whilst their Christ-like conduct is a sweet smell- 
ing flower that will long continue fresh in the memories of 
the people of this city and State. 

The Alaska Gold There can be no doubt that the com- 
Fieids. plete conquest of the Yukon regiou. 

within the next few years, by gold 
hunters, will be accomplished. The first season in that 
region has demonstrated the fact that, in the dead of 
winter, men can make their way from the Klondike region 
out to tide water overland, and so reach civilization. The 
natural conditions that prevail throughout that vast con- 
tinent of snow, and ice, and silence have already yielded to 
the determination and necessities of men. From the very 
heart of the mining districts, where, until the journey had 
actually been accomplished, it was thought that winter 
made travel or escape absolutely impossible, adventurous 
miners have safely brought word of the conditions that 
prevail there. The preparations that are being made to 
facilitate travel into that region, the railroads projected, 
stations that are to be established along the different 
routes, the trails that are to be built before the end of the 
present year: all these will contribute to the opening of 
that country, and will bring it into comparatively easy 
reach of San Francisco every month in the year. Nature's 
barriers will yield before the indomitable assault of the 




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January 15, 1898. 



SAX FRANCISCO NBWS LETT] R 



miner, as the snow and ice that lock the great Yukon 
basin melt before the summer's sun. In such a contest as 
this no obstacle, however great, can long delay the ad- 
vance of civilization and the search for gold. 

The reported discovery of the great mother Ioile. from 
which it is thought the gold found in the rich diggings 
about Dawson City and the adjoining streams originally 
came, if true, is the most important news that has been re- 
ceived from Alaska since the tirst announcement was made 
last July. There could be no doubt of the character of the 
formation in which the gold that has thus far been ob- 
tained, was found, that somewhere buried beneath the ac- 
cumulated vegetable matter lay the great true vein from 
which it alt was washed down by water or exposed by 
glacial action. The report of the finding of the mother 
lode is not unreasonable aside from the very circumstan- 
tial manner of its discovery. If this great gold-bearing 
reef be really found, it settles and fixes for a long time the 
important question of the durability and sufficiency of the 
Alaska mines, and justifies the belief frequently expressed 
of late that the Yukon basin was destined to become one 
of the permanent and greatest gold-yielding districts of 
which the world has any account. 

The Duty of There is no longer the least doubt that the 
the Hour. rush to Alaska in the spring will far ex- 
ceed any similar excitement of modern 
times. From every State in the Union come reports of 
deep interest in the Yukon mines, and of preparations to 
reach that land by the quickest and cheapest route. These 
thousands of gold hunters will bend every energy to get in 
first. Tkey will not want to waste time on the journey, 
and they want information before they start. For the 
most part their minds will be made up before they leave 
home, where their route to the far north will be definitely 
mapped out. It is of the utmost importance that San 
Francisco should furnish advance information to the in- 
tending miners. The merchants who carry the varied 
supplies that are necessary for prosecuting the search for 
gold in Alaska cannot expect to sit in their stores, and 
because this city is the metropolis of the Coast, have trade 
come to their doors. It is conceded that the number go- 
ing north will greatly exceed all early estimates. The 
prospective miner will bring money to exchange for sup- 
plies. His custom will be cold cash. Other points north 
of us are struggling to capture this business; they are 
lavishly yet wisely spending money to make money; and it 
is the only way to do it. The jobbers of the city must 
open their purses, and by every means at their command 
advertise throughout the East the fact that they are pre- 
pared to give the miners better bargains, better goods, 
and better accommodations than any other point on the 
Coast, if they would attract business. In this race enter- 
prise alone will tell. San Francisco can outfit every en- 
thusiast and save money for every miner who wants to 
hunt gold in Alaska, but if the fact is not made known it 
will be valueless. We may as well be off the map, so far 
as this rich commerce is concerned, if we do not act 
promptly and generously. What has been done — the few 
dollars already expended — have borne good fruit. Re- 
ports from the East are encouraging, but J.he Alaska 
Trade Committees are sadly cramped for funds. Come 
down with your subscriptions, jobbers of San Francisco, if 
you want the miners' trade. The longest pole knocks this 
golden persimmon. 

A Foul The news from Oklahoma is almost difficult of 
Blot. credence. We read of two Indians being roasted 
alive because of their complicity in the murder 
of a white woman in that fascinating country. Day after 
day we have been regaled with sensational stories of Cuban 
outrages by the sanguinary Spaniard, and we have groaned 
in spirit that such atrocities should be permitted. We 
have metaphorically foamed at the mouth, and we have 
long pointed with exultation over our supreme superiority 
over any other nation in the world. In truth, we have 
long exultingly explained to the barbarians born out of 
the land over which the stars and stripes float that im- 
planted in the heart of each American is a love of justice, 
truth, and honor. We simply do not take into account 
negro outrages; and if we do, we simply pass them over as 



playful exuberances of our national character. Hut «e 
have not arrived at the dignity of roasting people a'ive. 
The Indian is not a lovable creature; and when we 1 
to consider that he has not been always treated with con- 
sideration, and that man; a white family live unmolested 
in their midst, and that murders are surprisingly scarce. 
the Indian is not as great a rullian as he might be. It is 
well that this awful outrage should not be glossed over. 
If Indians had roasted two white men alive there would be 
a howl the like of which had never been heard before. It 
is to be hoped that swift and speedy justice be given the 
men who took part in a drama which is a disgrace to the 
American nation. 

The City's Gas. The Street Lights Commit tee of the 
Board of Supervisors, after having in- 
vestigated the charge that the gas in use in this city was 
dangerous because of an unwarranted infusion of carbon- 
monoxide, submitted the following report at the regular 
meeting on last Monday afternoon; 

To the Honorable Board of Supervisors of the City and County of San 
Francisco— Gentlemen : Your Committee on Street Lights, to whom 
was referred a resolution relative to the manufacture of gas and 
limiting the amount of carbon-monoxide in gas uHd for illuminat- 
ing purposes, would respectfully report that your committee held an 
investigation, which demonstrated that all gas, if inhaled, is poison- 
ous, whether manuffclured and known as coal gas or water gas; 
that water gap, so called, is supplanting what is known as coal gas 
principally because of its reduced cost and greater illuminating 
power. 

The quesiion of care is essential in the use of gas, and it certainly 
is not the function of this Board to attempt to regulate the manu- 
facture of gas when it is not disputed that all. large cities are engaged 
in its manufacture, and when it is tbown that water gas plants. are 
rapidly being introduced to supplant the works by which coal gas is 
manufactured, so that a higher illuminant can be produced. 

Your committee, therefore, recommend the indefinite postpone- 
ment of the resolution as being at variance with business enterprise, 
which is recognized as progressive in other cities, as in no rest eqt 
will that ga9 when used have disastrous results, if ordinary prudence 
is exercised in its use. 

The report was received without objection; but. upon 
motion of Supervisor Lachmann final action was postponed 
until this afternoon. The newspaper attacks upon. Ihe 
gas supply of the city are for the purpose of influencing 
the value of gas stock. This is a familiar method of de- 
pressing the value of securities in the interests of specu- 
lators and stock-jobbers, and has no reference to the true 
facts. That the injustice and falsity of these sensaijopal 
charges are clearly established may be found in the care- 
ful investigation of the Street Lights Committee, which 
will be, no doubt, endorsed by the Board of Supervisors at 
to-day's meeting. 

Tne Mercantile The appointment of Miss Ina 1 D, Gool- 
Library. brith to the office of Librarian of'thie 

Mercantile Library is a very deserved 
recognition of that lady's qualifications for the position'. 
Miss Coolbrith has had extended experience in library 
work, and will unquestionably fill the position ably. She 
is recognized as one of the most admirable writers of 
verse in this State, and enjoys a reputation as wide a's 
the country. Her appointment brings to mind the Mer- 
cantile Library, its heavy load of debts, and the rare 
value of its books; and it would appear that the present 
is a good time to develop some means of extricating the 
institution from its financial difficulties; The -Ladies' 
Auxiliary has done much to meet interest charges and 
keep the association afloat. A few of them are marking a 
gallant struggle against rather disheartening odds, %> 
save the institution from its original bad management and 
accumulating obligations. Here is a fine opportunity far 
some local capitalists link his name inseparably with a 
good deed by paying its debts and putting the library on 
a sound foundation. The institution can be made self-sup- 
porting by the wise expenditure of a comparatively small 
sum of money. Such assistance now, followed by good 
business management, would place the Mercantile Library 
in a position of absolute independence, and insure for it a 
perpetual career of usefulness. Here stands a great op- 
portunity; where is the public-spirited man of wealth in 
San Francisco who will avail himself of it? 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 15, 1898. 



The Troubles at Warden Hale is an honest, kind- 
San Quentin. hearted official, who has done what he 
could to put the Slate Prison at San 
Quentin on a sound running basis, and to keep it there. 
So far no scandals have smirched his terms of office, and 
the institution over which he presides has obtained a de- 
gree of public confidence that was previously denied to it. 
To say this is to say much. For years San Quentin was a 
fruitful source of troubles of one kind or another. Warden 
after warden came in, and left only an unsavory condition 
of matters behind. Warden Hale has served much longer 
than any of them, and has in all that time been accused of 
nothing more serious than undue kindness to his prisoners. 
At last, however, a cabal has been gotten up against him 
by a few of his subordinates, who are being unworthily 
backed up by a section of the press. We know Warden 
Hale and we know them. His word is worth more than 
their bonds. Tharp, of Louisiana fame, is Commissary of 
the prison, and the source of the press information. To 
make that statement is enough. No well-informed man in 
the State will hesitate in his opinions in regard to the two 
men. Strange to say, it is always in the Commissary's 
department that trouble breaks out. Have contracts for 
supplies anything to do with it? We do not wish to be 
understood as thinking that San Quentin is a model peni- 
tentiary, or that Mr. Hale is a perfect warden, but we 
do say he is the best the State has been able to find up to 
this time. It is to be devoutly hoped that the day is not 
far distant when California will adopt true penological 
principles in the management of her prisons. We are far 
from being up to date in such matters. 



Tho Salvation Army's The Salvation Army's colony ex- 
Co ony at Salinas. periment at Salinas has been 
fairly launched under as favorable 
conditions as could be reasonably desired. Its progress 
will be watched with interest, and a wide-spread hope will 
be entertained that it may prove entirely successful. 
Some families have already been placed on small farms ex- 
cellently well adapted to the growth of the sugar beet. 
At the beginning small advances will be made to those in 
need of them, but they will be charged for what they get, 
and will be expected to make repayment. They will not 
be paupers in receipt of charity, but honest, sturdy people, 
who only want a fair start in order to make life a success. 
With good soil specially adapted to the purpose to which 
it is to be put, means enough to plant it, and gather in 
the first crop, expert assistance to guide them as to the 
best methods, only strong arms and willing minds are re- 
quired of the colonists, in order to make the experiment 
an entire success. The officers of >he army are to be con- 
gratulated upon the progress they have attained with 
their scheme. They encountered, as was to have been ex- 
pected, many obstacles, but have skillfully surmounted 
them all. We confess to a soft side for the Salvationists, 
and because we like their methods of applying Christianity. 
Mere pulpit preaching is at best a poor substitute for the 
doings and deeds of the Master. He went about doing 
good, met the poor and lowly on the highways and byways, 
and, when they were hungry, fed them. When he had 
executive work to do, be chose humble fishermen to do it, 
and not rich pewholders. The Salvation Army is to be 
respected because it follows His example. 



Our New The startling announcement is made that 
Fortifications though this Government has expended 
$26,000,000 upon modern fortifications for 
the coasts, and to complete the scheme of defense will have 
to spend that much more, yet there are not enough artil- 
lerymen in the service to give, when all is ready, one gun- 
ner to each gun; nor are there enough men to assign more 
than two to take care of each gun, which cost the Govern- 
ment $1011,111111. In fact, if every soldier in our army were 
made an artilleryman, there would not be sufficient gun- 
ners to furnish one relief for the 1900 guns provided for in 
the coast defense plans. The plans for harbor defense is 
as follows: To group at 110 points in these harbors some 
500 high-power guns, 1000 twelve-inch mortars, and 360 
rapid-fire guns. There are 24 points, which will be provided 
with these new armaments this year, and according to an 



authority there are no troops ready for these fortifications, 
and it is further alleged that there are not men enough in 
the entire army toman the guns which will be mounted by 
the first few months of this year. This state of affairs 
looks somewhat serious, and it is more serious still when 
we come to consider that should all the forts around New 
York be suddenly completed, it would be found that if all 
the men belonging to the cavalry and infantry were con- 
verted into gunners, even then there would not be enough 
men to handle the ordnance. There have been several 
plans suggested to overcome this difficulty, but the fact 
stares us in the face that in the piping times of peace 
29,000 men are required to man the 1900 guns which are 
to be placed in the At'antic, Pacific, and Gulf fortifica- 
tions. It is urged that 7500 men will be enough to take 
care rf the guns in the new fortifications, which would 
mean 10 regiments of 12 batteries each; this means the 
doubling of the artillery, which is now five regiments 
strong. It will thus be seen why General Miles has sug- 
gested that there be an increase in the army. He argued, 
and perhaps not unwisely, ''first get the fortifications, 
and then, when it is realized that there are not enough 
men to take care of the guns, there will be no opposition 
to a proposed increase." Certainly his proposal to in- 
crease the army by two regiments of artillery is moderate 
when the above facts are borne in mind. 



Is Our Climate The climate of California is decidedly 
Changing? changing. Reports from the South 
speak of heavy snow storms. We read 
of San Bernardino, Redlands, and Riverside having all the 
way from three inches to five inches of snow, and the 
branches of orange trees breaking down beneath its 
weight. This is in the choice orange-growing section. It 
is certain that if the men who have planted those beauti- 
ful groves had ever thought of prospective snow falls, not 
a dollar would ever have been put in there. The town of 
Redlands, and there are few prettier in the State, has been 
built up by the rich tourist, who, falling in love with the 
location and the insidious stories told by the land sellers, 
purchased orange land under the assumption that the place 
was never affected by frost. Before cultivation, Riverside 
was actually as dry as the desert. Dew was almost 
unknown, and on account of this dryness it was much 
sought after by tourists troubled with pulmonary com- 
plaints, but the growth of trees and much vegetation has 
destroyed this, and Riverside cannot lay claim to the dis- 
tinction of being the best place in the United States for 
the consumptive. It is owing to this that the desert is 
now recommended, but again the few oases in the desert, 
which were at one time frostless and rainless, are also 
changing their character, owing to cultivation. If the 
South is year after year to be thus attacked by frost ard 
snow, their only industry will receive a blow from which it 
will in time be never able to recover. 




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January 15, 189S. 



SAN 1RANCISC0 NEWS LETTER 



SOCIALISM. 

Bv M. Gitmi Kipper. 

SOCIALISM is skim milk anarchy: the Infancy of sans 
culottism; a leaky old pirate, cruising among the 
galleons of wealth and tiring blank charges at each. I 
never saw a Socialist who believed in bomb-throwing, nor 
one who believed a convicted bomb-thrower had had a fair 
trial. Socialism lasts as long as an empty bead tries to 
611 an empty pocket. Expecting a man to be a Socialist 
after he is rich, is expecting a sick man to be an invalid 
after he is well. "Friend of the workingman" is the most 
mawkish of all our economic emetics. The cheapest form 
of philanthropy has always been telling a rich man how to 
help others. The Socialist proves his consistency by 
abusing the rich whose daughters marry lords; and, when 
he gets rich, buying some fourth-rate count for his own 
daughter. The French Revolution was one of those 
epochs in which equality said what it means. During that 
saturnalia of bell, that popular paradise of license, wealth 
was a crime, a gentleman an outlaw, a clean shirt a flag 
of truce unrecognized by the articles 0/ war. 

* * * # 

Half the Socialist's time is consumed in abusing govern- 
ment; t'other half in trying to prove that he isn't an 
anarchist. Nobody blames the poor man for his destitu- 
tion. We all know that poverty is a curse. Yet, to 
abuse a man for inherited wealth is as absurd as condemn- 
ing him for inherited health. It's difficult to be consistently 
crazy. The man who would capsize the government to 
right himself, would abolish hanging because ''hanging is 
demoralizing;" would discourage wealth because money 
"fosters selfishness. " He can't see that "selfishness" is 
the parent of enterprise. No man improves his property 
to assist the community. You may as well expect him to 
guard his health to prevent an epidemic. Yet private 
improvement of property is as much a factor in public 
wealth as personal sanitation is an essential to municipal 
health. 

* # * * 

As to our franchise, so rancorously assailed by these 
Utopians: The great fault lies in prostituting the fran- 
chise to those that hardly know a ballot-box from a spit- 
toon. A property qualification is an essential. Ignorant 
wealth is never so dangerous as educated poverty. An 
ignorant millionaire is rarely ignorant enough to start a 
riot. To intelligent pauperism belongs the honor of 
fomenting sedition. Where the treasure is the heart is 
apt to be. The man who opposes government wants to 
govern his neighbor. No disciple was ever satisfied with 
being as his master. One of man's deepest inspirations is 
his love of "bossing." The greater his ignorance, the 
more profound his statesmanship conviction. To learn 
finance go to the poor; to understand philanthropy, con- 
sult the pauper; for a lecture on industry, listen to the 
man supported by his wife. Theory grows as it increases 
its distance from practice. Theory is often the thoughtful 
parent of practice; oftener the shadow of another man's 
substance. "Siding with the gold bugs" doesn't neces- 
sarily argue a full pocket. It may suggest a respectable 
birth and a decent bringing up. Wealth may be no guar- 
antee of gentility. Nor may a competence be an evidence 
of rascality. Certainly the ability to pay your "wash 
lady" is as good a proof of worth as loafing about a cheap 
beer joint, haranguing a cohort of landless loafers on 
Henry George's land theory. When a man opposes gov- 
ernment he is a rascal. When he becomes good enough to 
live without government, he will be an angel. Eascals and 
angels are supernumeraries in our present social system. 
This is a world of compromises. Most of us persist in be- 
ing theoretical paragons. A few of us are content to be 
practical compromises. The moderate wine drinker is 
safer than either the drunkard or the Prohibitionist. Ex- 
tremes are apt to totter. Moderation has a deep top 
root. 

* * * * 

The masses are given to rooting into the dung-bill of the 
past. You can't convince the horny-handed Socialist that 
something may be old, even if he has just discovered it. 
You may as well try to convince a dog that digs up an old 
bone that he hasn't" found something fresh. The Socialist 



is a moden collecting scraps at the rich man's 

gate. The rich man's name is Adam Smith. The equality 
apostle can't Bee tin' difference between harvesting what 
he himself has planted and resurrecting what a better 
man has buried Every workingman is not a Socialist. 
Alas I every Socialisl is not a workingman. Reforming is 
a business in Itself; a business that Concerns every body's 
business but the reformer's. Your real reformer wastes 
no time on himself. He has reached that point where the 
public good is the very breath of his nostrils; and doing as 
he orders, their only escape from the house of bondage. 
His zeal in advising is somewhat mitigated by his wisdom 
in not following his own advice. 

* » * * 
Nobody claims that our government is perfect. States- 
manship is the fruit of evolution. There is nothing spas- 
modic in curing disease. Surgery is the last resort of 
professionals; the first resort of quacks. Assisting the 
patient to die to discover the cause of death, argues in- 
temperate zeal on the exact sciences. Mass rule has 
been the nightmare of Socialism since industry and econ- 
omy fixed a great gulf between wealth and poverty. Law, 
we are told, is a necessary evil. Making the turbulent 
behave themselves has always been legalized persecution. 
The necessary restraint which protects society will 
always be the target for blatherskites. There is no in- 
trinsic beauty about the gallows. Yet within the shadow 
of the scaffold abideth that peace which passeth all under- 
standing. There may be necessities which know no law. 
It should not be left to the flabbergasted fanatics of 
Socialism to define those necessities. 

* * # * 

Franklin, opposing "property qualification," asks:. "If 
a voter's qualification consists in a jackass, who votes, 
the man or the jackass?" The Doctor's question argues 
that length of ears should qualify the qualification. He 
seems, in the prodigality of his logic, to omit the bray. 
Did it occur to him that time might develop a voter whose 
brevity of ears and scarcity of legs might not cancel the 
bond of affinity between voter and qualification? 

It will make no difference whether the Japs and English combine 
to protect their interest in China, George T. Marsh & Co. at 625 
Market street, are showing a splendid and rare line of Japanese 
curios, carvings in ivory and rare materials— tapestries, etc. A 
visit to their store will repay one many times just as an object 
lesson. ■ 

Swell neckwear and fine furnishing goods for gentlemen at Car- 
many's, 25 Kearnystreet. 




VICI 



eather 
Dressing 



• la prepared In the largest leather factory In 
the world by the makers of Vlcl Kid— the 
most noted leather In the world. It gives a 
Bhoe a bright and lasting lustre, makes it soft 
and pliable, keeps It from cracking in wet 
and dry weather. The constant use of Vicl 
DreHningmeansa saving in shoe leather 
wbich the student of economy can'tover- 
look. Ask the dealer for It. An Illustrated 
book, telling how to care for shoes and In- 
crease their wear, mailed free. / - 
ROBERT H. FOERDEBEB, PhlUdelphU, ft. * 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 15, 1898. 



W '.;A> U> 13' < J ^M 1/ tg~ 




■L — 

J|^ i Cft n^HE combination of French wit and 
1 American humor results most hap- 
pily in The Man From Mexico, now playing 
at Jhe Baldwin, and a whole army of re- 
vivified French skeletons is suggested by 
its success. There are plenty of obsolete 
French farces, with plots too good to be forgotten, which 
would well sustain New Yorking by Mr. du Souchet. The 
original from which he contrived The Man From Mexico was 
adapted for the English stage longer ago than my theatri- 
cal memory extends, — so says the Chronicle critic, — but it 
is almost as necessary to adapt an English farce as a 
French one for American audiences. The French origin 
of the piece is pleasantly patent in its logical construction, 
— when you dispense with the naturalness of comedy the 
logical sequence of events becomes all the more impera- 
tive. It was the lack of logic which rendered My Friend 
From India, the other du Souchet farce, unamusing in 
spite of several isolated scenes which should have been 
funny enough. (I see that farce has lately been done into 
English with several important changes, under the title of 
My Friend the Prince). But if the ingenious intricacy of 
the plot of The Man From Mexico is obviously the work of 
a Frenchman, the humor of the dialogue is Mr. du 
Souchet's own, though his name is modestly absent from 
the programme, — "adapted from the French" is all that 
appears. It has the untangibility of the American joke. 
The American method is all different from the lour deforce. 
repartees of the English school, and the punning, — (politely 
called in the classics a "play on words") so dear to the 
heart of Mr. F. C. Burnand, the editor of Punch, and 
author and adapter of innumerable farces. 
* # * 

The Man From Mexico begins to be wildly funny as soon 
as "the man" appears, and remains so to the end. I 
never heard a piece played to such a continuous accom- 
paniment of laughter. But the climax of hilarity is the 
prison scene,— all of the prison scene. 

Benjamin Fitzhugh, a New York citizen of substance, is 
arrested one night for breaking the peace while partaking 
in a down- town frolic and has to serve thirty days in jail. 
He explains his absence to his wife by feigning a sudden 
journey to Mexico. She encourages him to go, as she has 
got into a similar scrape herself, and is anxious to get 
him out of the way. There is not much made of the wife's 
escapade, — probably more in the French original, but 
here it is only gently alluded to and mildly used as a mo- 
tive. The indecorum is all in the hypothesis; the results 
easily coincide with a man's idea of proper diversion for 
his female relations. To the prison, where Fitzhugh is 
wearing the regulation stripes and loaf and cannikin, 
come his wife and sister-in-law and the servant, on flower 
missions bent; they distribute nosegays among the con- 
victs. The complications of this second act are surpris- 
ingly intricate and clever, and all accounted for. In the 
general uproar at the fall of the curtain, when the prison 
bells are ringing and the absurd attempt to shoot the 
warden is made, there is scarcely a dry eye in the house. 
The third act is less amazing, but the interest is well sus- 
tained, and there is a refreshing unconventionally in the 
final explanations. 

# * * 

It is a one-part play for "the man," and so Mr. Willie 
Collier stands apart from the rest of the company as 
strikingly as Mr. Stevens towers above the kids at the 
Tivoli. Mr. Collier is a farce-comedian of the front rank, 
— a born one, no doubt, but also a trained one, — his detail 
is extraordinary and his methods strictly legitimate. As 
soon as an actor slips the leeitimate and plays the buffoon 
he ceases to be amusing. Farce is no more inconsequent 
than comedy, though many actors seem to suppose it is, 
; and think that when they cannot be natural they may as 
well be anything; — but then why not anything else just as 



well? And as soon as you think that, your interest is lost. 
There is no more latitude for the farceur than the come- 
dian; he has to convince you by the logic of what be does 
as much as the other by his naturalness. It is the irre- 
sponsibility of extravaganzas which makes them so dreary; 
they are only amusing as they approach or assume the 
legitimate forms. Benjamin Fitzhugh, as played by Mr. 
Collier, wouldn't exist, but he might. All the absurd bits 
of busiuess are rational; his whole performance is as funny 
as it well could be, — it is acting and art. Mr. Dan Mason 
does a clever bit of farce acting as the German with the 
tawny locks who also goes to jail. Besides Roderick 
Majors, the friend, played with much energy by Mr. Mac- 
lyn Arbuckle, and the wife, done in a businesslike way by 
Miss Louise Allen, the other parts are not extraordinary 
either in their possibilities or their fillings. 

The Man From Mexico is funny without being vulgar, 
the exact antithesis of A Night in New York at the 

California. 

* * * 

There have been several concerts this week. Foremost, 
of course, comes the Symphony at the Tivoli last Thursday 
afternoon. The performance of Tschaikowsky's sixth sym- 
phony, the "Pathetique" — sometimes called "the sui- 
cide, was an event of supreme importance, and the thea- 
tre was filled even fuller than at the three previous con- 
certs. Though the symphony and Mr. Scheel's splendid 
reading of it did not arouse anything like the deafeniug 
storm of applause they deserved, the audience rose for 
once to something almost li'ce enthusiasm. Dr. Dvorak 
said: " Tschaikowsky cannot write a symphony; he only 
makes suites." He disregards the unities and sequences of 
symphonic construction so rigidly observed by the classic 
composers. The tempo of the first movement changes 
seven times, and the second and third movements, both un- 
conventional and in allegro tempo, do not satisfy the for- 
malists, but it is difficult to approach Tschaikowsky alto- 
gether critically; his genius is so immense; his expression 
of the moods of the heart and the soul are so intense and 
vivid; he sweeps you away in a whirl of emotions. This 
music is exciting to the last degree; it is a profound psy- 
chological experience to hear this sixth symphony through. 
There is nothing so wildly emotional, except Wagner, — 
those crashes and wails, and scales that leap like fire, the 
gorgeous march tunes and dances, and the human heart 
throb through it all, prolonged alone at the last; you want 
to die to it,— if you are that kind. Mr. Scheel performed 
his difficult task gloriously; this is the sort of thing that 
Scheel understands. The broad effects and volume of 
sound which he drew from his limited orchestra were re- 
markable. Mr. Scheel is too ready to give encores; it was 
especially injudicious to repeat the third movement of the 
symphony. The prolonged applause is the natural outlet 
of feelings which have been wrought up to such a pitch 
that physical action of some kind is absolutely necessary; 
it does not mean that the movement is re-demanded. I 
should like to have heard the whole symphony over again 
immediately, but to repeat a single movement is to destroy 
the continuity of the effect intended by the composer. 
Grieg's " Im Herbst " overture was the first number on 
the programme. Schumann's "Abenlied " was placed 
second, but was played after the symphony, which was un- 
fortunate, — one could not recover in time to appreciate its 
quiet beauty. The four numbers from Rubinstein's "Bal 
Costume " mightily pleased that section of the audience 
which won't take its hats off, but, while not under-rating 
its proper value, it is tinsel after the other. I hope Mr. 
Scheel will play more of Tschaikowsky's music during the 
season; if not another of the symphonies or "The Pathe- 
tique" over again, at least the Hamlet or Romeo and Juliet 
overtures or the " Marche Slave." 
* * # 

Miss Villa Whitney White's song recitals are the most 
charming entertainments imaginable. It is hard to say 
which of the series of three is the most interesting, -I 
would not have missed one of them for the world, — though 
I incline to that in which Miss White speaks of the devel- 
opment of German Folk-song, and sings bewitching ditties 
to illustrate her words, as the completest example of her 
unique art. Though Miss White addresses her audiences 
as the particular students of song, there is not a moment 
of her pleasant discourse which does not vitally interest 



-^ 



January 15, 1898. 



SAN FRANCISCO NKWS I.RTTKR. 



tbe lay auditor. Not even the stoutest objector to in 
structive amusements could fail to be delighted, nor any 

ritb a spark of the pootic sense resist her charm. 
She has such a genuine affection for the folk-songs, and 
such a refined appreciation for their sentiment and humor, 
and speaks always with refreshing enthusiasm and sim- 
plicity. Her voice is well trained and of excellent timbre, 
and, in speaking, so attractive that it is as great a de- 
light to hear her read the translations of the little poems 

■ hear her sing the music. In the success of the 
" Schubert Evening " Mi>s Mary Dillingham had also a 
large share; her accompaniments are alvays rarely sym- 
pathetic. On Saturday afternoon Miss tVhite sang a 
cyclus of ten songs by Alexander von Felitz and several 
of the old folk-songs of the countries of the British Isles. 
Her delivery of the beautiful Welsh song, "All Thro' the 
Xight," — known to my youth as "Poor Mary Ann" — 
was especially impressive, and 1 have seldom heard any- 
thing so spirited and picturesque as her singing of "Char- 
lie is My Darling," — the song sentimentalists love to be- 
lieve that Flora Macdonald wrote. I hope Miss White 

will be induced to give some more recitals here. 

* * # 

Besides Miss White's recital on Friday afternoon and 
Herr Anton Schott's Wagner concert in the evening (too 
late to notice in this issue) there were the piano recital of 
M. Pierre Douiilet on Wednesday afternoon and the con- 
cert given by Miss Frances Davis on Tuesday evening, 
both at the Sherman Clay Hall. M. Douiilet succeeded 
best in the Rubinstein barcarolle and in the Liszt Taran- 
telle and also in some pretty compositions of his own. His 
reading of the appasionata sonata was not particularly 
interesting, especially with Scharwenka's fine perform- 
ance of it so freoh in tbe memory. He played the Chopin 
"Berceuse" with surprising delicacy, but the " Valse " 
was inarticulate 

Miss Frances Davis, the pupil of an imposing array of 
foreign teachers, made her debut before a small audience 
but did not succeed in creating a very favorable impres- 
sion in the two songs I heard her sing. She was assisted by 
Mrs. Carmichael-Carr and the Misses Heine. Miss Hulda 
Andersen, a pupil of Mrs. Carmichael-Carr, gave a bril- 
liant rendering of Moszkowski's Caprice Espanol and 

played a Grieg "Humoresque" as an encore. 

* * * 

The Alcazar stock company has been playing the over^ 
sentimental Esmeralda, a play by Frances Hodgson Bur- 
nett and William Gillette, during this week. The best per- 
formances were those of Miss Gertrude Foster, who did 
the most effective and natural comedy work I have seen 
her do, and Mr. Frederick Paulding, who played the part 
of Rogers. The old man is something of a bore before the 
end, but bis pathetic and wistful simplicity were delicately 
portrayed by Mr. Paulding. Next week the company 
will play A Man's Love, a one-act play by Mr. Frederick 
Paulding, followed by Dion Boucicault's farce, Forbidden 

Fruit. 

* * * 

There will be a grand production of Brian Boru at the 
Tivoli next Monday evening, This is a romantic Irish 
opera. The book is the work of Stanislaus Stange and the 
music is by Julian Edwards. There is a large cast, headed 
by Mr. Arthur Donaldson, who will make his first appear- 
ance here in the title role. The orchestra and chorus 
have been increased for the occasion. 

The Man From Mexico continues its successful career at 
the Baldwin through next week. The next production 
will be The Girl from Paris, which the press agent de- 
scribes as a piece of " sprightful gayety." 

At the California next week Rich and Harris's produc- 
tion of Courted into Court, a piece by John J. McNally, will 
be seen. Miss Marie Dressier is the star of the company. 

To-morrow the last performances of the spectacular 
ballet will be given at the Orpheum. There are five new 
turns announced for next week. 

Mr. H. J. Stewart will give a recital next Monday even- 
ing, January 19th, on the new organ now being erected in 
Trinity Church. Mr. Stewart has arranged an attractive 
programme, including works by Bach, Chopin, and Meyer- 
beer. 

Herr Anton Schott is giving six vocal recitals on Friday 
evenings at the Y. M. C. A. Auditorium Hall. 




fl Bottle 
Evans' flie 

CONTAINS : 
Richness of bouquet, 
Greamy Mead, 
Mellowness of Flavor, 
Amber-like Brilliancy, 
and pungent taste of the 
true bitter. 

vh^^Tfc Does not contain a partlclu 
VJKS. of sediment 

SHERWOOD 4 SHERWOOD. 

Pacific Coast Agents 
San Francisco, Portland, Los Angeles 



BIJ ' Tl 1 Frledlander,Gottlcb&Co.. 

3 Id Win I heat re- Lessees and Managers 

To-nlgbt, Sunday, and all next week Last performances. 
WILLIE COLLI BR, the quaintest of the qualm, In the season' s 
conedy success, 

THE MAN FROM MEXICO. 

Monday, January 27th— The Girl from Paris. 

n I TL J. FreA Belasco, Lessee. 

rAICaZar I heaXre. Mark Tball, Manager. PhoneMain254. 

Week of January 17th. Dion Boucicault's great fun provoker 
and roaring farce comedy, 

FORBIDDEN FRUIT. 

Popular prices, 15c, 25c, 35c 50c. res rved. 

Next— Anotter great Frohman play, THE RAJ AR. 

f\ i San Francisco's Greatest Music Hull O'Farrell 

\J r P i\6U m . street, between Stookton and Powells treets . 

Week commencing Monday, January 17, 1898. 

RIGE Z> ELMER. 

In "A Rube'a Visit to Chinatown." Professor Gallando, light- 
ning clay modeler; Knight Aston, tenor robusto; Carter Do 
Haven, juvenile singing comedian; Almont & Dumont, instru- 
mental uuetiists; Paulo & Dika, Barney & Russell, and Czita. 
Keturn fur one week only, Knaben-Kapelle, the forty little 
■ natural-born musicians. 

Reserved seats, *<!5c. ; balcony, 10c. ; opera chairs and box seats, 
.sue; Matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday. Matinee 
Prices: Parquet, any seat, 2ic; balcony, any seat, 10c. ; chil- 
dren, 10c, any part. 



Tivoli Opera House. 



MBS 



Ernestine Kbelino. ■ 
Proprietor and. Manager 



Last nights of our holiday spectacle, 
whirl of song, dance, and humor. 
Next week, the romantic comic opera, 



MOTHER GfOOSE.' A 



BRIAN BORU. , ; 

A story of Ireland many hundred.; years ago. Book by Stanis- 
laus Stange. Music by Julian Edwards. Great .cast, speoial 
scenery, correct costumes, appropriate accessories': ' 



Popular Prices. 



Howard Street, bet. Third and .fourth, 
Sap Franolscoi.' 



Old Union hall, 

Saturday evening, January 8, 1898. Grand opening of the 

FOOT CYCLING RINK. '.: 

Optioal illusion representing all nations. 
Positively first appearance In San Francisco. - 



THE PAPER 



on which the News Letter ; ■ . .,, ; 

is printed is supplied by . . 

fl. ZELLERBflGH & SONS, 

. PAPER DEALERS. 

416-418 420 Sansome street, n. e. cor. Commercial; 410421-123 Clay street; \ 
418-420 Commercial street, San Francisco.. Telephone Main U33. 

WANTED:"— Several trustworthy gentlemen or ladies to travel in Cali- 
fornia for established, reliable house. Salary $780 and expenses. ; 
Steady position. Enclose reference and self addressed stamped envelope. ; 
The Dominion Company, Dept. 7, Chicago, 111. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 15, 1898. 




THE latest of Charles Fijohjrfan's moral 
didactic productions is .'Paill Potter's 
play Tlu- Conquerors, played by the Empire Theatre Stock 
Company. This is probably the most prurient of all the 
nasty things which Manager Frohman has presented, and 
is in glaring contrast with John Drew is .4 Marr\mji- of 
Convenience, and Maud Adams in the Liill\ Minister. Potter, 
the dramatist, was once connected with the salacious 
Town Topics, in the early days when it was tabooed in de- 
cent society. The sensation in The ConcWroM turns upon 
an attempted assault upon the heroine,i who faints, and 
upon recovering believes that the villain liad accomplished 
his purpose. . To give him a chance t^ repeem his fruitless 
effort, another villain is made to attempt.a similar assault, 
villain No. 1 defends her honor, and the heroine promptly 
falls in love with the author of her first supposed ruin. 
How is that for a plot to catch the average lover of 
virtue? Potter declares that he wrote the play to catch 
the women, that they like such stuff, and Frobman en- 
dorses the sentiment by producing the indecency with all 
the accessories. It is a good thing that being a jay town 
San Francisco will escape Thr Conqueror*. 

# * * 

Mrs. Coleman Drayton, the heroine of a sensational 
domestic drama, has returned to New York, as a Mrs. 
Haig, and re-entered "society" under the auspices of her. 
mother. Mrs. Astor. Apparently she is warmly welcomed, 
for Mrs. Astor runs society and compels obedience to her 
edicts. Mr. Haig is in whiskey: that is to say he manu- 
factures that necessary luxury of the average citizen; but 
as the Astors were in trade long since, Mr. Haig's busi- 
ness is no bar and he sits at the table with the leaders of 
the ton. Mrs. Deacon, who had a somewhat similar ex- 
perience abroad, was not so cordially received recently 
when she made an attempt to re-enter the charmed circle; 
but she didn't have Mrs. Astor to back her claims. Her 
friends — the few who remain— declare that she is a much 
injured woman. She is spending the winter in Washing- 
ton with Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Baldwin. 

# * * 

The old doctors on the other side of the water are al- 
ways springing surprises on the easily impressed people 
on this side. First it is a real cure for consumption that 
doesn't cure, and now a learned physician declares that he 
has discovered one of nature's profoundest secrets, and 
fond parents who get boys when they want girls, and vice- 
rirsu, can have their desires filled by placing themselves, 
or rather the mother, under his care. It is simply a 
question of nutriment. A New York doctor replies that 
it is an open secret in the profession, that a plentiful 
supply of chocolate caramels will insure offspring of the 
female sex; and that a diet of lemon juice and vinegar will 
insure a cross specimen of the male sex. The newspapers 
are discussing the matter with a profundity of thought 
that speaks well for their medical education. 

* * # 

A very naughty masked ball was the ODe Manager Billy 
Brady opened the New Year with at Madison Square 
Garden. The scenes which occurred in the wine room be- 
little description, and the oldest of the tenderloin rounders 
fairly gasped with astonishment. But Brady made a nice 
dividend and several speeches; which we're loudly ap- 
plauded by his half-seas-o'er auditors. A California grass 
widow, fair to look upon in face and regally voluptuous as 
to figure, occupied the seat of-honor in the box of a lead- 
ing lawyer. The quantity of champagne she consumed 
during the evening was a matter of wondering comment, 
and people asked if consuming ability was one of the at- 
tributes of the glorious climate. Thefriends of the widow- 
declared that when she retired in the wee sma' hours. >he 
was "straight as a string. 

* # # 

An attempt is being made to introduce cheap Amcrii an- 
English opera is New York, and it looks as if it would be 
successful, now that the experiment of an American 



winter^ circus in one ring has proven a most lamentable 
failure' The West side American Theatre has been se- 
cured. It is large and roomy and even at 25, 50 and 75 
cents holds considerable money. II Trovatore is the 
latest attraction. If they would pattern after the San 
Francisco Tivoli in the matter of their selections for popu- 
lar approval they would do better; but the lovers of Eng- 
lish opera here are rather esthetic in their tastes and 
wouldn't like beer and smoke as musical accompaniments. 



The Civil Service Commission recently announced that 
they would hold special examinations for two important 
positions to fill existing vacancies — housekeeper and 
keeper of the morgue, and applications were numerous for 
both. The morgue candidates were examined in the three 
R's and merit and experience counted for something in the 
race for the ghastly prize. 

# * * 

Mrs. Leland Stanford and Miss Gertrude Stanford ar- 
rived at the Fifth Avenue last week and met Mr. Russell 
J. Wilson on a matter of important business connected 
with the Stanford estate. Mrs. Stanford was in excellent 
health and Mr. Wilson was certainly looking his best. 

Mm York, January 10, 1S9S. Entre Nous. 

If you cannot get beef, 
mutton will answer. 

You may choose between 
milk, water, coffee or tea. 
But there is no second choice 
for Scott's Emulsion. 

It is Scott's Emulsion or 
nothing. 

When you need the best 
cod-liver oil, the best hypo- 
phosphites, and the best 
glycerine, all combined in 
the best possible manner, 
vou have only one choice. 

It brings prompt results 
in all cases of wasting, or 
loss in weight. 

1 ; 50& and $1.00. 
SCOTT Si BOWNE, Chemists. New Y^rk. 



DR. BYROM W. MAINES 



14 Grant Avenue 
Rooms 16-17-18-19 



Dentist 



Dr. FRANK G. 



PAGUE, 

Dentist 



Has removed ois offlos to the Spring Valley Water Works Building, Geary 
and Stockton streets, southeast corner, S. F. Rooms 3, 5, and 7. 



DR. d. NICHOLS, 



(Formerly County Pbvsician of Amador County.) 
OfHce: z\ Powell street, corne. Powell and Ellis 



Baldwin Hotel, S. F. Hours: 1 to 4 p. m 



Residence, 
7 to 8 p. m. 



BREEN 



BROS. 



Coal Merchants 



Orders promptly Delivered. 



128 O'Farrell street, 
ror. Powell Dialers 
in wood and charcoal. 
Genuine Wellington 
CohI a specialty. 
Telephone Red 1581 



\A/ANTED— Several trustworthy gentlemen or ladles to travel InCall- 
vv fornia for established relia >le bouse. Salary 178) and expenses. 
Steady position ftocloite p ferenc and self-addressed stamped envelope. 
The Dominion Company Ucpt. 7, Chicago, ill. 



January 15, 1898. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




ONE of 
in soci 



the latest fads 
1 society, and quite 
a popular fad, too, owing to its beauteous cheapness, is 
the giving cf a dinner in the Italian quarter in an Italian 
restaurant for fifty cent* a head in return for a good din- 
ner at a club or swagger restaurant. It is declared to be 
so bohemian. don't you know, and the bohemianism consists 
of dirty table-cloth, dirty napkin, and food redolent of the 
savory garlic and swimming in oil. Saturday and Sunday 
nights are the favored evenings for this glimpse into al- 
leged bohemianism, and the truth of this bohemianism is 
proved from the classes that are to be found there. Only 
cheap sports — yclept in pure Californianese hoodlums, with 
their girl friends, attend, and the conversation is anything 
but chaste — which, of course, is given in tones loud enough 
to be overheard by anybody and everybody. The eating 
is poor, the service worse, and the society is disgusting, 
but then, it is something to say we have peeped into the 
life which is generally curtained from eyes that are sup- 
posed to see naught but what is pure, and ears that are 
supposed to hear nothing but what is polite. It is also 
said to be a fact that the chf who presides over these 
Italian confections, when he, wants to eat a well-cooked 
meal, abandons the stuff that comes from his kitchen and 
seeks an uptown restaurant. 

* * * 

It is rather pleasant, or rather profitable, to make your 
friends believe that you are a very general favorite at your 
club, and that when you propose a man for membership 
the name will go through without opposition. This is ex- 
ceedingly nice for the people who repose confidence in this 
popularity and then meet with failure — but it is sometimes 
a trifle too premature to present the man who says he can 
do these things with a gold watch and chain, and then find 
that his power was but a sham and a delusion, and that 
the mere fact of that man proposing your name is synony- 
mous with defeat. 

* * * 

There is a genial-minded young gentleman in town, son 
of an eminent lawyer who has a peculiar idea regarding 
the interest the young ladies of his acquaintance take in 
gruesome things. He once offered with great unction to 
a young lady a piece of wood from a club with which a mur- 
derer had done his deadly work, and was much chagrined 
that the present was spurned with a shudder. His sole 
distress lately has been his inability to procure a piece of 
the rope with which a famous criminal was recently 
hanged. It is his delight to produce these dismal tokens 
and dilate on them with great succinctness, and would at 
great length, only an unfeeling audience generally requests 

him "to shut up." 

* * * 

Mr. Tom Watson, who was most generally known as the 
" genial Tom," and since his marriage has been dubbed in 
addition "Lucky Tom," will start on a tour around the 
world to-day. Himself, his wife and daughter, Miss Anita, 
have been abroad for some time. They sail for Honolulu, 
and will then continue their journey to Yokohama. Their 
pilgrimage around the world will be of an indefinite 
duration, and will all depend upon the climate. There are 
few men in California who know so well how to enjoy life 

as does Tom Watson. 

* # * 

The British naval officers attached to the ships of H. B. 
M. which have been recently in port here, were among 
the most enthusiastic of the visitors to the Palace Hotel 
Grill Room, declaring that in no part of the world could a 
more perfect service be found in a public cafe, and the 
cuisine, said they, was equal to any in Paris or London. 

Eoyptian Henna. Safe, Sore, Pleasant, a vegetable hair dye for 
restoring gray hair to Its original oolor. Immediate etteot. Free from all 
objectionable qualities. At all druggists and hair dressers. Langley & 
Michaels Co., agents. .^___ 

"Cock o' the North ! " Watson's Scotch Whiskey. Sold by all 
first-class dealers. 



THE MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

OP TH» UN1TKD STATEH AM1T 
Awarded ttartr Inst OOfitrMl tM sherry 
to Agonm or MESSRS. 

Dun Gordon & Go. 



IN rtlEFEHENCF. TO AM. OTHER 
COMPKTITOHR. 

SOLD BY TttL LEADING WINE 
MERCHANTS AND GROCERS. 



Awarded Medal and Diploma Columbian Exposition, Chicago, IK'.I. 




CHARLES MEINECKE &. CO., 

Sole Agents Pacific Coast. 314 Sacramento St., S. F. 



Some papers . 
Print ... 
Some of the News 
Most of the Time. 
Most papers 
Print all the News 
Some of the time. 



THE GALL 



Prints ALL "HE NEWS 



All the Time. 



SUBSCRIPTION PRICE (InoJudin? Postage) : 

Daily Call (including Sunday/ 12 months, $8 1.0 

" " ■■ •• 6 " 3 03 

.• .. .. 3 .i 60 

i. .. .. j .. 65 

Sunday Call 12 " 160 

Weekly Call 12 " 1 51 

•' " ;. 6 " 75 

Sunday and Weekly Call 12 " 2 50 

Delivered by carrier every day, 650. per month. 



JOHN D. SPRE6KELS, 



Proprietor. 



UNITED STATES 
LAUNDRY. 



Telephone South 430, 



Office, 1004 Market Street . 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



BRUSHES 



For barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-bouses, bil- 
liard tables, brewers, book-binders, oandy-makers, 
oanners. dyers, flour-mills, foundries, laundries, 
paper-hangers, printers, painters, shoe factories, 
stablemen, tar-roofers, tanners tailors, etc ' 

BUCHANAN BROS., 

BRUSH MANUFACTURERS, 609 Sacramento St. ,S. F Tel. 5610. 



DR. CHRISTENSEN, Dentist, 



Has removed to 2720 Mission street, between Twenty- third and 
Twenty- fourth. Four specialists ixx attendance. 
Phone— Mission 160. 



k R. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL 
CREAM, OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER. 

Removes Tan, Pimples, Freokles, Moth 
Patches, Rash, and Skin Diseases, and 
every blemish on beauty, and defies de- 
tection It has stood the test of 48 years 
and is so harmless we taste It to be sure 
It is properly made Accept no counter- 
feit of similar name. Dr. L. A. Sayre 
said to a lady of the haut-ton (a pa- 
tient): As you ladles will use them, I 
recommend 'Gouraud's Cream' as the 
least harmful of all the Skin prepara- 
tions." For Bale by all Druggists and 
Fancy-Goods Dealers In the United 
States, Canadas, and Europe. 

FERD. T. HOPKINS, Prop'r, 

37 Great.Jones St., N. Y. 




A 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 15, 1898. 



IN THE PLflZA DE TOROS. 



THE walls of the city are plastered with big posters, 
this fiesta-day of San Andres, announcing: 

"To-day, in the evening, tbe-e will be a grand and most 
sumptuous performance in the great St. L izaro bull-ring. 
Six most brave and arrogant bulls are to meet their death 
at the skillful hands of the famous lighters, El Bote, El 
Gallo de Sevilla, and, as a special feature, the noted mata- 
dor, ' El Diablo,' is to handle both banderillos and sword, 
without picadores, in the fighting of two Spanish bulls. 
The spectacle is to take place at the hour of three." 

It is after three now, but " El Diablo" (otherwise Pepe 
Moreno), who is the principal figure in the fight, doesn't 
care a bit ! What if he is late — let them wait for him. 
Por Dins ! a man who has fought bulls for fifteen years, in 
three different countries, can afford to let people wait, and 
shout themselves hoarse for him! They'll like him all the 
better when be does come. And, thojgh "El Gallo" (who 
comes just before him has killed his bull in good style, and 
been applauded out of the ring, and the poor "toro" has 
been dragged out, too, by the six gaily decorated white 
mules, and the audience of eight thousand people are with 
one voice and one accord yelling for " El Matador ! Que 
venga el Matador I" that gentleman is seated on an up- 
turned box in the bull-fighters' private place, smoking a 
cigarette, and having the buckles on his low shoes attended 
to. Not until the latter suit his fastidious taste, and the 
former is smoked to the stub, does he regretfully rise and 
stroll through the matador's entrance to the ring. 

He is a great favorite with the people, and the moment 
they catch sight of him there is loud applause and hand- 
clapping, and the band changes from the danza to the 
beautiful "Matador's March," composed in honor of the 
" Diablo" himself, in Spain. 

Accustomed to such receptions, Pepe waits, motionless, 
with folded arms, and smiliDg, until the burst of applause 
is over, and the music stops. Then, throwing down his 
three-cornered hat, and bowing haughtily all around to 
the great crowd, he takes two banderillos from a ringman 
and m >ves over close to the wall, waiting for the bull. 
His bold eyes rove over the boxes, with their loads of 
beautifully-dressed women, all of whom gaze at him admir- 
ingly. As his eyes glance along, he gives a sudden start, 
for there — over in the "sol" — he could have sworn that 
he saw — Dolores ! And then he shakes himself angrily — 
what a baby he is becoming, in his old age ! Djlores — of 
course she is in Lisbon, where he left her seven years 
ago. Yes, seven — not so long after they had secretly, in 
the night, hidden the body of Joaquin, whom they had de- 
coyed and foully — Carajo .' What is he thinking about that 
for now ? now, when he has two bulls to fight, and when 
the first one is just to be turned in ! 

Pepe always fights in his own peculiar fashion, and al- 
ternates cloak-play with the banderillos. The horses he 
will not permit, holding that bull-fighting is an art, a 
science — not butchery. So no picadores are allowed, and 
twee are the banderillos put in, until the beautiful Anda- 
lusian bull is in a rage and passion of fury and agony that 
cannot be described ! The blood is running down in streams 
from where the banderillos have pierced and torn his neck 
and shoulders: the dust is blinding him: be is aching and 
quivering and stinging from the cruel thrusts of the sharp 
points as they twist and cut: before his blood and foam- 
covered eyes there is always the dancing, agile figure, in 
violet and gold and silver, that waves red cloths at him, 
and mocks him, and thrusts red-hot points into his flesh — 
he will get at it, and trample and grind it under foot ! And 
yet, furious, bellowing, pawing, and making great wild 
rushes, he is foiled each time — the slim, quick figure al- 
ways avoids the charge ! 

But the "Diablo" is getting short of breath, rather, for 
this is a very persistent bull, and he must not do any more 
humoring ! So he flings down the banderillos, and shouts 
for the sword. It is hastily pushed over to him from be- 
hind a barrier, and he has barely time to slip it in his satin 
cloak and dodge to one side, as the bull comes at him 
again with a loud bellow, and flinging out clods of earth in 
his fury. 

The bull must know what the sharp, gleaming blade is 



for, because he begins to charge sideways — never with full 
head and shoulders on, so that the matador can get the 
vital point ! So charge after charge is made by the bull, 
and skillfully avoided by the "Diablo," who is getting 
somewhat piqued, and altogether mad ! Never before in 
his life has he fought with the superb skill that he now 
displays — Oirrambnt! this "toro" rtquircs skill! The 
audience is wild with enthusiasm — from loud roars of ap- 
plause, and showers of purses and hats and flowers into 
the ring, they have passed into absolute silence, all on 
their feet, watching with breathless delight the magnifi- 
cent display of brute force against man's skill, of Spanish 
bull-fighter against Spanish bull. In truth, it is magnifi- 
cent. 

The bull is beginning to pant and tremble even more as 
he plunges at the matador: it is time to kill; because, if 
not, more play will exhaust the beast, and the killing will 
be less effective. So now for the death-thrust ! 

" El Diablo " places himself ready, and lifts the sword, 
just as the bull recovers from a rush forward and turns 
again to attack. On tiptoe, with sword raised, the mata- 
dor is ready: at that moment, like a lightning flash, comes 
the thought of the matador who had taught him, years 
ago, that tiptoe thrust, the most effective and graceful 
"kili" there is known ! Poor Joaquin ! The faintest glim- 
mer of remorse touches the man who killed him — brt be- 
fore he has time to think, the bull is close upon him, quiv- 
ering with rage, and all blood- covered. 

Quickly the matador leaps forward, his arm raised high, 
and the glittering point of his blade on an exact line with 
the vital point of the neck — he half closes his eyes to see 
better — yes, that will just do it ! It will be a pretty 
stroke ! 

Even as he smiles triumphantly with the thought, a 
voice is raised high above all noise of the ring — a voice 
that makes the matador quiver from head to feet, just as 
the bull, almost upon him, does — a voice, heavy with hate, 
and sweet with the Southern accent of Spain: 

"Dog of a murderer I Remember Joaquin ! " 

Paralyzed, unable to move, the matador stands helpless: 
before the people up above can even see that something is 
wrong, there is a sickening crunch, a horrible cry that no 
one present can ever forget: and the bull, at last trium- 
phant, is trampling and tearing a still, bloody mass of 
violet and silver and gold, that is now trickling all over 
with blood: men and women are cursing and fainting and 
weeping, but to no avail; for the matador "Diablo "has 
met hit death-thrust; he has gone now to settle bis accounts 
with the Judge even of bull-fighters, for the man he had 
murdered ! 

No one can locate the owner of the voice that had cried 
out : in the stir and excitement and terror she is for- 
gotten ! 

And while they are all screaming and cursing and jost- 
ling, and the bull is still tearing and pawing at the some- 
thing that bad been "El Diablo," a very dark and still 
beautiful woman over in the "sol," half hidden by a big 
pillar, looks down into the ring with a triumphant smile 
on her face, and hate and satisfied revenge in her Spanish 
eyes. It is Dolores ! — Gilbert Cunningham. 

Shake Into Your Shoes 

Al'en's Foot Ease, a Powder for the 
feet. It cures painful, swollen, smarting feet, and instantly takes the 
sting outof corns and bunions. It s the greatest comfort discovery of the 
ai?e. Allen's Foot-Ease makes tight fitting or new shoes feel easy. Ills 
a certain cu-e for sweating, callous, and hot, tired, aching feet. Try it 
to day Sold by all druggists and shoe stores. Bv mall fori.'>c. In stamps. 
Trial package FREE. Address, Allen S Olmsted, Le Roy. N Y. 

DR. dAS. G. GILBERTSON. Dentist. 

619 Market Street, third floor, room £, San Francisco 
Hours : 8 u-5, Acade my of Sciences Building. 

THE OPIUM AND MORPHINE HABIT. 

" What We May Do to be Saved" is a little book, 
giving full particulars of a reliable cure. Free, 
i »j J. i . Stephens, i>. pt. B., Lebanon, Ohio. 



has no shading; It has connective 
vowels and easy, flowing curves; it 
is simple, legible and fast as the 
fastest Full personal course, 425; 

by mail|»5; first-class references; descriptive " Sketch " free. 

ROSCOE L EAMES, Room 556 Parrott Building; telephone Jessie 1011 



yaht-Line Snorttiand 



January 15, i8yS 



SAN PRANCISCO NBWS LETTER. 



11 




■dCfct 



A WAYSI DE M EMORY. 

UKDKR the silver fringe? 
Of (he willow boughs that swung 
Agluierin the sunshine, 
A\ ith frozen jewels strung. 
With the smouldering fire of opals, 

Of pearls, and chrysoprase, 
And the twinkling diamond drops that set 
The frosty morn ablaze; 

I'oder the swaying willows, 
Where the tall green rushes sprang. 

The wayside spring of my childhood 
Bubbled and laughed and saug— 
Bubbled and rippled over, 

As the blithe winds Cime and went. 
And dimpled all day in the sunshine 
With a gurgle of glad content. 

Through a chink in a mossy bowlder 
Its living waters purled 

With inarticulate whispers 
Of the wonderful under-world; 
The tall ferns nodded wisely 

With every frond and feather— 
The brown reeds bent to listen, 

With all their heads together. 
Under the wintry starlight, 
And under the summer noon. 

Its ceaseless silver babbie 
Was set to the self-same tune. 
The rushes on its margin 

Were the greenest that ever grew — 
And moss and brake, for its sweet sake, 

Were golden through and through. 
When the skies were gray with tempest, 
And the landscape bleek and bare, 

It seemed like a joyous presence 
I n the midst of grief and care ; 
Like a cheery, happy nature 

No cloud can overcast, 
In joy or pain, in sun or rain, 

Contented to the last. 



BIRD OF LOVE. —olive custance, in opals. 



There is a garden in my soul, 

A garden full of singing birds, 

Their wings have never known control 
In any cage of words. 

They come from fairy lands afar, 

From lands of Dawn, and lands of Night, 
The mystic birds of fate they are: 

God only marks their (light. 
Their wings beat round my house of dreams, 

Beneath the eaves they build and sing, 
And always each one's coming seems 

A strange and sudden thing! 
And yesterday, ah I yesterday 

I flung a golden net of thought 
Across the tangled world that lay 

About me, and I caught 

A song-bird with a shining crest 

And plumage colored like a flame — 

A stranger, different from the rest 
I knew from whence he came. 

From that gray city, fair indeed 

To some, but foul to those, too wise, 

Who pass her sphinx-like smile, to read 
The secret in her eyes. 

And this bird sang a song that set 

My heart a-thriil with hope and powe". 

Earth's fruitless, feverish care and fret 
Fell from me in that hour. 

1 come again ! My soul is stirred— 
The praise and perfume of the Spring 

Is in thy voice, ! passionate bird 
Come back to me and sing I 



r 



l M IIMI^, ■I| W |IH M |I l M llW|» - 



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GET THE GENUINE ARTICLE I 

Walter Baker & Cols 

Breakfast 
Cocoa. 




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lie sure lhat the package 
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Brooklyn 
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Conducted on both the 

EUROPEAN AND 
AMERICAN PLAN. 

Bush Street, bet. Sansome and Montgomery, S. F 

This favorite hotel Is under the management of 
Charles Montgomery, and is as good, if not the best, Familv and Busi- 
ness Men's Hotel in San Francisco. Home comforts, cuisine unexcelled, 
flrst-class service and the highest standard of respectability guaranteed, 
Our rooms cannot be surpassed tor neatness and comfort. 

Board and room— Per day. $1.25, $1.50, 81.75, and $2; per week, $7 to $12; 
per month, $27.50 to $40; single room, 5uc. to f 1. 

47" Free coach to and from the hotel. 



Mel Bella Vista 

1001 Pine street 
A First-class Hotel 



The Bella Vista is the Pioneer 
First-class Family Hotel of 
San Francisco. Al> the com- 
forts of a modern residence. 

MRS. A. P. TRACY 



New York. 



Madison Square, Broadway and 23d 
Street. 



Under new management. Rooms single or 
en suite. Restaurant unsurpassed. Ele- 
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Reed & Roblee, Props. 
EUROPEAN PLAN. 



HOTEL 
BARTnOLDI 

New York 



Occidental Hotel. 



A quiet home, centrally looated, for 
those who appreciate comfort and 
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Wm B. hooper, Manager. 



San Francisco 



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WASHINGTON, D. C. 



THE HOTEL PAR EXCELLENCE" 

of the National Capital. First class In all 

appointments. 

An illustrated guide to Washington will he 

mailed free of oharge, upon receipt of two 

8- cent stamps. 

0. 0. STAPLES, Prop. 

WANTED:— Several trustworthy gentlemen or ladies to travel in Cali- 
fornia for established,, reliable house. Salary $780 and expenses. 
steady position Enclose reference and self-addressed stamped envelope. 
The LomlDlon Company, Dept. 7, Chicago, 111. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 15, 1898. 



<£tiBjfffluR£i/ r /E$ 



The editor of the Mining Investor, of 
A British Opinion of Colorado, in discussing a letter 
British Piomoteis. signed "Argonaut," dealing with 
English investments in America, 
says over his own signature in a London financial journal 
that, while agreeing with the writer in so far as his letter 
goesj he could but wish that he had carried his comment 
further, and placed the responsibility of non-success in 
the right quarter. " American mine promoters," he goes 
on to say, '" are viewed very much in the light of sharpers 
by Englishmen, and they are blamed for the failure of 
British investors. I, as a Britisher of many years' resi- 
dence in this western mining country, arise to protest 
against this grossly unfair verdict. I have the knowledge 
of what I say, and view the subject from an unprejudiced 
standpoint. There are probably many black sheep in the 
folds of both British and American promoters, but, as 
much as I regret to say it, I very much fear that there is 
a preponderance of the former, made worse by a display of 
arrogant stupidity." Mr. Sachs then reviews a number 
of Colorado, Montana, and Idaho failures, among them the 
Mineral Bill, and the Lucy Phillips, and Silver Mountain, 
alluded to by "Argonaut." The last-named mine was 
salted, but the fraud was detected and exposed by Mr. 
A. M. Womble, a mining engineer who was sent out to 
examine the property. " In the case of this Silver Moun- 
tain group," Mr. Sachs continues, " it is said that (after 
the property bad been floated) a mining engineer exposed 
the fraud. Why was such a mining engineer not employed 
before the property was floated ? Why is a good mining 
engineer not always employed by Englishmen before they 
invest their money in American mines. I think that the 
answer may be found in the statement that, in a majority 
of cases, a good engineer's report is not wanted, because 
the promoters are unscrupulous, and in other instances an 
engineer's opinion is not obtained because the purchasers 
are unbusinesslike fools. Let me conclude by saying that 
experience teaches me that the English expert who has 
been working exclusively in Africa and Australia is not 
always the best man to send out to examine an American 
property." The News Letter has been preaching the 
same doctrine for years past. The sharks in the British 
metropolis, of course, do not favor it. The latest exhibi- 
tion of their rapacity is the flotation of the Great North- 
ern Industrial Gold Company, with its 10,000,000 tons of 
$8 rock, offered as the bait for a $2,000,000 subscription, 
one-fourth of which would be a big price for the property 
involved. The developments in this case before long may 
result in placing the blame for overloading the issue on 
the right shoulders, for once in the history of mining pro- 
motion. In regard to this property, the prospectus is a 
tissue of gross exaggeration, which might be expected 
from men who do not even know how to figure up the 
acreage in the quartz claims mentioned. The only wonder 
is how any respectable person could permit his name to be 
linked with such grossly absurd statements. 

In the last issue of the Real Estate Circular, 
California Thomas Magee has a rather pointed article 
vs. Alaska, on the subject of mining in California. At- 
tention is directed to the fact that while the 
town can afford to send an expedition East to boom 
Alaska and the Northern territory in the hope of diverting 
trade this way, there seems to be a disposition to ignore 
the existence of the vast wealth in gold scattered all over 
California. Mr. Magee has visited the Klondike, and 
knowing whereof he speaks, expresses the opinion that 
nine-tenths of the people now figuring on emigrating this 
spring to Alaska could do far better by staying at home. 
It is safe to say that what he says wi'.l be borne out event- 
ually when the worn-out and disappointed horde of hungry 
fortune hunters turn their faces homeward a few months 
hence, poorer in pocket and wiser in experience. San 
Francisco has always made a poor hand at advertising 
home industry. If any evidence is desired of this, take 
the miserable little kennel of the Alaska Trade Exhibit at 
the ferry as a fair sample of up-to-date ingenuity of its 
kind. Possibly it is the best that can be done for the 



money, any balance of which on hand cou'.d be most profit- 
ably applied in carting the "Exhibit" into some more ob- 
scure corner, if such can be found. The science of boom- 
ing town and State seems best understood by the clique of 
salaried attaches which can always be found dragging at 
the sack provided by well-disposed citizens of means. The 
same old roust-abouts are always at the front, no matter 
what the proposition may be, prepared to keep the bellows 
going so long as there is a dollar in sight. The names of 
these cormorants connected with any public movement are 
sufficient to check the spirit of liberality among men of 
wealth, who would otherwise be free enough with their 
money. It is a pity that some means cannot be devised 
under the auspices of a new set of promoters, to take up 
and boom the mining interests of the State. It is ridicu- 
lous to see Californians striving to force outside localities 
to the front with such a wide field for lucrative enterprise 
at home. No mineral deposit ever yet discovered can vie 
with the "Mother lode" of California for regularity and 
permanence of its ore in depth, and it is our own fault 
that this has not been more fully and satisfactorily adver- 
tised. The chances, when all is said and done, are in favor 
of mines continuing at work and paying well along this 
great mineral belt, when the Klondike and its rival suc- 
cessors have dropped out of sight. Why not send a few 
sections of the Mother-lode on wheels all over the country, 
and let Alaska folks run their own show ? What Mr. 
Magee says in this respect is common sense. 

Since January 1st there are two sets 
Bogus Quotations of silver, lead, and copper quotations 
Made on Silver, issued daily for the guidance of out- 
side dealers, the Western Union hav- 
ing withdrawn in favor of the Gold and Stock Telegraph, 
which charges $20 a month for private information on the 
price of lead. Hardy & Harmon, brokers in a like manner, 
monopolize the right to quotations of silver, and Behr & 
Steiner, copper, at the suggestion of a committee repre- 
senting smelters and refiners. The Associated Press con- 
tinues to furnish the New York price of silver, which has 
been maintained one cent higher than the figures quoted 
by the brokers representing the combine. Some steps 
should be taken to choke off this combination, which is 
evidently intent on controlling the silver market by a self- 
assumed power to dictate prices as they are now doing in 
lead, to the injury of producers. The purchasing rate 
ought to be regulated solely by open market values and 
not at the will of buyers. A fair sample of what may be 
expected from these representatives of the trust was given 
by the first figures on silver they sent over the wire, quot- 
ing the metal down to 553 cents, when it was actually 
i l l ilii n, ■■ Hi m Tiali 11 1 "ifi* It will be safe to add a ceut 
to "their figures in t~be future, in order to get the market 
correctly. The Associated Press rate should be the sole 
euide in transactions, so long as these bogus figures are 
forthcoming. 

Business with the brokers on Pine street 
The Pine has come down to a point where it must 
Street Market, either change for the better or come to 
an end. The last not being likely, in 
view of the fact that the goose which lays the golden egg 
still remains to be plucked, it follows that an improve- 
ment will take place involving a higher range of values in 
the "goods." From this there appears another chance 
for people to make money, if they have nerve enough to 
buy in face of the present depression. It is seldom, how- 
ever, that any take advantage of a situation of the kind. 
Nine out of every ten of those who dabble in the pool of 
speculation reverse the more sensible order of proceedings 
by jumping in when prices get near the top, just about 
the time when they should be in position to take their 
profits and get out. The average percentage of fools 
runs the same on Pine street as it does elsewhere in the 
outside world, with its comparative ratio in the sum total 
of millionaires and paupers in the business. The turn of 
events from now onward for the next sixty days will be 
worth watching from an investor's standpoint. There are 
possibilities on the lodes which may fill, and if they do, the 
market will undoubtedly become attractive again for for- 
tune hunters who are at a loss just now how to act. 
Nothing new has come down from the mines of late to in- 
fluence any pronounced upward movement in the shares, 
but the situation is hopeful, nevertheless. 



January 15, 1898. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



n 




"Hear the Crier!" "What ibederll art tboa!" 
"Oneihat wlllplav ihedeTll.elr.wltb you." 

MRS. .John Martin is loose again. Several moons ago 
Mrs. Martin chartered a Japanese cook with a self- 
adjustable name and the bump of acquisitiveness abnor- 
mally developed. He began a foray iuto the lady's com- 
missary. Mrs. Martin covered the cook with a revolver 
and explored his pockets. The strain upon the cook's 
nervous system was unique. While he was "covered," he 
is said to have thrown up both hands. As an emetic Mrs. 
Martin's pistol is a success. The case was taken to court. 
The lady and the cook had the cook and the lady arrested. 
The case was dismissed. Mrs. Martin will appeal to Mayor 
Phelan. Mayor Phelan, we understand, will appeal to 
heaven. A city official once called upon Mrs. Martin, at 
her request. He entered by the front door, which was 
nothing strange. He departed via the back fence, which 
was less strange. His only waste of time was going 
through the fence rather than over it. He remarked 
since that he felt as if he was sitting on bullets. 

THE whiskey man and the morphine seller ought to 
shake hands over this announcement: There is a 
woman in this city who has come from one of the Eastern 
States to visit San Francisco, and who, according to the 
statement of her physician, consumed during the month 
of November nine gallons of whiskey and took twenty-seven 
grains of morphine a day. It is said by the experts that 
the morphine counteracts the effects of the whiskey and the 
whiskey the morphine — and yet there are medical men to 
be found who are ready to declare that neither, when 
taken with judgment, have any deleterious effect. This 
extraordinary woman is proclaimed to be enormously good 
looking and enjoying the best of health. So here is another 
illusion destroyed. 

A CERTAIN gallant Major, who studies for many hours 
military tactics between the lunch counter and the 
bar, was maneuvering with great difficulty toward a pier 
glass the other evening. The truth was, the Major was 
conveying a great load of commissariat, and the maneuvre 
was not attended with that military precision which de- 
notes the deportment of all officers at the Presidio when 
down town. The Major drew up before the glass, care- 
fully scanned his face, and then at the pink in his button- 
hole. "Why does he do that ? " asked somebody. "Ob," 
was the answer, "not till the Major's face gets as red as^ 
that pink does he stop laying in liquor." An hour later 
the desired scarlet was obtained, and the Major departed 
barrack ward. 

THE employees of the mint were much encheered by 
their Christmas announcement of a twenty per cent 
reduction in their salaries, and the murmurs that went 
up from that much-worked body would have wrung tears 
from the statue in front of the Lincoln school. However, 
no such body of laborers could sit or stand calmly under 
so severe a reduction, and the consequence is that the 
Superintendent of the Mint has left for Washington to try 
and make the proper authorities rescind the order. They 
are confident that justice will be done them though the 
heavens fall, and the old rate of salary be enforced. 

S^ORNEY Creswell is an advocate of facial symmetry. 
His Praxitylean passion for proportion has culmina- 
ted in a desire to lengthen Mr. Block's nose. Nasal exten- 
sion, 'tis true, may correct the brevity of the rudimentary 
probosces; yet sudden development should in this case, we 
hold, rest with Mr. Block's convenience, rather than with 
Creswell's classic zeal. Mr. Block's smeller may need an 
annex. Yet the proboscidian himself may prefer an or- 
gan whose functional worth may not be enhanced by spas- 
modic elongation. 

MRS. Frustruck is on trial for indulging in a constella- 
tion of honeymoons. She became entranced. Then 
she married. Then she untranced, and then did it all 
over again. During her attacks of soul coma, love was all 
powerful. A pair of breeches straddled each psychic 
lapse like a bifurcated nightmare. 



SAN FRANCISCO is rich in many blessings; somewhat 
of a Vanderbilt in various damnations. How often 
do we meet children whore neither of us should be'/ Boys 
of live years peddling matches, circulate through each 
artery of vice. There's something grotesquely suggestive 
in a diminutive phosphorescent Prometheus, saluting some 
boozy old sinner's nose with a sulphur tipped bouquet. 
Physical youth and physical contagion are akin. Are 
mental infancy and moral infection necessarily strangers? 
The Salvation Army has plucked enough of these kindling 
brands from the burning to rob hell of some of it« tem- 
perature. Yet the man of the world sees the want of 
municipal prevention to re-enforce religious cure. "Chil- 
dren are like arrows in thehandsof the mighty." "Blessed 
(or "cussed") is he that hath his quiver full." Have we 
an eight o'clock bell ? Is there no law against these 
financial microbes risking soul to save body ? 

THERE is a good story coming from Napa which is be- 
ing told up there with a good deal of gusto. A cer- 
tain naval gentleman who was spending some leisure in 
that classic town fell in with some good friends and sug- 
gested that they take a trip. Two carriages were hired 
and the party lauded the generosity of the naval hero. 
When nearing town he suddenly said "I have to take 
this train to Vallejo" and did so. When the two hacks 
were discharged the hack men insisted upon payment and 
great was the wrath against the naval hero. 

IF suicide is a sin, it must of necessity be a singe. The 
experiment is one in which the result is negatived by 
the modest reticence of the experimenter. Some of the 
greatest geniuses have committed suicide. A few of us 
still live. The cause of suicide rests with the taste of the 
suicider. We read of a woman who suicided because her 
son-in-law died. Our data is clouded in the vague fog of 
legend. Again we read of a man who graduated in immor- 
tality because his mother-in-law wouldn't die. Here statis- 
tics seem to assume a less apocryphal character. 

lWl RS. , of "Sorosis," is delivered of this: "Man talks 

II politics because he talks best of what he is ignorant. 
Women talk dress because they prefer to discuss the 
known." Now and then a flash of ignorance may be a re- 
lief to wearying wisdom. Is "Sorosis" an oasis of monot- 
onous familiarity in our Sahara of variegated stupidity? 
The unknown, as unknowable, offers a charm to him who 
will be heard for his much speaking. Woman, being less 
loquacious than man, has no incentive to speculate where 
the decision leaves her no wiser. 

CHIEF Lees says women are creatures of impulse. We 
know better. We have seen a woman consult two 
hours with a dry-goods clerk about a twenty-dollar pur- 
chase. Then buy five cents' worth of tape and order it 
"sent up." Does this "dreadful note of preparation" 
look like impulse ? When Chief Lees opposed the suicide 
theory in the Lamont- Williams case, he forfeited our con- 
fidence. To read his impulsive opinion on feminine impulse, 
one would think woman did nothing but jump at conclu- 
sions and talk about dress. 

THE anti-sidewalk lubricating ordinance should extend 
to banana skins. A man never shows what's in him 
till he steps on a banana skin. A banana skin never shows 
what's in it till it's stepped on. The poetry of motion is 
best leavened by the prose of discretion. Zeal in moving 
emphasized by enthusiasm in sitting down, detracts from 
that abandon peculiar to your true gentleman. 

WHEN the Examiner is boom-thirsty, it baptizes some- 
thing clean in dirty water; then re-purifies the apos- 
tate at public expense. The Examiner's stock phrase is 
"The People" — that threadbare and last resort of those 
that " fight" trusts and fool the trusting. " Enterprising 
journalism " is a tintinnabulating humbuggery which 
maketh the ear tired. 

THE anti-spit ordinance seems to be a success. The 
average American looks upon creation as an infinite, 
cuspidore. He rarely answers a deep question without 
spitting. When he looks wise, squirts at a remote fly, and 
clears his throat, expect a je suis Vetat — after-me-tbe-j 
deluge outburst. There seems to be an affinity between 
expectation and expectoration. Our sidewalks are unique, 
clean, and unpatriotic. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 15, 1898. 



BANKING. 



L 



Bank oi California, San FrancisGO. 

Capital and Surplus, $6,000,000 

WILLIAM ALVORD President l CHARLES R. BISHOP. Vice-Prest 

ALLEN M.CLAY Secretary THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

S. Prentiss Smith.. Ass't Cashier 1 1. F. Moulton 2d Ass't Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS. 
New York— Messrs. Laldlaw & Co.; the Bank of New York, N. B. A. 
Baltimore— The National Exchange Bank. Boston— The Tremont Na- 
tional Bank; Chicago— Illinois Trust and Savings Bank: Union National 
Bank. Philadelphia— National Bank of the Republic. St. Louis— Boat- 
man's Bank. Virginia City (Nev.)— Agency or The Bank of California 
London— Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & Sons; Paris— Messrs. de Roths- 
child Freres Berlin— Direction der Disconto Gesellschaft. China, 
Japan and East Indies— Chartered Bank of India. Australia and China 
Australia and New Zealand— The Union Bank of Australia, Ltd., and 
Bank of New Zealand. 
Letters of Credit Issued available In all parts of the world. 

California Sate Deposit and Trust Company. 

Cor. California and Montgomery Sts. 

Capital Fully Paid U ,000.000 

Transacts a general banking business 
and allows Interest on deposits payable on demand or after notice 

Acts as Executor, Administrator, and Trustee under wills or in any 
other trust capacity, Wills are drawn by the company's attorneys and 
are taken care of without charge. 

SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES to rent at prices from $5 per annum up- 
ward according to size, and valuables of all kinds are stored at low rates. 

Directors: J. D. Fry, Henry Williams, I. Q. Wlckersham. Jacob C. 
Johnson, James Treadwell, F. W. Lougee. Henry F. Fortmann, R B. Wal- 
lace. R. D. Fry, A. D. Sharon, and J Dalzell Brown. 

Officers: J. D Fry, President; Henry Williams. Vice-President; R. 
D Fry, Second Vice-President; J. Dalzell Brown, Secretary and Treas- 
urer; E E. Shotwell, Assistant Secretary ; Gunnison, Booth & Bartnett, 
Attorneys. 

London, Paris and American Bank, Limited. 

N.W. Cor. Saksoms it Sdttsr Sts. 

Subscribed Capital 12,600,000 

Paid Up Capital I2.uuu.uuu 

Reserve Fund I 850,000 

HiADOmci 40 Tbreadncedle Street, London, E. C 

AGENTS— Nbw York— Agency of the London, Paris, and American 
Bank Limited, No. 10 Wall Street, Nf. Y. Paris— Messrs. Lazard, Freres 
& Cle, 17 Boulevard Polssoolere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the 
world. Commercial and Travelers' Credits Issued. 

SIG. GREENEBAUM ) „.„..„. 
C. ALTSCHUL j Managers. 

GroGker-Woolworth National Bank of S. F. 

Corner Market, Montgomery, 

akd Post Streets. 

Paid-Dp Capital 11,000,000 

WM. H.CROCKER President 

W. E. BROWN Vice-President 

GEO. W.KLINE Casbler 

Directors— Chas. F. Crocker, E. B. Pond. Hy. J.Crocker, Geo. W. Scott 

The San FrancisGO National Bank, 

Southeast Corner of Pine and Sansome streets, S. F. 

Jas. K. Wilson, President. E, A. Bruguierb, Vice-President. 

Lewis I. Cowgill, Cashier. 

Capital . . $500,000 

Directors: Jas. K. Wilson, E J. Staples, Wm Pierce Johnson, Geo. 
A. Pope, E. A. Brugulere, Ed. G. Lukeus. Charles C. Judson. 

Agents: New York— Hanovi r National Bank, Chase National Bank; 
Boston— National Bank of tht Commonwealth. Philadelphia— Drezel & 
Co. Chicago— Continental National Bank. St. Louis— The Mechanics' 
Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London— Brown Shipley & 
Co. Paris— Morgan, Harjes & Ce. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

33 Post Street, below Kearnt, Mechanics' Institute Building. 
Guaranteed Capital 11,000,000 Pald-Up Capital 1300,000 

JAMES D. PHELAN. President. S. G. MURPHY, Vice-President. 
GEO. A. STORY. Cashier. JOHN A. HOOPER, Vice-President 

Directors— James D. Phelan, L. P. Drezler, John A. Hooper, C. G. 
Hooker, James Moffltt, S. G. Murphy, Frank J. Sullivan. Robert McElroy, 
and Joseph D. Grant. 

Interest paid on Deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order, Wells. Fargo & Co , or Exchange 
on City Banks. When opening accounts send slgnatuie. 

San Francisco Savings Union. 

Corner California and Webb Streets. 

Deposits. Dee. 31, 1806 934^02,327 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus l ,575.631 

ALBERT MILLER, President | E B POND, Vice-President 
Directors— Thomas Magee, G. W. Beaver, Philip Barth. Daniel E. Mar- 
tin, W. C. B. De Fremery. George C. Boardman, Robert Watt; Lovell 
White, Cashier. 

Receives Deposits, and Loans only on real estate security. Country 
remittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by check of reliable 
parties, payable In San Francisco, but the responsibility of this Savings 
Bank commences only with the actual receipt of the money. The signature 
of the depositor should accompany the first deposit. No charge is made for 
pass-book or entrance fee. Office hours— 0. a u. to 3 P. m. Saturday even- 
ings, 8:30 to 8 




IS 



The Story of Ah, a tale of the time of the cave-men, by Stanley 
Waterloo. Publiiheil by Way and Williams, Chicago, 1897. 
The first thing we notice about this volume is its effec- 
tive cover of black cloth, with yellow and red lettering, 
designed by Mr. Will H. Bradley. Beginning to read, we 
find that the contents well deserve their attractive outer 
dress. The scene of the story is laid in what is now the 
valley of the Thames, many thousands of years ago, and 
the tale begins with the birth of Ab, the son of One-Ear 
and Red-Spot. While yet a toddling infant, Ab came 
very near furnishing a meal for a hungry byena, but his 
father, One-Ear, came upon the scene in time to stun the 
beast with a blow of a club, and dispatch it with a stone- 
beaded axe. As Ab grew to boyhood, he formed a friend- 
ship with Oak, the youthful son of Stripe-Face, so named 
from the marks of a bear's claws upon bis cheek. Ab and 
Oak were vigorous lads, ever on the look-out for adventure 
and sport, one of their exploits being the capture of a 
young rhinoceros in a pitfall. But before the boys could 
get their prize, a cave-tiger, the most dangerous creature 
of those times, discovered the calf, and fought a fierce 
battle with the mother rhinoceros. The tiger was ulti- 
mately killed by some old hunters whom the boys summoned 
to their aid. Ab fell under the tuition of Old Mok, the 
cleverest weapon-maker of the day, and became skilled in 
the construction of axes, spears, and clubs, and later 
made the extremely valuable discovery of the bow and 
arrow. Oak and Ab were inseparable comrades till they 
both became enamored of Lightfoot, a girl of the shell 
people, who dwelt at no great distance from the cave-men. 
Maddened by jealousy Ab killed Oak, and buried him in 
the forest. Then he married Lightfoot, and settled down 
in a cave of his own. In his wanderings he discovered the 
Fire Country, and determined to settle there. But the 
Eastern Cave-men, under the leadership of Boarface, who 
was jealous of Ab's fame as a hunter and warrior, tried to 
wrest the region from Ab and his friends. After a 
terrific struggle, which is described with great vivacity, 
Ab's men, aided by their bows and arrows, gained the 
day. The surviving assailants were spared, and accepted 
Ab's authoritv. The whole story is told in so graphic and 
spirited a manner, that, remote as are the characters and 
the scenes, the reader never loses interest. There is 
plenty of good fighting of various sorts in the book : 
between Sabre- tooth (the cave- tiger) and the rhinoceros 
robbed of her calf, between the hunters and the herd of 
mammoths, and between the followersof Aband the East- 
ern cave-men. There is rough, simple lovemaking, too, and 
the element of pathos is found in the affection of Old Mok, 
the hunter and artificer, for Little Mok, Ab's eldest son, 
and in the child's sufferings and early death. Mr. Water- 
loo says in his preface that he does not think that so long 
a period intervened between the Paleolithic and Neo- 
lithic ages as most archaeologists suppose, and accordingly 
in "The Story of Ab" he has brought the two periods, 
that of the chipped, and that of the polished stone imple- 
ment, closer together than most scientific men put them. 
This, however, really helps the story, which is rendered 
more simple and continuous. But the tale of the cave- 
men's struggles, dangers, privations and j iys, is so 
straightforward and full of go that the reader will not 
need to concern himself about pre-historic theories: all 
he has to do. and all he will want to do, is to read right on. 
He will find himself in the hands of a skillful narrator. 

Beside Old Hearlh Stones, by Abram English Brown. Published bv 
Lee an.l Shepard, 10 Milk street. Boston. 1867. 
This book is one of the series entitled "Foot-prints of 
the Patriots," and may be taken as an evidence of the 
growing interest in matters of an antiquarian or historical 
sort. The author records visits paid by him to Peppereil, 
Shirley, Hollis, Danvers, Chelmsford, and other places 
closely connected with the history of the Revolutionary 
war. Mr. Brown visited in the most painstaking manner 



January 15, 1898. 



SAN FRAXCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



»5 



the descendants of all soldiers of the Revolutionary army 
that he could find record of, talked with them of their 
ancestors, and inspected tomb-stones, tablets, swords, 
cannon-balls, and other memorials. Pboto-engtavings of 
many of these relics are given, and also of old houses that 
played a part in the Btrugple. The narrative gives one 
an idea of the hardships, sufferings, and trials, undergone 
by the patriots, and of the courage and tenacity with 
which they fought. There are some interesting references 
to the German allies employed by England, and to the 
visit to America of the Baroness Riedesel, whose husband, 
MajorGeneral Riedesel. commanded the Brunswick army. 
The narrative, inevitably, is packed with details so minute 
that it is somewhat tedious to read continuously, but all 
whose forefathers took part in the War of Independence 
will find much interesting matter in the book. The print- 
ing is excellent, and the photo-engravings are good. 

The California Vegetables in Garden and Field, by Edward J. 

Wickson, A. M. Published by Tbe Pacific Rural Press, San 

Francisco, 1897. Price, two dollars. 
The sub-title of this book is "A manual of practice, with 
and without irrigation, for semi-tropical countries," and 
its author is Professor of Agricultural Practice in the 
University of California, and President of the California 
State Floral Society. Among the products of garden and 
field that are discussed are asparagus, celery, chicory, 
corn, melons, peppers, onions, spinach and radishes. 
There are also chapters on seed-growiDg, weeds, garden- 
protection, and vegetables for canning and drying. The 
book seems to contain a vast amount of information of 
value and interest to vegetable-growers, and is embellished 
with several full-page photo-engravings. Professor 
Wickson admits that Orientals and Southern Europeans 
have the control of vegetable-growing for the market, 
but sees no reason why Americans, by the use of improved 
methods of cultivation, should not be able to compete with 
them successfully. 

From The Dial we learn that Senator Perkins is about 
to introduce into the Senate a bill, requiring four copies 
(in addition to the two that have to be sent to the 
Librarian of Congress for the purpose of securing copy- 
right) of the best edition of any copyright book published 
in the United States to be sent to certain designated 
libraries at San Francisco, Denver, Chicago, and New 
Orleans. Tbe committee of Californian librarians having 
the plan in charge urge that "there is a wide-spread feel- 
ing that copies of copy- righted works should be available, 
so far as possible, for general reference," especially to 
residents of the Pacific Coast. But, is it not rather un- 
fair that authors should be compelled by Act of Congress 
to give away copies of their works simply to gratify "a 
wide-spread feeling" that the general public should be able 
to refer to them? Or, if the principle is just, why should 
the benefits of the Act be limited to the dwellers on the 
Pacific Coast? If the "wild and woolly Westerner" 
stands in special need of books of reference, why cannot 
the libraries buy the books? 

In the Christmas issue of The English. Illustrated 
Magazine we observe Mr. W. C. Morrow's vigorous short 
story "Treacherous Velasco." As this appeared in the 
collection of Mr. Morrow's stories published by the J. B. 
Ltppincott Company several months ago, we suppose 
that the proprietors of the English Illustrated Magazine 
allowed a considerable time to elapse between acceptance 
and publication. 

Mr. William Doxey will publish in the near future a 
volume containing a selection of poems by Howard V. 
Sutherland. The price will be one dollar, and sub- 
scribers wishing to obtain one or more copies are requested 
to notify either the publisher or the author. The book 
will be gotten up in a most attractive manner and should 
form a desirable addition to Californian literature. 

In the January Traveler we find the regular depart- 
ments, "This, That, and tbe Other," "Our Theatres," and 
"Conservative Use of Current Events," and two stories, 
"That 'Coon Hunt," by Bourdon Wilson, and "On a New 
Year's eve," by Henry C. Whitney. The fifth installment 
of "A trip to the Orient" takes us to Kioto and Nikko. 
There is an excellent half-tone portrait of Florida Kings- 
ley, a member of the Alcazar Stock Company, and the 



cover-design showing an old sailor seated on the stern of a 
boat drawn up on shore and explaining a model schooner 
to ;> small boy. is good. In the comments on the first page 
the Editor predicts that, unless the great European 
powers combine against Russia, she will, within five years, 
dominate the world. Now to prophesy when you don't 
know is proverbially rash, but to set a limit within which 
the event you profess to foretell is to happen or your 
prophecy be proved false is an act of unnecessary temer- 
ity^ 

BANKING. 

Bank of British Columbia. 

Southeast Gor. Bush AND Sansome Sts. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, 1862. 

Capital Paid Up 18,000,000 

Reserve Fund t 600,000 

HEAD OFFICE 60 LOMBARD Street, London 

Branches— Victoria, Vancouver, New Westminster, Kamloops, Nan- 
iamo, Nelson, Sandon, and Kaslo, British Columbia; Portland, Oregon. 
This Bank transac ts a Oeneral Banking Business . Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, and Special DeposltB received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon Its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents, as follows: 

New York— Merchants' Bank of Canada; Chicago — First National Bank; 
Liverpool— North and South Wales Bank; Scotland — British Linen 
Company; Ireland — Bank of Ireland; Mexico— London Bank of Mexico; 
South America— London Bank of Mexico and South America; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China; Australia and 
New Zealand — Bank of Australasia and Commercial Banking Company or 
Sydney, Ld ; Demerara and Trinidad (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 

The Anglo- Californian Bank, Limited. 

Capital authorized. 16,000,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 

Paid Up 1,600,000 

Reserve Fund 700,000 

N. E. Cob. Pink and Sanso b Sib 
Head Office — 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Sellgman & Co., 81 Broad street. 

The Bank transacts a General Banking Business, sells drafts, makes 

telegraphic transfers, and Issues letters of credit available throughout the 

world. Sends blllff 'or collection, loans money, buys and sells exohange 

and bullion. IGN. STEINHABT l ManttI . era 

P. N. LILIENTHAL J Managers 

The German Savings and Loan Society. 

No. 526 California Street. San Francisco 

Guarantee capital and surplus 88.109,000 99 

Capital actually paid np In cash.. 1,000 000 00 

Deposits December 31, 18W 26,889,633 36 

OFFICERS: President, B A. Booker; First Vioe-President, Daniel 
Meyer; Second Vice-President, H. Horstman; Cashier, A. H. R Schmidt; 
Assistant Cashier. William Herrmann; Seoretary, George Tourny; Assist- 
ant Seoretary, A. H. Muller; Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS : B A. Becker. Daniel Meyer. H. Horst- 
mann, Tgn. Steinhart, N. Van Bergen, E. Rohte, H. B. Russ, D. N. 
Walter and N. Ohlandt- 

Wells Fargo & Go.'s Bank. 

N. E. Corner Sansome & Sutter Streets 

John J. Valentine President 

Homer S.King Manager 

H. WadBworth Cashier 

F. L. Lipman Assistant Cashier 

Cash Capital and Surplus 16,260,000 

BRANCHES. 
N Y City, H. B. Parsons, Cashier. | Salt Lake City. J. E. Dooly, Cashier 
Portland, Or.. R M. Dooly, Cashier. 
Directors— John J. Valentine, Benj. P. Cheney, Oliver Eldrldge, Henry 

E. Huntington. Homer S. King, George E. Gray, John J. MoCook, John 
Bermingham. Dudley Evans. 

SWiSS American Bank ° fL ARNO, Switzerland, and 

California Mortgage & Savings Bank, SST" 

Paid up Capital and Reserves, 8620 000. 

A general savings and commercial banking business transacted. Inter- 
est paid on savings deposits. Loans on approved real estate security, and 
on commercial paper. ■ 

DIRECTORS— Ernst A. Denicke, A. Sbarboro J. C Rued, E. Martinonl, 
F C Siebe. A. Tognazzini. H Brunner, MoD R. Venable, A. G Wieland, 

F. Kronenberg. Charles Martin, C. Gehret.P. Tognazzini, S. Grand!. 

SeGiiritu Savings Bank. 

222 Montgomery St.. Mills Building. 

INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. 

LOANS MADE. 

DIRECTORS. 
William Alvord S.L.Abbot Jr. H. H. Hewlett 
Wm Baboook O. D. Baldwin E. J. MoCutohen 
Adam Grant W. S. JoneB R.H. Pease 

HUMBOLDT SAVINGS AND LORN S061ETY. 

No. 18 Geary Street. 
Directors: Adolph C. Weber, President; W. J. Lowry, Vice-Presi- 
dent; ErnestBrand, Seoretary; W. S. Keyes; I. Kohn; G. H. Luchslnger; 
C. E. Hatch, Attorney. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 15, 1898. 



|at Mn»i M 



5UNBEAMS 



muuniui ■ 



After he bad kissed her and pressed 
her rosy cheek against his and patted 
ber soft round chin she drew back 
and asked: "George, do you shave 
yourself?" "Yes," be replied. "I 
thought so," she said. "Your face is 

the roughest I ever " Then she 

stopped, but it was too late, and he 
went away with a cold, heavy lump in 
his breast.— Chicago News. 

"John." said a loving wife, "I wish 
you would sing two or three lines of a 
song for me." "What on earth do 
you want me to do that for?" "There 
is something I want you to bring 
home, and I've forgotten what it is, 
but I think I'll remember it if you 
sing." The good-natured husband 
complied, and the charming wife said: 
"I remember now. It's a file I want." 
—Odds and Ends. 

Teacher— Susie, why are you late? 
Susie — We had company dowo to our 
house. "What?" "Two's company, 
ain't it? Well it's a little brother an' 
sister, an' tbey corned this mornin' 
with the doctor, an' pa looks orful 
worried." — Philadelphia Record. 

"The new woman," remarked the 
observer of men and things, "is noth- 
ing if not religious. She advances 
Bible in hand. Often, to be sure, the 
bible is bound to match her gloves, 
but that is another story." — Detroit 
Journal. 

The cake belongs right out in Iowa. 
A man out there placed six china 
eggs under a hen, and the faithful 
creature sat on them until she hatched 
out an even half dozen beautiful 
Italian marble statues. — Yonkers 
Statesman. 

Brown — Bluview is a confirmed 
pessimist, isn't he? Junes — Yes; I 
knew him when he was a boy. One 
Christmas eve he had a gloomy spell 
because he happened to think how 
sorry he'd be when Christmas was 
over. — Puck. 

"My wife got even with that burg- 
lar who set the burglar alarm going 
and woke the baby." "What did she 
do?" "She pulled him in by Ibe collar 
and made him rock the baby to sleep 
again." — Detroit Free Press. 

Employer — I dismissed my last 
watchman on account of his intemper- 
ate habits. Now, are you sober? 
Applicant — Yes, sir; very often. — 
Pick-Me-Up. 

A Wonderful Talking Machine. 

Perfection has at last surely been reached Id 
talking machines The latest and most perfect 
machine has Just come out It is loud and clear, 
and reproduces your own or any voice over and 
over attain; speeches from the most noted states- 
men, sung* from the world's greatest singers, 
music from the greatest bands. The price of this 
wonderful machine is but 910. and it affords a 
wonderful opponunlty for those who wish to 
give public entertainments; $10 to $20 can be 
made every evening exhibiting this taking ma* 
chine in halls, churohes. school houses, and 
other public places This machine is now coo- 
trolled by. and catalogues and full particulars 
oan be had from, Sears. Roebuck & Co., 
Chicago. Just cut this notice out and send to 
them for a book telllDg all about It. 



The only 

tobacco that has 

that delicious Cham= 

pagne Flavor, and the 

New Five=Cent Piece 

is nearly as large as 

the 5=cent piece of 

common brands 

—try it. 



PIPER 
HEIDSIECK 



ami 



TOBACCO 

CHAMPAGNE 
FLAVOR 



J. D. Spreckels & Bros. Co. 

Shipping and Commission Mer- 
chants. General agents 

Oceanic Steamship Company. 

Gllllngham Cement. 

327 Market St.. cor. Fremont, S. F. 

George Morrow, & Go., 

(Established 1864.) 

fifty ftND GRftIN 

Commission Merchants. 
Warehouse 526 Seventh St. 

128 Clay street, S. P. Tel. Main 85 



GEORGE GOODMAN. 

Patentee and Manufacturer of 

Artificial Stone, 

in all its br&fiotaen 
ISchillinger's Patentl 

Side walk and Garden walk a specialty 

Office: 307 Montgomery street (Nevada block 

San Francisco, 



PACIFIC TOWEL COMPANY. Ll .? a P ,L» 

Furnishes clean towels at tbe following low 
rates : Clean hand towels each wei k, $1 per 
month; 12 clean hand towels each week $1 50 
per month; 4 olean roller towels each week. 
*1 per month ; 6 olean roller towels each 
week, |1 * per month. 



January 15. 1898. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



'7 



IN SURANCE . 

THE reinsurance of the Manhattan Fire of New York, 
just after reorganization and re-christening, with the 
Union, is a surprise to everybody, and something more 
serious to Davis & Henry, the recently-appointed Coast 
agents. This firm has been to considerable expense in- 
troducing agencies in various parts of the Coast, and the 
loss to them will be considerable. The firm is amply pro- 
tected, however, in its contract, and will doubtless claim 
substantial damages. There is an excellent line of busi- 
ness here for some company iu quest of an opening on the 
Coast. 

W. C. Leavitt, of the Union Mutual, recently enter- 
tained some fifteen of his agents at dinner. 

Colonel Alex. 6. Hawes, London manager of the New 
York Life, is still in this city, detained by the serious ill- 
ness of Mrs. Hawes. 

Mrs. Sara Hartman has taken charge of the woman's 
department of the Washington Life. 

Manager L. B. Edwards of the Manchester is a sufferer 
from the recent severe frost in Florida. He has an ex- 
tensive orange orchard in that State. 

Hugo Wesendonck, who has been President of the Ger- 
mania Life Insurance Company of New York since the 
date of its organization in I860, has resigned. - 

Jack Kilgarif, the wide-awake manager of the Pacific 
Mutual Life, will probably be the next president of the 
San Francisco Life Underwriters' Association. 

The fire underwriters of this city gave Robert Dickson, 
United States manager- of the Royal Exchange Assurance 
(one of the millionaire companies of England) a banquet at 
the Palace Hotel last Wednesday evening. Mr. Dickson 
is one of the oldest, as well as one of the most popular, in- 
surance men in the city, and the farewell dinner was ten- 
dered to him upon the eve of his departure to New York, 
where he goes to reside permanently, in command of the 
Royal. The banquet was a happy testimonial of the high 
esteem in which Mr. Dickson is held in this field; and he 
goes hence bearing the regrets of the insurance men of 
San Francisco that he is leaving the city, and as well their 
heartiest wishes for his unbounded future fortunes. 

The Philadelphia Underwriters, composed of the Insur- 
ance Company of North America and the Fire Association 
of Philadelphia, with combined cash capital of $3,500,000, 
assets of $15,609,932, surplus of $6,826,157,. has en- 
tered the Pacific Coast States under the management of 
the Western Department of the Fire Association. Mr. 
W. H. Cunningham, manager; Henry W. Bush and J. M. 
Beck, assistant managers, Chicago, 111. Mr. T. C. Shank- 
land will act as State agent for California, Arizona and 
Nevada, aDd J. D. Richards as manager of San Francisco 
city department; office, No. 219 Sansome street, San 
Francisco, Cal. Assistant manager Beck is now in the 
city, and will visit most of the larger Coast cities before 
returning to Chicago. 

Smedberg & Mitchell have resigned the agency of the 
New Zealand. 

The Mutual Life of New York has/withdrawn from 
Kansas. 

The Guarantors' Finance has withdrawn from Ohio. 

The Niagara Fire Insurance Company has been exam- 
ined by the New York Insurance Department, and its 
affairs found to be in excellent condition. 

Major Jas. B. Day returned this week from a visit to 
the Southern field. The Washington Life has made re- 
markable progress under the change of the agency man- 
agement effected a little over one year ago. 

The annual statement of the New York Life Insurance 
Company is just out, and is a voluminous document, setting 
forth the affairs of the company to a nicety and in a man- 
ner plainly to be understood. During the year this com- 
pany issued the astonishing amount of $134,000,000 of new 
business, which is $14,000,000 more business than the com- 
pany placed in 1896. Last year the company paid in 
death losses $9,752,000, and in matured policies about the 
same amount. 

" Brown's Bronchial Troches " are unequaled for olearing the voice. 
Pnblie speakers and singers the world over use them. 



FlNEstationery, steel and oopper-ptate engraving. 

Market street, San Pranoisco. 



Cooper & Oo. , 746 



H. M. NEWHALL & CO, 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS 

Fire and Marine Insurance Agents, 

309 and 311 Sansome St. - - - • San Francisco, Cal 

CORRESPONDENTS : 

FINDLAY, DURHAM & BRODIE 43 and 16 Threadnccdle SULondoa 

SIMPSON. MACK1RDY & CO,. 29 South Castle St., Liverpool 

INSURANCE. 

FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 



Firemans Fund 



INSURANCE COMPANY, OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Capital, $1,000,000. 



Assets, $3,500,000, 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited), OP MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 
SOLID SECURITY. OVER $9,000,000.00 RESOURCES 

OHAS. A. LATON, Manager. 439 California St., S. F, 
Fire Insurance. 



CONNECTICUT FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF HARTFORD. 

Capital Paid Up '. 11,000,000 

Assets 7. 3,300,018 

Surplus to Poltoy Holders 1,668,333 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager. 
COLIN M. BOYD. n. W.Oor. SioramentoandM:ratgom3rySts.,S. F, 



BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSURANCE CO., LIMITED, 

OP LIVERPOOL. 

Capital 16,700,000 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE St, CO., Agents, 

No. 316 California St., S. P 

Founded A. D. 179? 

Insurance Company ot North America 

OF PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 

Paid up Capital '. • 13,000,000 

Surplus to Policy Holders 6,022,016 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent, 412 California St., S. F. 

PHOENIX ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON Established 1782. 
PROVIDENCE-WASHINGTON INSURANCE CO. i-oorporatea «»« 

BUTLER & HALDAN, General Agents, 

413 California St., S. F. 

THE THURINGIA INSURANCE COMPANY. 

Of ERFURT, GERMANY. 
Capital J2.250.000 Assets. $10,081,248. 
Pacific Coast Department : 2 4-208 SANSOME ST., S. F. 

VOSS. CONRAD & CO., General Managers . 

Accident Employers Liability and Fidelity Bonds Insurance. 

THE GUARANTORS FINANCE COMPANY OF PHILADELPHIA. 

ARTHUR C. DONNELL, Gen. Agent Pacific Coast. 401 California St- 



i8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 15, 1898. 




SLL the teas last Saturday proved pleasant affairs, in 
spite of the cold, misty rain which was the climatic 
feature of the afternoon. At Mrs. Dickson's the decora- 
tions were extremely pretty, palms and willow branches 
being combined with pink roses with good effect. The re- 
ceiving party consisted of Mrs. C. L. Watson, Mrs. G. W. 
Bowers, Mrs. G. H. Powers, and the Misses Eva and Mat- 
Moody, Bertie Bruce, Florence Stone, Agnes Simpson, 
Amy Smith, Lottie Cunningham, Edith Allyn, Catherine 
Powers, Mamie Shoobert, and Augusta Kent. After the 
reception was over dinner was served, to which were bid- 
den Messrs. Leonard Chenerv, George Gibbs, Douglas 
Watson, Frank Brooks, H. H. Scott, Dupont Coleman, 
Donald Smith, H. T. Dutton, Brook Wright, and John 
Tweedale; and later in the evening the entire party ad- 
journed to Lunt's Hall and took part in the cotillion of 
the Saturday Night Club. 

At Mrs. Gordon Blanding's tea the attendance was 
vpry large, and the spacious rooms were elaborately 
decorated with foliage intermingled with all the season's 
blooms. The ladies who assisted Mrs. and Miss Blanding 
were Mesdames Lloyd and Will Tevis, Mrs. E. B. Coleman, 
Mrs Salisbury; the Misses Genevieve Goad, Hattie Belle 
Goad, Miriam Moore, Edna Hopkins, Anita Baldwin, 
Bessie Bowie, Kate and Maggie Salisbury, Bessie Ames. 
Muriel Atherton, Florence Breckenridge, Clemmie Kip, 
Caro Crockett, Edith McBean, Delia Davidson, May Fried- 
lander, Lilly Follis, Clara Hamilton, Mary Kip, Florence 
Josselyn. Helen Thornton, Frances Moore and Helen 
Hopkins. 

On Sunday afternoon an elaborate tea was given by 
Mrs. Max Davis, at her residence on Pacific avenue, for 
the (hV,ul of her daughter. Miss Mattie. The rooms were 
beautifully adorned with violets, roses, ferns, ponisetta, 
hyacinths and acacia blooms, the bay window being ar- 
ranged as a bower of ferns, chrysanthemums and roses. 
The Misses Stella Schwabacher, Edith Cohen, Gertie 
Ettinger, Helen Seller and Elsie Levy formed a charmiog 
corps of assistants. The rooms were crowded all after- 
noon, and delicious refreshments were served at ltt€-d.-l6li 
tables in the dining-room. The reception was followed by 
a dinner, at which the receiving party and an equal num- 
ber of gentlemen were entertained. 

The Monday Evening Dancing Class opened the present 
week with their monthly meeting at Golden Gate Hall, 
which was well attended, and a very pleasant affair gen- 
erally. 

Mr. Robert Dickson, who is on the eve of departure for 
New York, was guest of honor at several dinners this 
week, one of which was given at the Palace Hotel (men- 
tioned elsewhere); another, which took place at the Cos- 
mos Club on Tuesday evening, had Mr. Colin M. Boyd for 
host; the guests were seated at a round table, which was 
decorated with La France roses and parma violets, and 
there were Messrs. L. Lloyd White, F. W. Dickson, Ben. 
J. Smith, G. M. Pierce. Colonel Wm. McDonald and Dr. 
Robert McKenzie. 

Yesterday Mrs. and the Misses Franks gave a tea at 
their home on Post street, and last evening the Friday 
Fortnightlies had their semi-monthly dance at Lunt's Hall. 

Owing to Mrs. Alvord's continued ill-health, the ball she 
promised her granddaughter, Miss Ethel Keeney, upon 
her dibut, could not be given, but no doubt the dinner 
which was substituted for it, at the University Club last 
week, proved equally satisfactory to many of the guests, 
the only drawback being that it was more circumscribed 
in number than a dance would have been. Mrs. C. C. 
Keeney and Mr. William Alvord presided, and the decora- 
tions of the table were in green and red. Mrs. C. L. 
Bent, net Ethel Cohen, w^s the only married lady among 
the guests; the others were the Misses Charlotte Ellin- 



wood, Leontine Blakeman, Emma Butler, Alice Hoffman, 
Helen Thornton, Addie Murphy, Maybelle Gwin, Ethel 
Keeney, Messrs. J. D. Phelan, Nick Kittle, Ed Greenway 
Southard Hoffman, Fred Greenwood, and Lieutenants 
Bent, Wilcox, Kilbourne, and Gardiner, U. S. A. 

Mrs. James Goeway's recent luncheon was tropical in 
character, out of compliment to Mrs. Herbert Vos, who 
was the guest of honor, Hawaiian decorations and Hawai- 
ian music being the features of the affair, and even the 
nn n 11 had one or two dishes peculiar to that locale. The 
guests, twelve in number, were all married ladies: Mrs. P. 
B. C irnwall, Mrs. C. H. Livermore, Mrs. Irving Scott, 
Mrs. J. M. Chretian, Mrs. J. J. Brice, Mrs. O. H. Wood, 
Mrs E. B. Pond, Mrs. Homer King, Mrs. F. J. Sanborne, 
Mrs. Marie Morris, and Mrs. Vos. 

Miss Huntington's luncheon last week was given at the 
University Club, and the party numbered twelve. 

At Mrs. Albert Miller's recent tea in Oakland there 
were quite a number of guests from San Francisco; the 
decorations were lovely, and the hostess was assisted in 
her duties by the Misses Alice and Annie Herrick, Jessie 
Glascock, Carrie Haven, Marguerite Jollifie, Belle Mhoon, 
and Juliet Garber. 

The indications are that the month of February will be 
what is called a dancing month — in other words, dances 
will be the favored form of entertainment. For instance, 
the hop at the Presidio opens the month in a most charm- 
ing manner. On Wednesday evening, the 2d, the post- 
poned dance of the Terpsichoreans will take place at 
Lunt's Hall. The regret caused by the final decision on 
the part of the powers that rule such affairs that there 
shall not be any ilnnli Gins ball at the Art Institute this 
year, has been somewhat mitigated iu society circles by 
the announced intention of Mrs. S. G. Murphy to give a 
fancy-dress coti'.lion in Maple Hall of the Palace Hotel on 
the evening of February 4th. Then there are several other 
dances at private houses under discussion, most of them 
sure to materialize, to say nothing of the dances of the 
Friday fortnightlies, the Friday Night Cotillion Club, the 
Monday evening, the Wednesday evening, and the Satur- 
day Xight dancing classes, the Entre Nous Club cotillion. 
etc. 

The date of the Borel ball has at last been definitely ar- 
ranged, and yielding to the dislike of Mr. Borel to have 
his house so upset, as is the inevitable conscquei ecof hold- 
ing an entertainment of that description therein, Mrs. 
Borel has decided that the approaching brilliant function 
shall be given at Native Sons' Hall on Thursday evening, 
January 20th. This is regarded as a wise move on Mis. 
Borel's part, for though the guests are to be almost ex- 
clusively young people, when dancing is on the programme 
one cannot have too much room, and this a hail will give 
far better than the limited dimensions of a private house. 

The Cinderellas' next dance, on the evening of the 2(ith, 
is anticipated with great pleasure, the first gathering of 
the new club proving such a delightful affair. The ball to 
be given by the Century Club, on the evening of the 27th, 
is sure to be most pleasant, and on the 28th, the Entre 
Nous Club give another of their pretty cotillions at Maple 
Hall. 

The engagement of Miss Maude Cooper Russell and Sidney 
de Witt Allen is announced. The young people are resi- 
dents of Alameda and prominent in social circles. Miss 
Russell has lived very quietly for the past year, owing to 
the death of her mother, that took place one year ago. 
The wedding will be quite a society event. 

The wedding of Mrs. Matilda Gregory and Herman 
Shainwald, which was solemnized at the home of the bride 
on Broadway last Tuesday, was a very quiet ceremonial. 
The Rev. C. A. Buck bee tied the nuptial knot at noon, in 
the presence of relatives of the contracting parties only, 
and after a bridal dejeuner the newly wedded couple de- 
parted for a honeymoon trip South. After their return 
Mrs. Shainwald will be "at home" on Wednesdays after 
February 1st, at 2012 Broadway. 

The most prominent of recently announced engagements 
is that of Miss Harriet Kay to Frank Vail, which was 
made public a few days ago. The wedding, which is to 
take place at the home of the bride in Alameda early next 



January 15, 1898. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



'9 



month, is to be a very quiet one. The bride was regarded 
as a noted beauty during her long residence at Santa Cruz, 
and the groom is a very popular man in business, club and 
social circles of San Francisco. 

On Wednesday Miss Henrietta Meyer and Mortimer 
Davis were married at the residence of Mrs. A. Brown on 
California street. Next Wednesday evening at half-past 
eight o'clock, the marriage of Miss Mae Miller and Marshal 
Hale will be solemnized at St. Luke's Church on Van Ness 
avenue. 

From Oakland comes the announcement of Miss Mattie 
Knowles' engagement to C. T. Bliss of Glenbrook, with the 
wedding a probable event of the near future. 

There have been very pleasant times over at the Hotel 
Rafael of late, so many are making that delightful place 
their winter quarters. To these are added frequent par- 
ties from town who go over for a few days at a time, tour- 
ists from the East who are anxious to judge for them- 
selves of that famed resort, and several of the British 
naval men recently in port paid a visit to the Hotel. Dur- 
ing the late moonlight there were moonlight driving par- 
ties on one or two occasions; one of them, arranged by the 
Baron Von Schroder, was particularly pleasant. Among 
those in the party were the Baroness Von Schroder, Mrs. 
Warfield, Mrs. Fred Green, Mr. and Mrs. Warbur- 
ton, the Misses Dillon, Miss Ada Sullivan, etc. , and upon 
the return to the hotel after the drive an appetizing sup- 
per brought the evening to a most charming conclusion. 

Mrs. A. J. Bowie's many friends will be pleased to hear 
that she is convalescing satisfactorily after her recent 
serious illness. 

The arrivals of the week include Mr. and Mrs. C. A. 
Low, of New York, old residents of San Francisco, who 
usual'y pay their former home a visit sometime during the 
winter; Mrs. John A. Logan and Mrs. George Pullman, 
who will be the guests of Mrs. Frank Carolan during their 
stay hereabouts. Mrs. Hamilton Smith, her daughter 
Miss Edith, and her niece Miss Carter, who arrived last 
week, are at the Palace for a stay of some duration. Later 
on Mr. Smith will join them here. Mrs.. Reginald Brook is 
visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Sam Holladay. 

Mrs. A. J. Ralston is spending the winter in Louisville, 
Kentucky, with her daughter, Mrs. Bullitt, nee Claire Ral- 
ston. Mrs. J. R. Jarboe and Mrs. J. Case Bull left for a 
visit to New York this week. 

Dr. B. Apple has returned, after a year's visit to the 
leading hospitals of the East and Europe. . 

Miss Magda M. Heuermann, a noted Chicago artist, is 
on a visit to this Coast, and is the guest of Mrs. T. W. 
Church, at 572 Harrison street. 

Chris. Jorgensen has been elected a life member of the 
Press Club. 

L. A. Schwabacher left for Seattle last Saturday, and 
will be absent two weeks. 



Nickel Plate — West Shore Fitchburg Route. 

The popular low-rate short line between Chicago and Buffalo, New 
York, Boston, and other Eastern cities. Three elegantly-equipped, 
vestibuled trains daily; Wagner sleeping cars and Nickel Plate Din- 
ing Cars. No change of cars Chicago to New York, or Chioago to 
Boston. For particulars, address B. P. Horner, G. P. and T. A. , Cleve- 
land, O.; J. Y.Calahan, G. A., Ill Adams street, Chicago. 111., or 
Jay W. Adams, P. C. P. A., 37 Crocker Building, San Francisco, Cal. 



These chilly days the capacity of Swains bakery, 213 Sutter street, 
has been fully tested by ladies who have been down town shop- 
ping. A fine lunch is served there every day and the excellence of 
the service and appetizing menu have been especially appreciated. 
A fine table d'hote dinner is served every evening at Swain's from 
5 to 8 o'clock for $1.00 Orders for pastries and confections promptly 
filled. 

J. F. Cutler and Argonaut whiskies are just the drinks to keep 
out cold, ward off sickness and invigorate the system these fresh 
cold days. Physicians recommend Argonaut and Cutter because" 
they are pure. Tried by time and always filling the bill these 
liquors are always the favorite drinks of connoisseurs. E. Martin & 
Co. 411 Market street, sole agents for the Pacific Coast. 



A SPLENDID RESTAURANT. 



THE view from the fifteenth story of the Spreckels 
Building is inspiring. Three hundred feet above the 
street, away from its noise and turmoil, the delighted eye 
feasts on the middle distances and the further scenery. 
San Francisco never better deserves the title of "Pictur- 
esque" than when its many points of interest are being 
viewed from the broad windows beneath the dome of the 
Spreckels Building. That whole story affords the very 
best location for . a restaurant in all this city. It is no 
wonder then that the popular and well-known caterer, 
Mr. S. Conslantini, who has won a fine reputation as pro- 
prietor of the splendid Maison Tortoni, at 111 O'Farrell 
street, has leased this entire floor, and fitted it up beauti- 
fully for a first-class restaurant. San Francisco has the 
reputation of furnishing better meals for less money than 
any other city in the United States The Cafe Spreckels, 
presided over by Mr. Constantini, will add to this reputa- 
tion. 

In this splendid establishment the prices for enter- 
tainment are most reasonable — a fine lunch with wine 
costs but 75 cents, or a la carte if desired; and full dinner 
will be served for one dollar. Every attention is paid to 
the comfort of guests. Complete service and appetizing 
menus will satisfy the most fastidious appetite, and the 
grand scenery will charm the eye. A lunch, dinner or 
supper at Cafe Spreckels, three hundred feet above the 
street, and under the skilled direction of Constantini is 
a double pleasure. Three swift-running elevators take 
the guests safely and quickly to the Cafe. It is just the 
convenient place for the business man's mid-day lunch, the 
dinner later, and ah hour for a favored tete-il-lUe after the 
theatre at night. 



Why does your grocer like Schilling' 1 s Best 
baking powder ? 
Because. 



Baggage Noilce. 



Baggage called for and delivered 
at trains, steamers, etc. Trunks 
35 cents. Baggage called for, 
. weighed and checked at your 
Hotel or residence. Trunks 50c. 



PACIFIC TRANSFER CO., 20 Sutter St. 



Partington's School 



MAGAZINE and 
of ... . NEWSPAPER 
424 PINE STREET, S. F. ILLUSTRATION- 

Extra Glasses on Saturdays and evenings. 



LUDLM.^ 

928 Sutter St. 



ELOCUTION and 

DRAMATIC ART. 



The SOLLY WALTER School ot Illustration, 



In Pen and ink. 



26 O'Farrell Street. 



Schraeder Bros., 

BUTCHERS. 



FAMILY TRADE A SPECIALTY. 
1342 Market St., San Francisco. 



Dressmaking Parlous. Prices 85 up. Perfeot satisfaction. 
B. Campbell, 714 MoAlltster St. Telephone, Steiner 1693. 



Mrs. M. 



WANTED:— Several trustworthy gentlemen or ladies to. travel in Cali- 
fornia for established, reliable house. Salary 8780 and expenses. 
Steady position. Enclose reference ami self-addressed stamped envelope. 
The Dominion Company, Dept. 7, Chicago. Ill . 



20 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 15, 1898. 



^>, I V~ I ■ .-1 -i A, ?-r,,\c/-7- 



OXE of the characters of the down-town business dis- 
trict is the colored gentleman who "officiates" in the 
elevator of the Alaska Packers' Association. This lift is 
an ideal spot for one of luxuiio'is lastes. Originally con- 
structed on an old-fashioned plan, it has retained its light 
ar.d commodious features since it has undergone modern- 
izing treatment. 

A comfortable arm chair has heen provided for the ele- 
vator man, and this ingenious coon has devised a system 
by which he can perform his duties with the least possible 
inconvenience. To the door of the elevator he has at- 
' ached two strings, which he gathers in his har.d with the 
air of Walter H..bart on the box seat. By pulling one 
string the door is opened; the other closes it. The Afri- 
can is of a studious turn, is never seen without a boik, 
from which, while at work, he never raises his eyes. 

A gentleman enters the elevator. Without pausing in 
his reading, the coon pulls a string and the door closes. 
The visitor is expected to announce his floor, without be- 
ing questioned. Another string opens the door and affords 
him exit, while the reading still continues. 

Since the operator has become famous, because of his 
idiosyncracies, many enter the elevator simply to study 
his professional methods. Not long ago, Henry Fortmann, 
Pre>ident of the Alaska Packers' Association, who, as the 
accredited recipient of $1000 a month, is the greatest man 
known to the coon, played a little trick on the colored 
student. 

When Mr. F.prlmann stepped into the elevator, the coon 
never raised his eyes, but started upward. 

"Is Mr. Fortmann in his office ? " asked the President 
in a tone of assumed falsetto intended to conceal bisiden- 
tity. 

'"No, sah," answered the African, still reading. ''But 
Mr. Fortmann will be in his office, sah, when you steps out 
that door, sah! " 

# # * 

The day before the Durrant execution Mr. Frank Jaynes 
of the Western Union Telegraph Company was informed 
that several strangers had been patrolling their line, ex- 
amining their insulators and carefully noting all the points 
along their way. Their actions were regarded with sus- 
picion, and it was suspected that it was their intention to 
cut the wire so that the Telegraph Company could not get 
out any messages from the prison on that day. Mr. 
Frank Jaynes took prompt action. He at once ordered a 
patrol to be put along the lice with strict injunctions to 
shoot anybody caught tampering with the wires. The 
telegraph people strongly suspect who employed these 
men, as they are patrons of the rival wire, being the same 
parties who wheu north attempted to bribe an official of 
the Western Union Company not to let any dispatches 
come south regarding the return of the Klondike miners. 
It is a great pity that Mr. Jaynes could not have let the 
parties do this work and then have them arrested or had 
them killed. It need not be said who were the instigators 
of this criminal piece of enterprise. It is this species of 
enterprise which these people consider wonderful, and 
think that by so doing they are engaged in work which 
attracts attent'on to them acd their ways. These people 
have long been engaged in debauching everybody that 
comes their way. They have bribed telephone people, 
telegraph operators— and minor officials— but when it 
comes to tampering nith the wires so as to obtain exclu- 
sive information it is time that somebody in a responsible 
position should be brought up with a sharp turn. 

* « » 

Mr. W. G. Stafford of the Bohemian Club who has sud- 
denly acquired culture, has also acquired a wide and ac- 
curate knowledge of the art of painting. He speaks with 
one of authority on "middle distance," "technique," 
"atmosphere," "chiaro-oscuro" but his greatest forte is 
"values'' in a painting. Now alt this diffusive knowledge 
is much admired by those of his friends who have an in- 
stinctive knowledge of the value of dry goods, coal 



or other merchantable commodities, and to him. they turn 
as the only true connoisseur of art. Therefore inflated 
with pride, which is only natural to a man whose 
appreciation of art has been confined to yellow wagons 
with his name painted in with scarlet lettering, and the 
only school wherein his artistic instincts have been cultured 
being the depot at the Oakland mole, and his strictures 
on those as well as on the paintings on the ferry boats hav- 
ing been received with much respect, it is but natural that 
Mr. Stafford should modestly style himself "the Ruskio of 
San Francisco." Now Mr. Stafford, for really he is mod- 
est, would never permit himself to thrust himself into 
prominence in art matters were it not for his admirers. 
Therefore much against bis will he was placed upon the 
barging committee of the club. Mr. Stafford entered into 
the work with enthusiasm. An artist at the late exhibi- 
tion did all the work, but thesoulof Stafford could not rest 
content and so after the work was finished he with a small 
boy undertook the work of improvement. His artistic 
eyes — Mr. Stafford has two — fell upon some pictures 
painted by an artist with whom he is not in accord. The 
artist and Mr. Stafford do not agree on art matters, but 
what is the value of an artist's opinion against that of a 
man who sells coal? 

"My boy," said Mr. Stafford to the youth who followed 
him, "that picture ain't up to the standard is it?" 

Like all great men Mr. Stafford is not a\erse to seeking 
the opinions of the uncultured. 

" You bet," said the boy. A vague idea was enter- 
tained by him that he bad to agree. 

" You are right," replied Mr. Stafford, patronisingly. 
"You are lost in this atmosphere — my boy. I will give 
you work in my coalyard wherein you can have a chance 
to distingui-h yourself. Take this picture and hang it in 
the hallway. Such a picture," continued the art con- 
noisseur, "has no place where it is." And therefore the 
pictu re which received the prize was removed to an 
obscure corner where it is still banging. 



The Reverend Father Lagan is not particularly happy 
over the notoriety he has achieved in connection with the 
gallows conversion to Roman Catholicism of Theodore 
Durrant. The priest is a typical country curate, fat, red 
of visage, jolly, fond of good cheer and good stories. He 
is idolized by his parishioners and is, beyond doubt, the 
most popular man who ever steps within the walls of San 
Quentin Prison. 

One hot summer day he was driving at a furious pace 
along a road north of San Rafael, when he met a friend 
who remonstrated with him at his rapid gait on such a 
sultry day, when there was not a breath of air stirring. 

"Why, Father," he said, pointing reproachfully to the 
steaming animal. "Look at your horse! Do you want to 
kill him this hot day.' " 

"Oh, that's all right," responded the jovial padre 
cheerily. "I am driving him that way because its my 
system." 

"System! What system?" demanded the astonished 
parishioner. 

"Why," said the man of God, explanatorily. "That 
horse is cooler now than if I had driven him slowly. Don't 
you understand that the faster I go, the more wind I 
create, and that naturally cools the horse!" 
» # # 

At a little stag dinner given by Fred Berlin, formerly 
known as "the youngest rai'rnad president in the United 
States," the lo*t was discoursing upon art and artists, 
admiring the works of the dead masters, regretting that 
there were none living to take their places, and predicting 
that it would probably be a long time before the world 
would again see a really great painter. 

"Where," he asked, "can we find another Turner, a 
Cjrot or a Jean Francois Millet?" 

"Now, look here, Bergin," said one of his guests, 
diringly. "You make a great mistake about Millet. He 
was not a great painter. As a matter of fact, Millet died 
of starvation!" 

" But how do you explain the value now placed on his 
pictures?" demanded Bergin, stoutly. 

"Ob, that's easily explained," was the undaunted reply. 
" Millet's studio was found to be full of pictures, which 



January 15, 1898, 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTF.R. 



were picked up for & song by the dealers. Then the 
dealers had eulogistic articles written about the dead 
artist, his genius, and his works. When Millet had been 
sufficiently boomed, his pictures were gradually placed on 
the market, each painting being heralded as a fresh 
triumph." 

This remarkable but answerable disclosure was received 
with unbroken silence. Finally the host propounded 
another query. 

" Who is the greatest hviDg artist?" he asked. 

"James McNeil Whistler." was the unhesitating reply. 

" Never heard of him!" declared Bergin, convinced that 
he w as being jollied. 

# # * 

In fine weather many skirted visitors wander out to the 
scenic links of the Golf Club, overlooking the Presidio. As 
a rule the spectators are friends of the players, but occa- 
sionally the onlookers can claim acquaintance with neither 
golf nor golfers. 

Last Saturday theredrifted over the sand dunes a stout 
but handsome girl, becomingly attired in a tailor-made suit 
of blue serge, accompanied by a trio of the same. She 
undertook to enlighten her friends regarding the mysteries 
of the game, to the ill-concealed delight of some of the bet- 
ter informed spectators, and to the utter disgust of an 
enthu?iastic caddie who overheard her. 

A tall player, straight and powerful, but wearing only 
a slight modification of his business suit instead of the cus- 
tomary golfers' costume, had just made a particularly 
clever drive, sending his ball from a difficult bunker to 
within a few feet of the objective hole. Tbe remarks of 
the tailor-made critic were unduly influenced by this play- 
ers' clothes. 

'Now, there is a green player," she declared, volubly. 
" This is probably the first time he has been out at the 
links. I certainly have never seen him before. Now, if 
he had known anything he would have used his putting- 
stick, not his brassy for that stroke ! I wonder who he 
can be ? " 

The implied question gave the disgusted caddie the long- 
awaited opportunity to effectually silence the talkative 
damsel. 

"That's Charley Page," he remarked rather shrilly. 
"Winner of the silver medal ! " he added, pointedly, with 

conscious pride. 

* * * 

Part of the equipment for the bombardment of evil by 
the Good Samaritan Mission is, of course, a Sunday scl.ool, 
where tbe Reverend W. I. Kip, rector and founder of the 
mission, directs the instruction of some of the better dis- 
posed young tads of the south side of Market street. Zeal 
brings to the school from the other side of town a very 
pretty girl who is the most popular of the staff of teachers. 
Her good looks and good clothes seem to act like a tran- 
quilizing charm on the members of her large class, who 
adore her. She plumes herself particularly, however, on 
her ability to make the lessons not only interesting but 
plain and memorable. On a recent Sunday she exhibited 
to her class a beautiful picture representing the father of 
John the Baptist at his* work in the temple service, ex- 
plaining that "he burned on the altar a sweet-smelling 
powder called incense, and prayed to God as the smoke 
arose." 

During the subsequent exercises, when the tall grand- 
son of the pioneer Bishop was questioning the scholars 
upon what they had learned that day, he received more or 
less irrelevant replies, until he asked : 

"What did the good man burn on the altar ? ' 

"Insects ! " unhesitatingly shouted a little boy. 

" No," exclaimed his better-informed sister. " It wasn't 
insects. It was insect powder ! " 
* * * 

Captain P. M. Delauey, the most handsome of all the 
Supervisors, is said to be desirous of obtaining a reputa- 
tion for generosity, without those large . expenditures 
which are ordinarily conditions precedent to such an esti- 
mate. Rising from the chair of bis barber one morning, 
the military civic law maker, according to the barber, 

Shirt Waist Buttons, Silver Links, and other novelties in sterling 
silver at J. N. Brittaln's, watobmaker and Jeweler, 20 Geary street. 



ostentatiously dropped a dime on the floor. He paid his 
bill to the proprietor of the shop, so it was evident that 
the dime was a graciously given tip. 

" You dropped something. Captain," remarked the 
barber, pleasantly. He distinctly discountenanced small 
chansre tips, especially when bestowed in such a lordly 
fashion. 

"Oh, that's for vou." replied the Supervisor, gener- 
ously, with the air of a Lord Bountiful. 

" You dropped something. Captain!" repeated the bar- 
ber, in a tone of peculiar distinctness. 

The Captain retraded his steps, picked up the dime and 
returned it to his pocket. 



THE calendar issued by N. W. Ayer & Son, the maga- 
zine and newspaper advertising agents of Phila- 
delphia, for 1898, is one of the mist serviceable seen this 
year. The figures are large, and can be readily seen 
across the largest office. A handsome specimen of the 
printer's art. it will be most popular with business men 
generally. Price 25 ceuts by mail. 

A Panorama 440 Miles Long, 
From the Observation Car on, the New York Central a living pan- 
orama 440 miles long may be seen. This includes the Genesse, 
Black River and Mohawk Valleys and 143 miles of the Hudson 
River, including the foothills of the Adirondack Mountains; tbe 
C ipitol at Albiny; th° Catskill Mountains; the Palisades of tbe 
Hudson and the New York Central's magnificent approach to the 
metropolis — this being the only trunk line whose trains enter Ihe 
city of New York. 

Hubsr's Del Monte Orchestra furnishes the best music for an en- 
tertainment. Telephone: Care Ben]. Curtaz, Main 1247, 



Mothers, besure and use "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup'' for your 
ohlldren while teething . 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 
Office of one Hibernia Savings and Loan Society, corner Market, McAllis- 
ter, and Jones Sts., San Francisco, December29, 1897. At a regular meeting 
of the Board of Directors of this Society, held this day, a dividend has been 
declared at the rate of Three and tbre' -fourths (394) per cent, per annum on 
all deposits for the six months ending December 31, 1897, free from all 
taxes, .and payable on and after January I, 1898. 

ROBERT J. TOBIN. Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Savings and Loan Society. 

The Board of Directors declared a dividend for the term ending Deer m- 
ber 3V, 1897. at the rate of four (4) per cent per annum on Term De- 
posits, and three and one-third (3?^) per cent per annum on Ordinary De- 
posits, free of taxes, payable on and after Monday. January 3. 1898. 

CYRUS W. OARMANY, Cashier. 

Offloe: 101 Montgomery street, cor. Sutter, San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Security Savings Bank. 

Dividends on Term Deposits at the rate of four (4) per cent per annum. 

and on Ordinary Deposits at the rate of three and one-third (3M) per oent 

per annum, free of taxes, for the half year ending Dec. 31, 1897, will be 

payable on and after Jamary 3, 1898. 

S L. ABBOT JR.. Secretary. 
Office : 222 Montgc mery s treet, Mills Building, San Francisco 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
San Francisco Savings Union. 

For the half year ending D?c. 31, 1897, a dividend has been declared at the 
rate per annum of four and two-ienths (4 2) per cent, on term deposits and 
three and five-tenths (3 5) percent, on ordinary deposits, free of taxes, 
payable on and after Monday, January 3, 1898. 

Office— 532 California street, cor. Webb LOVELL WHITE, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The German Savings and Loan Society. 

For the half year ending December 31, 1897, a dividend has been de- 
clared at the rate of four and twenty-six hundredths (4 26-liiO) per cent per 
annum on Term Deposits, and three and fifty-five hundredths (3 55-KJO) per 
cent, per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free of taxes, payable on and after 
Monday, January 3, 1898. GEO. TOURNY, Secretary. 

Office — 526 California street. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

For the half year ending December 31, 1897, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of four (4) per cent, per annum on term deposits, and three and 
one-third (3%) per cent, per annum on ordinary deposits, free of taxes, 
payable on and after Monday, January 3, 189:1. 

Office— 33 Post street. San Francisco, Cal. GEO. A. STORY, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Hutchinson Sugar Plantation Company. 

Dividend No. 51. of 10 cents per share, of the Hutchinson Sugar Planta- 
tion Company, will be payable at the office of the company, 327 Market St., 
on and after Thursday, January 20, 1898. Transfer books will close on 
Friday. January H, 1898, at 3 o'olook p.m. E. H. SHELDON, Secretary. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 15, 1898. 



A HIGHER CRITICISM BIBLE. 

WHAT has been termed "Modern Criticism," or 
" Higher Criticism," concerning itself largely with 
the questions when and by whom the Bible was written, 
may be said to have received its first prominence in 
Hobbe's " Leviathan " (1561), where the Mosaic author- 
ship of the Pentateuch was denied. Baruch Spinoza also 
expressed some radical opinions upon this subject (1670), 
and a Catholic, Richard Simon (1678), wrote at considera- 
ble length upon this topic in his "Critical History of the 
Old Testament." But the first of the great critical school 
advancing the theories of criticism as a system was Fran- 
cis Astruo (1753). From that time to the present day the 
most eminent students of Semitics, including such men as 
F. Delitzch, Kuenan, Wellhausen, and Driver, have sounded 
the depths and shallows of every verse and word to be 
found in the Bible. The modern discovery of the Assyrian 
tablets and monuments lent a new impetus to these inves- 
tigations, and the tremendous development of Semitic 
philology offered surer ground upon which to tread. The 
Bible critic of to-day must know not only the modern and 
classical languages and Hebrew, but he must also be con- 
versant with Assyrian, Arabic, Syriac, and Ethiopic, so as 
to compare the ancient versions intelligently. In the Poly- 
chrome Bible reference is made not only to the Vulgate 
and Septuagint, but also to the Peshita (Syriac), the Tar- 
gum (Aramaic), the Samaritan, and the various recensions 
of Jerome, Aquila, Symmaehos, etc. 

After this digression it is not difficult to grasp the mag- 
nitude of the labor entailed by the issuance of a work 
which was to sum up all the investigations, concerning the 
Old Testament, of ancient and modern times. The general 
editor wished to present this summary in such a shape 
that "he who runs may read." It would be invaluable to 
the scholars, but it must also be intelligible to the ordi- 
ordinary reader of but little culture. To this end he de- 
vised a special plan of publication, remarkable for sim- 
plicity and effectiveness. Since the time and conditions of 
composition bear so important a relation to these writings, 
forming their actual background, he determined to indi- 
cate the various periods and authors by printing the text 
and the translation upon backgrounds of different colors. 



OXE does not require personal acquaintance with the 
artist, to be an enthusiastic admirer of Mr. Sydney J. 
Yard's paintings. To look at them is to wish for them — 
almost to need them. To step from the clattering street 
into a quiet gallery containing a sunset study of his 
thoughtful genius, is to forget all but pleasant, twilight 
reverie, with sometimes a tinge of retrospective sadness, 

Ami his sheep! Sydney J. Yard and Ernest C. Peixotto 
have both entered into the spirit of the sheep-fold, heart 
and soul. The reference to Mr. Peixotto's work applies 
more especially to his pen-ami ink illustrations, and they 
always suggest the pastures of France. But the other 
artist's fleece-bearers, flocked or singly, are so purely 
suggestive of California fields and roadways, that their in- 
dividuality marks them for our own. 

Mr. Yard appreciates animals, judging from the hay lie 
puts into his pictures. It is of a quality and color to coax 
appreciative "nickers" from any equine or bovine critic of 
harvest hay-stacks. 

This artist employs water-colors exclusively, in bis 
portrayals of California scenery. There is something about 
the orange and dreamy purple of bis low sunsets that is all 
his own, and he has the most unapproachable way of diffus- 
ing a twilight atmosphere through a landscape. 

At the Hopkin's Gallery there are now on exhibition 
three of Mr. Yard's most characteristic paintings— sheep 
wandering among their warm shadows — glorified sunsets 
— and all the other rarities of this kindly artist's talent. 
Those who see them will not forget, but retain for many a 
day the impression of the unusual tenderness of the tones 
in the pictures. 

Ayres' Business College. 325 Montgomery. Individual Instruction, 
shorthand, typewriting, bookkeeping, telegraphy; life scholarship, $50; 
tow rates per week and month; day; evening. Send for catalogue. 



Macbeth makes half the 
lamp-chimneys ; and half the 
dealers won't sell 'em, be- 
cause they don't break. 

Get the Index — free. 

Write Macbeth Pittsburgh Pa 



CITY INDEX AND PURCHASER'S GUIDE 

RESTAURANTS. 
Bergez's Restaurant, Academy Building, 332-334 Pine street, below Mont- 
gomery. Rooms for ladies and families; private entrance. John Bergez 
Proprietor. 
Malson Tortoni, French Rotisserle, 111 O'Farrell street. Private dining 

rooms and banquet ball. S. Constantlni, Proprietor. 
Poodle Dog Restaurant, S. E. cor. Grant ave. and Busb st Private 

dining and banquet rooms, Tel. 429. A. B Blanco & B Bkun 

Bay State Oyster House and Grill Room, 15 Stockton street and 109 
O'Farrel street. N. M. Adler prletor Telephone Main 5057. 

MEDICAL. 

Dr. Hall, 14 McAllister St. . near Jones Diseases of women and children. 

POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS. 
Hawaiian stamps a specialty. MAKINS & CO 500 Market street. 
Selections on approval : any place in world. W. P. GREANY, 827 Brannan 
The W. H. Holds Stamp Co., (Incorporated), 105 O'Farrell St., S. F. 

BOILER MAKERS. 
P. F. Oundon's San Francisco Iron Works, 314, 316, and 318 Main street. 
Iron Work of every description designed and constructed. 

San Francisco and North Pacific R'y Co. 



SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. TIBDBOH FIRRY- Foot ol Market Street. 
WEEK DAYS— 7:30, 9:00, 11:00 AH; 12:35, 3:30 5:10. 9:30 P M. Thursdays- 
Extra trip at 11:30 p m. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1:50 and 11 :30 P H. 
SUNDAYS— 8:00,8:30. 11:00 A M; 1:30 3:30, 5JJU.8:J0pm. 

SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO. 
WEEK DAYS— «: 10, 7:50, 9:30, 11:10 AH; 12:45, 3:40, 5:10 PM. Saturdays- 
Extra trips at 1 :55 and 6 :35 p H. 



SUNDAYS— 8:10, 9:40, 11:10 AH; 1 :40, 3:40, 5:00, «:25 P H. 
Between San Francisco and Scbuetzen Park, same schedule 


as above. 


Lea vi 


S. F. 


In Effect Oct. 24, 1897 


Arrive in S. F. 


Week Days. 


Sundays. 

8:00am 
9:30am 
5:00pm 


DESTINATION. 


Sundays 1 Week Days 


7:90AM 

3:30PH 
6:10 PH 


Novato, 
Petaluma, 
Santa Rosa. 


10:40am 1 8:40 AH 
8:10 PH | 10:25 AH 
7 :85 P H I 8 :22 p M 




8:00 AH 


Fulton, Windsor, 

Healdsburg. 
Geyservllle, Cloverdale 






7:30 am 
8:30 PH 


7:85 PH 


8:9 p h 



7:30 am 


1 8:00 AH | 


Hopland, TJklah 


I 7:35pm 


I 6:22 PH 


7:80a h 
3:30pm 


1 8:00AH 1 


OuernevlUe. 


| 7:35PH 


10:26 A H 

8:22 P H 


7:30 AH 
5:10pm 


1 8:00am I 
1 5:00pm 1 


Sonoma, 
Glen Ellen. 


I 10:40 a h 
1 8:10PM 


8:40 A H 
6:22 P H 


7:30am 
3:30pm 


1 8:00am I 
I 5:00pm 1 


Sebastopol. 


1 10:40am 
I 7:35PM 


10:26 A H 
6:22 P M 



Taa Press Clipping Bureau. 510 Montgomer? street, S F. reads all 
papers on the Pacific Coast, and supplies ollppirgson all topics. business 
and personal. 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West Springs; at Geyservllle 
for Skaggs' Springs; at Cloverdale for the Geysers; at Hopland for High- 
land Springs, Kelseyville, Soda Bay, Lakeport, and Bartlett Springs; at 
Ukiah, for Vichy Springs, Saratoga Springs, Blue Lakes, Laurel Del 
Lake. Upper Lake, Pomo, Potter Valley, John Day's, Riverside, Lier- 
ley's, Bucknell's Sashedoin Heights, Hullville, Boonevllle, Orr*8 Hot 
Springs, Mendocino City. Ft. Bragg. Westport, Usal. 

Saturday-to-Monday Round Trip Tickets at reduced rates. On Sundays, 
Round Trip Tickets to all points beyond San Rafael at half rates. 

TICKET OFFICE— 650 Market St., Chronicle Building. 
A.W.FOSTER, Pres.& Gen. Manager. R. X. RYAN, Gen. Pass. Age nt 

Occidental and Oriental Steamship Co. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Steamers leave wharf. FIRST and BRANNAN STREETS, at 1 P m., for 

YOKOHAMA AND HONGKONG, 

calling at tvube (Htoco), Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting at 

Hongkong with steamers for India, etc. No cargo received on board on 

day of sailing. 

Belgic (via Honolulu) Saturday. January 15, 1808 

Coptic .Thursday. Februarys, 1888 

Gaelic (via Honolulu) Tuesday, February 23, 1898 

Doric (via Honolulu) Saturday, March 13, 1898 

Round TRrp Tickets at Reduced Rates. 

For freight or passage apply at Company's Office, No. 421 Market street, 
corner First. D. D. STUBBS, Secretary. 

S S "Australia", for Honolulu only, Tuesday 

January 25. 1898, at 2 p h 

S. S. "Alameda," Thursday, February 3, 18P8. 

Line to Coolgardie, Australia, and Capetown 

South Africa. 

J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS CO.. 
{SHIKUM!* Agents, 114 Montgomery St. Freight office, '.23 
tgiiipuiuq Market St., San Francisco. 



EANIC 




January 15, 1898. 



SAX 1RANCISC0 NEWS LKTTKR. 



23 



PERSONALIS. 



The life of an actor is not always a happy one. Mme. 

Sarah Bernhardt is worried by the ceaseless watch she is 
obliged to keep against vitriol-throwers, one of whom she 
succeeded in getting into au asylum; and now we hear that 
.Mme. Jane Hading has been sold out. At the sale of her 
jewels, we are told, her lap dog's collar, studded with dia- 
monds, fetched $1000: a dog collar, with superb pearl and 
diamond pendants, was sold for $7000, and a pearl neck- 
lace was auctioned off for $9000 

Emperor William has been rebuked by the members 

of the synod of the Lutheran church for the province of 
East Prussia for going bunting on Sunday and feasting, 
with his guests, after the day's sport with guns. The war 
lord's examjjle in this instance is particularly grievous to 
the synod members because of a recent proclamation by 
the governors of several provinces reprobating the grow- 
ing disregard of the holy day. 

Rousseau's tomb at Ermenonville was recently 

taken to pieces in order to have the carving touched up. 
It was found that the space within the tomb was too small 
ever to have contained a coffin. Rousseau's remains were 
conveyed to the Pantheon during the French revolution, 
but it was believed had been later replaced in the tomb. 
The question now is, "Where is Rousseau's coffin?" 

Mme. Adelina Patti has arranged to sing in April 

in Christiania, Stockholm, and Copenhagen. Her fee for 
each evening's concert will be $2,775— less by several hun- 
dred dollars than she is said tohave received in New York, 
but quite enough to keep the wolf from her castle door. 

King Oscar of Sweden resembles Mr. Gladstone in 

his ability as a tree-chopper. Sweden is distinguished for 
its splendid pine trees, and nothing delights its ruler more 
than to go into the forests, ax in hand, and spend a whole 
day leveling some giant of the woods to the ground. 

A bust of Charles Stewart Parnell has just been 

added to the National Portrait Gallery, London. It is the 
work of Miss Mary Grant, and was hung in the great Brit- 
ish gallery of celebrities on the sixth anniversary of the 
death of the great Irish leader. 

The Mikado, of Japan, though passionately fond of 

horse-racing, allows no betting on his track, and pursues 
the sport for sport's sake. He has agents now in this 
country looking for twenty first-class horses for the Im- 
perial stables. 

Captain H. G. Bates of the American Volunteers — 

Ballington Booth's Salvation Army — was a bugler in the 
army during the war, and it is said blew the rally and the 
charge at the end of Sheridan's famous twenty-mile ride. 

General Booth, who has gone to Berlin to open a 

vigorous campaign in behalf of the Salvation Army, ex- 
pects to enlist as many men as the German Emperor has 
in the Imperial army. 

Mr. Walter Burns, manager of the banking house 

of J. S. Morgan & Co. in London, died of heart failure on 
Tuesday at his country seat near London. He had been 
ill for two months. 



THE death of Abraham E. Hecht, of the well-known 
firm of Hecht Bros. , of this city, removes a man who 
for many years had been prominent in business circles of 
San Francisco. Mr. Hecht was nearly sixty years old, 
having been born in Germany in 1838. He was noted for 
his public spirit and great generosity. His death is deeply 
regretted, and is a loss to the community where he lived 
for many years. 

WE have some hope of the tramp. The other day we 
rented a tramp to wash our dog. He didn't wash 
the dog, but he stole the soap. Since the association, the 
dog has smelt like a four-legged essence of poverty: a 
quadrupedal extract of anti-immersionist. 



Oall at Rosekrjns & Co , No. 342 Sutter street, and inspect their 
' Crowa Incandescent Gas Burner." This burner has.no equal, giv- 
ing the most light at the smallest cost oE any other gas-burner. 
These gentlemen supply mantles for all gas-burners. 



Southern Pacific Co.--Paclfic System. 

Trains Leave and are Duo to Arrive at SAN FRANCISCO: 
(Main Line. Foot of Market Stroot.) 



Leave. I 
•« 

7 
7 
7 
7 
8 



/•'nun ./. 



I Arrive 



:0OA Niles, San Jose, and way stations *i:45A 

:0O A Bcnicia Suisun, and Sacramento 10:45 A 

:00 a Marysvllle. Oroville. and Redding, via Woodland 5:46 p 

:00 A Vacavllle and Rumsey 8:45P 

:S0 A Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, Napa, Galistoga, Santa Rosa 6 :16 P 

:00 A Atlantic Express, Ogden and East 8:45p 

:30 a NUes, San Jose, Stookton, lone, Sacramento, Marysvllle, 

Chico, Tehama, and Red Bluff 4:15P 

:30A Peters, Mllton.and Oakdale «7:15P 

:00A New Orleans Express, Merced, Raymond, Fresno, Bakers- 
field, Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, Doming, El Paso, New 

Orleans, and East 6:45 P 

:00 A Vallejo, Martinez, Merced, and Fresno 12:15 p 

:00p Sacramento River steamers *9:00P 

:00p NUes. San Jose, and Way Stations }9:15 A 

:80 P Martinez and Way Stations 7:45 p 

:00 P Livermore, Mendota, Hanford, and Vlsalia 4:15 p 

Livermore. San Jose, Niles and Way Stations J10:15a 

:00 P Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, Napa, Calistoga, El Verano 

and Santa Rosa 9:15a 

:00 P Benlcla, Vacavllle, Woodland, Knight's Landing, Marys- 
vllle, Oroville, and Sacramento 10:45 A 

:30p Niles, San Jose, Traoy, and Stockton 7:15 P 

:30 P Lathrop, Modesto, Merced, Berenda, Fresno, Mojave (for 

Randsburg), Santa Barbara and Los Angeles 7:45 A 

■SO p Santa Fe Route, Atlantic Express, for Mojave and East 6:45P 

:30 p " Sunset Limited." Los Angeles, El Paso, Fort Worth, Lit- 
tle Rock, St. Louis, Chicago, and East H10:15A 

:30P "Sunset Limited Annex," El Paso, New Orleans, and East glO-15A 

:00P European mail, Ogden and East '. 9:45 A 

:00p Haywards, Niles and San Jose 7:45A 

•■OOP Vallejo f7:45P 

:00p Oregon Express, Sacramento, Marysvllle, Redding, Port- 
land, Puget Sound and East 8:15A 



San Leandeo ahd Ha ywaeds Local. (Foot ol Market St.) 


i*6:00 AT 


MELR08B, 


f 7:15 A 


8:00 A 


Semihaey Park, 


3*9:45 A 


9:00a 


FITCHBTTRG, 


10:45 A 


10:00 A 


Elmetjrst, 


11:45 A 


til .00 A 


San Leandeo. 


12:45 P 


(12:00 H 


South San Leandeo, 


(1:45 P 




Estudillo, 


12:45 p 


£3:00 P 


Lorenzo, 


24:45 p 


4:00 P 


Cheery, 


«5:45 P 


5:00 p 


and 


6:15 P 


5:30 p 


Haywards. 


7:45 P 


7:00 p 




8:45 P 


8:00 p 


i Runs through to Niles. 


9:46 P 


9:00 P 


/■ From Niles . 


10:50 P 


ttll:15 P 


Ittl2:00 P 



Coast Division (Narrow Gauge). (Foot of Market St.) 

8 :15 A Newark, Centerville, San Jose, Felton, Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruz and way stations 5 :50 r 

*2:15 p Newark, Centerville, San Jose. New Almaden, Felton, Boul- 
der Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal way stations *10:5ua 

4 :15 p Newark, San Jose and Los G afcos 9 :20 <* 

tll:45P Hunters' Excursion, San Jose and Way Stations J7:20p 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 

From San Francisco— Foot of Market street (Slip 8).— *7:15, 9:00, and 
11:00 A.M., 11:00, *2:00, 13:00. *4:00,J5:00 and *6:00p. m. 

From Oakland— Foot of Broadway.— *6:00, 8:00, 10:00 a. m.; {18:00, *1:00, 
t2:Q0,*3:00, 14:00 *5:Q0p. m. 

Coast Division (Broad Gauge). (Third and Townsend streets). 

6:55 A 
9:00 A 



15 E 

00A 
■35 A 



40 A 

00 A 



San Jose and way stations (New Almaden Wednesdays only) fl 
San Jose, Tres Finos, Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove, Paso Robles 
San Luis Obispo, Guadalupe, Surf and prinoipalway stations 4 

10 :40 A San Jose and way stations *8 

11:30 A San Jose and w&y stations , 8 

*2:30p San Mateo, Redwood, Menlo Park, Santa Clara, San Jose, 
Gilroy, Hollister, Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, Paoiflc 

Grove i ;*10: 

•3:15 p San Jose and Principal Way Stations... *9 

•4 :15 p San Jose and Principal Way Stations 9 :4a a 

*5:00p San Jose and Principal Way Stations 1:80 p- 

5 :30p San Jose and principal way stations 5:30p 

6 :30 p San Jose and way stations 7 :20 p 

til :45p San Jose and way stations 7:23 p 

A for Morning. P for Afternoon. *Sundays excepted. fSaturdays only. 

ISunday s only . tt Monday , Thursday, and Saturday nights only . 

^Mondays and Thursdays. ^Wednesdays and Saturdays. 

The Pacific Transfer Company will oall for and oheek baggage from 
hotels and residences. Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time Cards and 
other information. 

Pacific Coast Steamship Co. 

Steamers leave Broadway Wharf, San Francisco for ports in Alaska, 
9 A. m., January 1. 6, 11, 16, 31, 36 31, and every 5th day thereafter. 

For British Columbia and Puget Sound ports, 9 a. m.. January 1, 
6, 11, 16, 21, 26, 31, and every 5th day thereafter. 

For Eureka (Humboldt Bay), Steamer '' Pomona," 2 p. m., January 
1,5, 10, 14, 18, 23, 26, 31. February 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 35, 29. 

For Newport, (Los Angeles) and all way ports, 9 a. m. ; January 1,5, 
9, 13, 19, 21, 25, 29 and every fourth day thereafter. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Port Harford Santa Barbara. Port Los 
Angeles, Redondo, (Los Angeles) 11 A. m., January 3, 7, it, 15, 17, 23, 27, 
31, and every fourth day thereafter. 

For ports in Mexico, 10 A. m., January 6, and 2d of each month thereafter. 
The company reserves' the right to change, without previous notice, 
steamers, sailing dates', and hours of sailing . 

TICKET OFFICE— Palaee Hotel, No.,4 New Montgomery street. 

GOODALL. PERKINS & CO., Gen. Agts., 10 Market St., San Francisco 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 15, 1898. 



HOME DECORATION- 

THE end and aim of intelligent framing should be to 
make the picture look ils best; and yet, within the 
limits indicated, much tasteful variety can be had. 

The frame for an oil-painting can hardly be made too 
rich or too ornate, because the color in the picture will 
still dominate the whole. But an etching or engraving, 
being a picture in simple black and white, or brown aod 
white, would beoverwtightedand "killed" by a frame tco 
showy or too heavy. 

A delicate landscape looks best in a simple, narrow 
frame of good material. A figure piece will bear a more 
decorative style; while a portrait or a single head gener- 
ally requires a still broader and richer setting. 

Water colors look best in a style of frame intermediate 
between the richness suitable for an oil painting and the 
simplicity which best suits an etching. Unlike pictures 
in oil, a water color should always be covered with glass, 
and be protected by a "mat," or paue-parlout. This mat 
may either be of gold or of rough drawing paper of a 
neutral tone. 

Portraits in photography will bear large and ornate 
frames, and large photographs from paintings often look 
best in broad, flat frames of wood, and without any "mat" 
or other surrounding margin. 

The bedroom should be cool-looking in summer, and 
bright and cheerful in winter. The walls can be hung 
with one of the numerous flowered patterns of paper, 
many of which, iu good design and color, are the cheap 
things easiest to be found — cheap enough to meet the 
purse of the most needy. The ceiling should be plain 
with such a flowered wall. The so-called borders and 
ceiiing-papers, each a variation of the wall, but serve to 
confuse and irritate the sight, and are an abomination to 
be avoided everywhere aid all the time. 

A more unusual plan, but most effective, is to use plain 
cartridge paper of some cheerful hue on the walls, and 
overhead and part way down — to the 
picture molding if there be one — a 
heavy pattern of bright flowers and 
leaves. This gives to such a room 
the aspect of a bower of flowers, 
while leaving for the walls the best of 
backgrounds for the setting forth of 
pictures. The paper-hangers look 
aghast at this; but being mostly 
Scandinavian peasants, their dictum 
as to matters pertaining to the arts 
should not be given undue weight. 
For those who like the quaint and 
snug effect of ceilings rather low, and 
yet who crave the airiness which 
comes with higher joists, this latter 
makes a happy compromise. The 
heavy pattern on the ceiling pro- 
duces a low effect. 

To clean plaster casts is generally 
very unsatisfactory. The yellow 
spots are the hardest to remove. 
These are caused by iron in the 
gypsum. When plaster casts are 
new is the time to prevent this forma- 
tion. This is done by hardening the 
surface, which is a very simple pro- 
cess. Make a hot saturated solution 
of borax and apply to the cast with a 
brubh. Two or three applications 
will generally be sufficient, yet some- 
times rive and six may be necessary. 
Next apply hot a saturated solution of 
chloride of barium (two coats); after 
this two or three applications of soap 
and water. Rinse off thoroughly in 
clean water, or until the water forms 
beads upon the surface of the cast. 
To further whiten, apply flake-white 
rubbed up in gum water, using a wide 
camel's-hair brush. 



jOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOflOOOj 

1 ANDY CATHARTIC 



CURE CONSTIPATION 



50c. 



Constipation Afflicts 

part of the people all the time, 
all the people part of the time. 
Are you a chronic or occasional sufferer from constipation ? < 
Do you want a sure, pure cure ? 

CASCARETS (eat 'em Kfce candy) will stimulate 
your liver, regulate your bowels, leave your 1 
blood clean and rich, sweeten your breath and ] 
make your stomach do its work. 

CASCARETS kill disease germs, cure 

sick headache, taste good and do good, please 
the children, destroy and drive off worms and 1 
other parasites. 

A 10c box will prove their merit, and put you on I 
the right road to perfect and permanent health. Try [ 
a ioc box to-day I If not pleased, get your money 
back. Larger boxes, 25c or 50c. 

BOOKLET AND {' ^^l|^^"^Htf$ j ADDRESS 

™ I |o^Ce T n h u1ne.S lerlin g Rem(l,, ' Co -: 
for the H I Beware of Chicago or 

asking i^BBB^ imitations! I new york. 255 

b 000<>0-0-CK>0<>CK>C> 0-CK«><><><X><><><><XXKK><><K><><>0<><>0 



Protection to Purchasers 




We caution the public against purchasing imitations of obsolete forms 
of our macnincs. Wc keep up with the latest developments in the art, 
making nothing but the highest grade of product, and have achieved 
unqualified success in its sale ; hence manv attempts at imitation, and the 
illegal use of our trade name. 

A Brass Medallinn, of the elliptical form shown above, bears our regis- 
tered trade-mark, and is placed upon the head of every machine made by us. 



NONE GENUINE WITHOUT IT. 



The 



SINGER SEWING-MACHINES ARE SOLD ONLY BY 

Sincer Manufacturing 

OFFICES IN EVERY CITY IN THE WORLD. 



CO. 



Price per Copy. 10 Cents. 



Annual Subscription, $4.00 








<&ulif mxX%»b& xtx sjer. 




Vol. IV 1. 



SAN FRANCISCO, JANUARY 22, 189S 



Number 4. 



Prin'edand Published every Saturday by the proprietor. FRED HARRIOTT. 
6ti Kearny etreet, San Francisco. Entered at San Francisco Post- 
office a* Second-elate Matter. 

The office of the NEWS LETTER in New York City is at Temple Court; 
and at Chicago, 903 Boyce Building. (Frank E Morrison, Eastern 
Representative), where information maybe obtained regarding subscrip- 
tion and advertising rates. 



THE State Board of Health has declared that the City 
and County Hospital of San Francisco and the Twenty- 
sixth street hospital are unfit for human habitation, and 
should be abolished. The State Board of Health knows 
its business. 

THE army is evidently much in favor of annexing the 
Hawaiian Islands, if one may judge from the very 
warm welcome that was extended to President Dole by 
the Department here. But the Army is in a hopeless 
minority when it comes to ballots, no matter however 
potent it may be io the matter of bullets. 

TT is understood that a direct line of steamers between 
[ San Francisco and Dyea will be put on immediatelv. 
This fact should be extensively advertised, as at present 
the belief prevails at the East that all vessels sailing from 
this city stop at Seattle. San Francisco should navigate 
its own Alaskan canoe, and ought to let the world know 
it right soon, if passengers are wanted. 

UNDER the encouraging protective tariff of the Super- 
visors, boxing clubs are springing up with alarming 
frequency. There are now three bands of bruisers in the 
field, and others are talked of. Evidently the details for 
these refined exhibitions have been definitely settled, and 
the contests will proceed without annoyance from the au- 
thorities. Home industry is evidently one of the strong 
cards of the present city government. 

THE Chinese situation is growing decidedly interesting; 
and a clash between Germany, France, and Russia on 
one side, and England and Japan on the other, appears to 
be imminent. The fact cannot be denied that England has 
determined to protect her future commercial interests in 
China at all hazards; and that she will have the eager 
co-operation of Japan is equally true. England sometimes 
plays a game of bluff, but there is no bluff in the present 
situation. 

THE bitter and unanimous attack of the daily papers 
upon the Devany order taxing advertising boards 
and other street obstructions, results from the fact that 
the daily papers are the chief offenders. They naturally 
resent being "called down," and hope to drag enough of 
the mercantile community into the fight to defeat the 
measure. In the interests of justice and municipal good 
name the Supervisors should make the Devany order (with 
some modifications) a law, and enforce it promptly. 



« POLICEMAN was knocked down last Tuesday by a 
vehicle while he was escorting two ladies across the 
street. The offender was instantly arrested and locked 
up. Had the victim been a private citizen, he would have 
escaped the annoyance of imprisonment and fine. A great 
many inoffensive pedestrians have gone down before the 
notoriously reckless Jehus of the city, and not one time in 
a hundred have the wagoneers been troubled. No doubt 
hereafter they will be careful to run over and maim only 
the peaceably* disposed tax-payer. 



SAN Mateo County is to have an election for the pur- 
pose of voting $10,000 for good roads, the money to be 
expended on a partof a general system to be adopted. Ma- 
sonry is to supplant wood for culverts, the roadways are to 
be forty feet wide, and eighteen feet to be laid in macadam. 
The contemplated work is most commendable. Good roads 
are of the very first importance in any community, and 
as California has very few such highways, the State de- 
partment for road building will have abundant opportun- 
ity to do more than draw salaries for the next ten years. 

TO the executive committee of the California Jubilee is 
due a great deal of credit for the work accomplished. 
The members of the committee have given their money, 
their time and indefatigable efforts to make next week's 
celebration a success in every way. Tbey have gotten up 
a number of floats that are exceptionally artistic in de- 
sign, and have taken an enthusiastic and unflagging inter- 
est in the semi-centennial. They have devoted patient 
labor to the detail work of the celebration, and to them will 
be largely due the worthy commemoration of the fiftieth 
anniversary of the greatest event in the history of the State. 



THE Postoffice department at Washington has sent 
out a suggestion that the force of carriers in this 
city can be reduced, and places the cut at thirty, or 
about one-seventh of the regular payroll employed in 
the delivery department. The answer to this preposter- 
ous interrogation should be both prompt and positive. 
San Francisco cannot allow a reduction by so much as a 
single employee without crippling this important service. 
The carriers in the city are over-worked now, the num- 
ber of deliveries in the business district less than enjoyed 
by any place of equal importance East, which is also true 
of the residence portion of the city. New York has nine 
deliveries down town to San Francisco's five, and in the 
suburban districts the ratio is quite as disproportionate. 
To cut the force from 207 to 177 would cripple the service 
beyond endurance. It would decrease the delivery through- 
out the entire city, and is not to be entertained for a mo- 
ment. If the government is short of funds let it cut out 
anywhere from fifteen to twenty fraudulent millions from 
the pension rolls, but we cannot allow the delivery of our 
mails to be disturbed by so much as a two-cent postage 
stamp. 

ON Thursday, at the Cramp's Philadelphia shipyard, 
the Japanese warship " Kasagi " was launched. 
To-day at ten o'clock the Japanese unarmored cruiser 
" Chitose " is to be launched from the Union Iron Works 
shipyard. The "Kasagi" has a greater displacement 
than the "Chitose," but is not so long, nor has she equal 
breadth of beam. The contract for these two vessels calls 
for a maximum speed of 22} knots. It will be interesting 
to note the trials of these warships — one the highest type 
of the shipbuilders' art on the Pacific Coast, the other con- 
structed by the largest yard in the East. Thus far the 
Scotts have been able to more than hold their own in 
building warships, and have earned fortunes by the excess 
of speed they have been able to put into the vessels that 
have left their yard. The Japanese have war machines 
building in England, France, and Germany, and within the 
next three years will rank fifth in the order of naval 
strength. It is safe to say that the vessel built by San 
Francisco skill and enterprise will be the equal of any ship 
that is to be built for the ambitious Japanese people. It 
would not be a bad guess to say that the first gun to dis- 
turb the peace of the world will be fired from the deck of 
a Japanese war vessel. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 22, 1898. 



THE PEOPLE ARE BEING MISLED. 

THE protest by merchants against the proposed ordi- 
nance imposing municipal licenses for certain privil- 
eges enjoyed by tax-payers who use the city's property 
for increasing their private revenues without paying for 
them, arises in a large measure from a misapprehension 
of the facts. The daily papers, with a desire to avoid pay- 
ing for the use of property that belongs to the people, 
have beclouded the merits of Supervisor Devany's order, 
and are endeavoring to create a public opinion against the 
measure, and so defeat it. The intent of the proposed or- 
dinance should be endorsed by the merchants, of all men: 
for it would not be possible to find a single man doing 
business in this city who is not now paying heavy rental 
and his full share of taxation necessary to conduct the 
city Government. He is already paying his lessor for the 
space beneath the sidewalks. The cost of preparing such 
space is a pa r t of the investment made by the owner of 
the building occupied by him, and he pays rent according 
to location and such investment. The lessor, however, 
pays the city nothing for the use of its property, which he 
has appropriated to his own use, and for which he regu- 
larly collects his rental. In Eastern cities, notably in New 
York, the city collects charges of 7 cents per foot for the 
use of its property that lies beneath the sidewalks. Tn 
European cities the same custom prevails. Why should 
it not apply with equal justice in San Francisco ? To 
the extent of their holdings, the merchants, the occu- 
pants of these business buildings, are stockholders in the 
municipal corporation, and are entitled to their share of 
whatever revenues it may obtain from any and all sources. 
This share comes in the form of reduced taxation for the 
municipal utilities enjoyed by them. Why should property 
owners become a privileged class, improve the city's land, 
and charge them rental thereon. As a matter of right, if 
it be unfair to tax the property owner for the use of 
twenty feet of the street, it would be just to allow him to 
excavate fifty feet in f ion t of his lot, make underground 
floor space, and tax his tenants for its use. We do not 
believe any one will contend that the entire street should 
be so occupied without the owner of the property, that is, 
the city, being paid something for its use. That this con- 
clusion is sound in law and fact is established by its gen- 
eral acceptance in Eastern and European cities. 

The order provides that property-owners shall pay for 
sidewalk space used as stairways in reaching the base- 
ments of their buildings. Is there anything unfair about ! 
this? The sidewalks are the property of the people; > 
when any citizen appropriates their property for his own ! 
personal gain, should he not pay for it? Take the beer 
balls, wine cellars, lunch counters, and other classes of 
business that occupy the basements about the city. Without 
exception the owner who collects his rents with clock-like 
regularity, has taken a part of the people's street to make 
the place valuable. By using a part of the ground floor 
of his building he could get a downstairs entrance; but 
that would take valuable space from his tenant above- 
cellar and reduce his income, so he takes what he wants 
from you and I, and every other taxpayer in the city. 
the use of our property andpays us nothing for it. Where 
lies the injustice in making him pay for a continuous and 
valuable consideration? The fact that these privileges, 
representing thousands of dollars every month in the year, ! 
have been appropriated by landlords without any return, 
does not constitute a plea for their continuance. 

The order strikes at a crying nuisance, and a menace to 1 
life, when it proposes to tax street sign-boards. And 
here again is where the daily press is deeply interested. 
The Merchants' Association some years ago took up the 
signboard nuisance, and found the' dailies were all against 
the movement. They had thousands of dollars invested in 
boards that were scattered from North Beach to the 
Potrero. These boards help to sell the newspapers. But 
are the taxpayers interested in the sale of the Chronicle, 
the Call or the Examiner? The boards are obstructions; 
they are not beautiful, and they should disappear. If they 
were abolished the way would be clea r for a general sweep; 
but it would be impracticable to leave the newspaper ob- 
structions, and remove others Telegraph and telephone 
poles, projecting signs, and advertising posts that offend 
the eye and are an imposition upon an easy-going public 



should come down. Devany's order puts a tax on the 
advertising devices. If i.'.en desire to advertise their trade 
or their wares by unsightly projections and sidewalk- 
obstructions, let them pay for it. If the privileges are 
valuable they should be paid for; if not, there will follow no 
loss in abolishing them. The principle of Devany's order 
is 90und. It certainly has imperfections. Perhaps the 
scale of rates are a little too high, but in the main the pro- 
posed ordinance is just. The attack upon it comes from 
the newspapers, who skillfully attempt to hide their own 
selfish ends behind the thin claim that it is an imposition 
upon trade and is an unjust tax on the commerce of the 
city. A careful study of Devany's order disproves this 
claim from top to bottom. The News Letter notes with 
pleasure that the order which the daily press is trying to 
discredit and defeat was passed to prim by an unanimous 
vote; and we hope that the Supervisors will statid by their 
guns, make it a law, and then compel its faithful enforce- 
ment. 

Where Was Some of the daily papers, intent upon creat- 
tne Insult? ing a sensation, declared that Mr. Sanford 
B. Dole, President of the Hawaiian Repub- 
lic, was treated with discourtesy on his arrival in the city 
last Monday. This incivility consisted of his not being re- 
ceived by a salute from the forts. This on the face of it 
looks absurd. Mr. Dole comes here as a plain citizen, and 
was once a citizen of this country, to interest our Govern- 
ment in taking over the Islands. He does not come as the 
accredited ruler of a nation on a ceremonial visit. If we 
are a Republic, let us be democratic in our ways. We are 
not copying other nations in their formalities. Instead of 
this, we are careful to impress upon foreign nations that 
we affect a Jeffersonian simplicity by the poor salaries we 
pay our ministers, and we do not even give them an official 
uniform. Why, then, should we begin to fire great guns 
and put on the outward show of royalty when plain Mr. 
Do'e comes to us on an errand which looks remarkably like 
a begging one, and which he naively tells us does not meet 
with the approval of the aborigines — but only of the whites, 
and therefore strangers. As far as can be learned, Mr. 
Dole was treated with distinct courtesy. A very pretty 
lieutenant of the army boarded the steamship and tendered 
General Shafter's compliments and desire to call. The 
same lieutenant told Mr. Dole that the whole army — noise, 
artillery, and foot — were in sympathy with Mr. Dole, and 
hoped he would succeed in his mission. It was all very 
nicely and kindly put, and Mr. Dole should feel extremely 
flattered that so influential and so highly respectable a 
body as the American army is in sympathy with him. When 
King Kalakau came there was a general ovation — but it 
is known that the ovation was carefully planned by a few 
rich men who had large property interests in the Islands, 
and who wished to commend themselves to him. But the 
majority of the people laughed, and by no means gave 
their hearty co-operation in honoring his sable majesty. 

Jubilee The News Letteh has no disposition to 
Decorations, cavil over small things or find fault with 
private citizens who, through a sense of 
civic pride, undertake the thankless task of engineering 
public demonstrations. The gentlemen who have charge 
of the decorations now to be seen about the city, are with- 
out doubt doing the best that they car. under the circum- 
stances. The funds at their disposal were limited, and 
they were unable to aceomplisb all they may have desired. 
But one cannot help thinking that the money devoted to the 
purpose of beautifying the city and putting on holiday 
clothes for the fitting celebration of the Golden Jubilee and 
the welcome of our invited guests— of whom may there be 
many — hasjbeen largely wasted. To our mind there are 
few things more trivial and less in accord with an impor- 
tant event than the stringing of little bits of colored cloth 
overhead and across the streets. It has one recommend- 
ation, and that is cheapness. It carries the fact of its un- 
worth and petty quality to the mind of everyone who sees 
it. The little variegated squares of coloring, with bears 
scattered here and there in all poses and conditions of life, 
are amusing and foolish. The effort to commemorate the 
Golden Jubilee by the display of quarantine colors, is an 
unfortunate one. These little, idly-flapping strings of 
cloth remind one of anything but a serious and consistent 



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January 22. 1898. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS I.KTTKR 



effort at harmonious decoration. As an advertisement of 
smalt means and smaller ideas, and primitive boyish follies, 
they haoK out with irritating persistence. Tangled, 
bedraggled by moisture, and flippantly insistent, they are 
a mortifying evidence of misdirected ta>te. 

The occasion is an unusual one, and the decorations 
should in some measure be in keeping with it. The tangle 
of streamers and the arch should have given way for once 
to something original and striking. The arch may be a very 
beautiful piece of work, but it is a waste of money to expend 
fifteen hundred dollars in a single effort, and on something 
that must be within a stone's throw of one to be appre- 
ciated. Notwithstanding this fact it might be accepted; 
but the decorations otherwise are simply sickening. We 
ask our neighbors to join us in a celebration of the Golden 
Jubilee, and go forth to greet and extend them welcome 
with a waving ocean of insignificant toy flags; a little bet- 
ter than a burlesque, and a good deal worse than a rural 
picnic. 

It is fortunate and worthy of all commendation that the 
parade will be an honor to the city. Handsome floats of 
poetic and significant design have been prepared, and the 
whole history of gold discover}' in California and the de- 
velopment of mining interests of the State, from the days 
of Marshall down to the present time, will be splendidly 
portrayed. These allegorical pictures will tell the story 
of a vast industry in a language that cannot fail to excite 
the admiration of all who see them, will be worthy of the 
occasion they commemorate, and will, we hope, make up 
in some degree for the ludicrous effort the city has made 
toward a proper decoration in honor of the semi-centennial 
of the discovery of gold in California. 

China and The absorption of China does not progress so 
Jingoism, rapidly as the press would have once led us 
to believe. There seems to be a very great 
lull in the affairs over there, and this cessation of acquir- 
ing territory seems to have been brought about by the 
great fear that the Powers entertain of each other. Ger- 
many will no doubt not relinquish her hold on the terri- 
tory which she has stolen, but the other nations seem to 
be hesitating about parceling out the Flowery Kingdom 
between them. The only result of this sudden desire to 
enrich themselves at the expense of a weak nation will be 
an increased taxation in Germany for war purposes. Eng- 
land already views with alarm the Emperor's desire to 
possess a navy, and because the Germans have built an 
extra ship or two, the whole press of England is agitated 
with a profound fear, and the cry has gone up that the 
Admiralty must see to it that more ships be at once built. 
It is really amusing to notice the frantic spasms that seize 
the English people generally when they learn of any other 
cation building a war vessel. It would appear that each 
Englishman took unto himself a personal affront, and all 
the papers, society, literary, and daily, echo this senti- 
ment. The weekly press in England is truly jingo. It 
now delights id nothing but military matters, and even the 
journals devoted to the aristocacy fill their columns with 
dry and statistical details regarding the army and navy, 
rather than those social functions for which they were 
created, and each paragraph, of course, has some bearing 
on what could be done in China if the occasion ever arose 
for active hostilities. 

As To Municipal The other day a committee of pro- 
Market Places. ducers met the Harbor Commissioners 
in relation to the matter of establish- 
ing what the promoters are pleased to call a ''free" 
market on the city front. The Commissioners were more 
than willing to set aside a part of the domain over which 
they have jurisdiction for the purposes the committee had 
in mind. So far, so good. But right there the real 
trouble came in. Commissioner Colnan seemed to think 
that what was asked for was a shed in which to expose 
country products for sale, and that the producer would 
bring them there and attend to the selling himself. One 
of the farmers promptly replied that "not one in a hun- 
dred would do that," and he seemed to be pervaded with 
the idea that the Harbor authorities should require the 
commission salesmen to come there and transact their 
business. It is needless to say that no power is vested in 
the men who regulate harbor matters to do this. That 



being the case, and it also being evident that the Commis- 
sion merchants would not sell in the market unless com- 
pelled to do so, and that producers by themselves alone 
have no power to make them go there, it follows that the 
market proposed would result in no market at all. A 
wearied committeeman present ventured upon the predic- 
tion that "it would be a long job to study out the details." 
It need not be so very long. Just such markets as the 
one now asked for are found in many of our Eastern cities, 
and have existed for hundreds of years in older countries. 
"The market place" is to-day, as it has been for centuries, 
the central point of attraction in almost every little town 
in Great Britain. Markets are there deemed to be what 
they really are: namely, public utilities, to be managed 
and controlled by the municipal authorities. They are 
considered to be of even more importance to the con- 
sumer than to the producer. The economical house-wife 
knows just where to go to buy the best and the cheapest 
on the retail side of the market, while the peddler and 
small dealer are equally well served on the wholesale side. 
Only perishable articles are allowed to be sold. The 
market buildings are owned by the municipality, are sub- 
ject to the most rigid investigation by inspectors duly 
qualified and appointed for that purpose. Dues are col- 
lected from the producer and salesmen, who must in the 
first instance make their sales through the market only. 
If caught peddling outside, they are heavily fined. By 
this means an assurance is afforded that all perishable 
articles must reach the market, where they can be duly 
examined by food inspectors. The fact of the matter is 
that our farmers have gone to the wrong source for as- 
sistance. The City Fathers alone can supply what is 
needed, because they alone can make and enforce the 
necessary ordinances. Before starting for the City Hall, 
however, they should seek the help of consumers, who, 
after all, are the parties chiefly concerned. The time is 
ripe for the full and practical discussion of this subject. 
The city must sooner or later own and control her own 
markets. 

McKenna's The laying over of Attorney General 
Confirmation McKenna's nomination to the Supreme 
Opposed. Bench, does not necessarily mean that it 
will ultimately be defeated, but it has a 
threatening aspect. The main grounds of opposition to 
him are that he does not possess the necessary knowledge 
of the law, the requisite literary or mental culture, nor 
the essential accuracy and firmness of judgment to qualify 
him to serve efficiently in the highest judicial tribunal in 
the land. Of course, if these allegations be true, his con- 
firmation is a serious matter. As to that, laymen are not 
the best judges, and members of the Bar are to be con- 
sulted with respect. Mr.McKenna has held several posi- 
tions in California, and we never heard anybody, lawyer 
or otherwise, say that he did not fill them creditably. 
Whilst he was United States Circuit Judge, several im- 
portant cases came before him, and were tried with a 
dignity, a judicial fairness, and a knowledge of the law 
that satisfied the requirements of his position, and won 
the favorable judgment of the legal profession. His 
opinions were well written, lucid, and creditable in every 
respect. His honor and integrity we never heard ques- 
tioned. He is a Californian, and this State and Coast 
claim the successorship to the seat of ex-Justice Field. 
The conditions and interests of the Pacific are so different 
from those of the Atlantic border that we need and are 
entitled to representation on the Supreme Bench. 
Senator Hoar of Massachusetts was absent from his place 
when this matter was before the Senate the other day. 
It is said that the confirmation depends upon his vote. 
He is so keen a party man that it will probably not be 
withheld. 

The Labor The labor agitator agitates everything but 
Agitator. his own laziness. He is the most untiring 
loafer in the kingdom of fatigue; the most 
indefatigable "jaw-master-general" in the empire of wind. 
Of advice he is a prodigal; of perspiration a miser. He is 
an unabridged of every "anti" on God's earth, but anti- 
talk. What he says of the wealthy, he borrows of his 
envy. What he knows of work, he gleans from hearsay 
evidence. To the great unbathed he is a font of wisdom : 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 22. [898. 



a perennial outgusbing of "know it all." He is, to the 
masses, that most impressive of all things— dignified lazi- 
ness, spiced with invisible means of support. Saying 
much and doing nothing, is the idol of saying nothing and 
doing much. 

Poverty's inborn instinct couples meanness with means; 
parsimony with plenty. Euvy is the child of poor parents. 
Between the heaven of something and the hell of nothing 
is the fixed gulf of empty discussion; the purgatory of 
eternal argument. The agitator originates nothing. He 
is a bellows, fanning the spark that ever smoulders in 
poverty's rags. He magnifies the little, strengthens the 
weak, intensifies the false. It takes little logic to con- 
vince prejudice. An uninteresting man is interesting 
when he talks of the interesting. If you would be popular 
with the sons of toil, cheat them. Would you brand your- 
self their suspect.' help them. A philanthropist to the 
masses is as medicine to children— a hated remedy. The 
American mechanic is a reader; a thinker. Yet, how 
often he leaves forge, furnace and family to grow cold, 
while he listens to the drivel of some wretch, to whom a 
drop of honest sweat is a briny ocean. 

A strike proves that lions may be led by asses; asses 
by rascals. When the agitator suffers from strikes, the 
strike will cease from troubling and the laborer cease to 
rest. We blame no man for wishing to rise. We marvel 
that the bread-winners' committee of one on industrial 
grievances should be a man whose jaw and gastric juice 
monopolize his energy. Antagonizing class and mass is 
not difficult. Without a little dog's suggestion, big dogs 
rarely fight. A mosquito can wake up a sleeping giant; 
a more ignoble insect, interrupt the repose of a genius. 
The agitator merely irritates the sore. He lances no boil. 
He is the fool fool-fooler of the nineteenth century; the 
most positive humbug among our negative nuisances. 

San Francisco's The City and County Hospital is in a 
Nobiost Institution sad condition. It is totally unfit for 
A Disgrace To It. the habitation of strong and healthy 
men; to say nothing of the infirm and 
sick who are compelled by their needs to go there in the 
dark hours of nature's distress. An old wooden shanty 
run up in haste twenty-five years ago, and intended to 
serve only until a more suitable building could be erected, 
it now trembles as if to fall with every wind that blows, 
rain is driven in through the roof and casements, the floors 
are rotten and liable to fall in at any moment, and taken 
all together its continued existence is a shame and a dis- 
grace to this great and wealthy city. A City and County 
hospital, instead of being the last, ought to have been the 
first public institution to have been supplied. We could 
have done without the Halls of Justice, and other things, 
for awhile longer, but to have done so long without the 
greatest utility a city can possess is a bad and sad reflec- 
tion upon our humanity. The poor and the sick we must 
always have with us. Many of them have been taxpayers, 
paid their dues and are entitled to hospital attendance, 
not as a charity, but as a right. Those who can fee 
nurses, pay doctor bills, and make hospitals of their 
home, are the fortunate few. A county hospital, being 
supported by general taxation, ought to be open to all who 
need its benefits. It is capable of an immense amount of 
good of a kind that cannot be done by any other means, 
and for which no substitute has been or can be discovered. 
The work of the combined charities of the city sink into in- 
significance, compared with the inestimable value of a 
public hospital under proper governmental control. The 
best of us may need its benefit some day. 

California's Golden It is lift}' years since gold was dis- 
Juoilee covered in California. It seems as if 

Celebration. it were but yesterday, yet many 

things have happened since then. 
Amonif these has been the remarkable development of this 
glorious State of ours, than which the sun does not shine 
upon a better. Those of us who can afford to travel, and 
spend time and money in informing ourselves of the advan- 
tages of other places, are notoriously glad to return, and 
about their first exclamation is: "California is good 
enough for me. It is God's own land." Our people are 
nothing if not proud of, and loyally devoted to, every- 



thing that is truly Californian. Our climate is more 
balmy than that of the Riviera, our scenery is more varied, 
and in places more grand, than that of Switzerland, our 
mode of life is as free and easy as that of Paris, our hospi- 
tality is as boundless as the ocean that confronts us, our 
place on the map of the world faces the older civilization 
of the Orient, and the vast possibilities of an ocean before 
which the Atlantic is doomed to dwarf into insignificance, 
our fruits, taken as a whole, beat those of any other one 
locality, and here, in the words of the Good Book, our lines 
are cast in pleasant places. If we have troubles, they are 
but those which we share in common with all humanity. 
Situated as we are, it is fitting that we should recall the 
portentious event which gave California to us, poured un- 
told gold into the lap of commerce, and called this most 
western outpost of civilization to a destiny that may not 
be fully realized to-day. Just fifty years ago the first evi- 
dence was unearthed that this was a land of gold. At 
that time California was a terra incognita except to a 
few missionaries and an occasional trading vessel in 
quest of hides and skins. Marshall, in January, 184K, 
discovered gold in Sutter's mill-race, and quickly Cali- 
fornia ceased to be a land unknown. Separated from 
the great centers of population by the broad expanse 
of this continent, it was a place difficult to reach. 
Yet, people, some by way of the plains, more by way of 
the fever-stricken Isthmus of Panama, and others around 
the stormy Horn, reached here and founded a new seat of 
empire, and added California to the union of States that 
together constitute the greatest nation on earth. It is 
fitting that we celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of the 
event that prepared the way for all this, and we are going 
to do so. Pioneers, Native Sons and Daughters, loyal 
Californians, and visitors from all over the State, will take 
possession of San Francisco, and run it for a week in a 
manner that we are sure will mark a new mile-stone in 
our wonderful progress. 

Mr. Gladstone's The first alarming dispatches as to Mr. 
Illness. Gladstone's condition have happily been 

modified by later and more official ones. 
Yet the fact is not disguised that he is a sick man and 
that the balmy climate of Cannes is not producing the 
beneficial effects expected. He sits up to his meals and 
even drives out with his wife when the weather is favor- 
able, and it may be that his vigorous constitution may 
enable him to survive a few years longer. His mind is cer- 
tainly not yet contemplating early dissolution, for it was 
only the other day that he wrote the National Liberal Club 
that he hoped to be back at work at Harwarden about 
the middle of February. A noble and pathetic figure is 
that of this old man, eloquent at Cannes, spending the 
calm eventide of a more than usually stormy life, and yet 
remaining the central figure of interest to the mighty 
empire he has served so long and so well. It was only on 
the 29th of last month that he celebrated his eighty-eighth 
birthday, in his usual good health. Nearly thirty years 
ago he wrote to a friend that he had followed most of his 
contemporaries to the tomb. Yet in the long iuterval since 
then he has himself remained vigorous in both mind and 
body. Only four years ago he conducted the Irish Home 
Rule bill through the House of Commons with an eloquence, 
versatility, sarcasm, information, and resource that have 
never been surpassed. He long since passed all previous 
records by serving his country as Prime Minister at a 
more advanced age than any of his predecessors had ever 
done. He has been First Minister of the empire oftener 
than any of his rivals. In a record-cutting age he has cut 
many records. He is to-day a kind of eighth wonder of 
the world to many; a man of whom all his fellow country- 
men, irrespective of class or creed, are proud, and to whom 
all Europe and America look with interest and respect. 
May his wish to be back at work again at Harwarden in 
February be realized. 

Nickel Plate — West Shore Fitchburg Route. 
The popular low-rate short line between Chicago am! Buffalo, New 
York. Boston, and other Knstern cities. Three elegHtiily-eijuipped, 
vestibuted trains daily; Wagner sleeping cars and Nickel Plnte Din- 
ing Cars. No change of cars Chicago to New York, or Ch c»eo to 
Boston. For particulars, address B. F. Horner, G. P. and T. A. , Cleve- 
land, O.; J. Y. Calahan. (i A 111 Adams street. Chicago 111., or 
Jay W. Adams, P. C. P. A., 37 Crocker Building San Francisco Cal. 



January 22. 1898. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




^- XL PREMIUM on confession was awarded 
[ L Mrs Augusta Nack when she was sen- 
tenced to imprisonment for fifteen years for having con- 
ceived the murder of one paramour, the bath-house rub- 
ber, and induced another paramour, the barber, to do the 
actual butchery of the unsuspecting victim. Mrs. Nack 
confessed, and enabled the prosecution to convict para- 
mour No. 2. By good conduct, and Mrs. Nack has been 
wonderfully and religiously good since her confession, she 
will save about six years of her sentence, and in 1907 will 
be ready for any new business that may offer. With the 
light of experience to guide her footsteps, she may so 
work out the details next time that confession may not be 
necessary. Meanwhile Thorn, No. 2, is at Sing Sing, 
pending electrocution, if the uncertain courts do decide 
that he has had a fair trial. The Nack punishment cer- 
tainly does not fit the crime. 

* * * 

The Telephone Girl as produced at the Casino, has 
proved a regular boomerang for the wise critics, who with 
two notable exceptions declared it the worst failure of the 
Casino's many successful seasons. The exceptions were 
the Herald and the Journal. The former approved but 
with very faint praise as if the critic was constrained to 
the effort, but know-it-all Allan Dale of the latter was 
full of gush. He usually leads the cohorts of fault finders. 
The other critics sat down very hard on the new "Girl" 
and she ought to have died au nature!. But she didn't; on 
the contrary, she is very much alive, — she and all the 
other telephone girls who try to make merry. "Whereat, 
surprised are the critics, while the Journal devotes column 
to iteration and re-iteration of praise. The fact that the 
Casino is crowded every night shows that there is a great 
manager at the head. George W. Lederer couldn't afford 
to make a failure, and supported by a generous "angel" 
he has made success from defeat. As to the real merits 
of the Telephone Girl, e'est une autre chose. 

* # * 

Mrs. McCusker, who resides at the ancient town of 
Camden, in the almost independent State of New Jersey, 
faced a jury of twelve of her peers last week to answer 
for the murder of her husband, according to the theory of 
the prosecution. She took the stand and demolished 
that theory effectually by declaring that it was all an ac- 
cident. Her husband had the pistol; she grabbed it to 
prevent his doing harm to either; it went off, that was all. 
She didn't offer the usual excuse that she did not know it 
was loaded. New Jersey jurors have a reputation for 
sternness, but they acquitted Mrs. McCusker. And now 
all the newspapers are declaring that it was because the 
defendant was the handsomest woman in New Jersey, and 
that her smiles and tears, alternating and chasing each 
other across her face and adown her cheeks, accomplished 
the result. Potent is beauty anywhere. 

* # * 

Charley Pair, after a long relapse, is at it again, the 
leather sample room of the Hotel imperial echoing to the 
dull thud which followed a blow from an irate Thespian' of 
low degree, as bis head struck the floor very early last 
Sabbath morning. The tenderloin is a bad district to 
operate in when one has an ungovernable temper and in- 
dulges in too many cold bottles for supper. Charley's 
friends have exerted all their good offices to induce him to 
live within his spiritual powers; but he has a will of his 
own, and will not brook control. 

* # * 

The death of Major Handy makes it quite probable that 
M. H. de Young of the Chronicle will be honored by ap- 
pointment as Director General or Commissioner of the 
United States' end of the Paris Exposition of 1900. There 
is quite a rivalry for the position, but the Californian is 
away ahead by reason of his experiences in such enter- 
prises. His clear-headed article in the Christmas News 
Letter on the subject has been widely read and with much 
favorable comment. 



May Irwin has been coining money galore since, as al- 
ready stated, she dispensed with the services of middle- 
men managers and concluded to run herself on an econom- 
ical basis. One tangible result is the purchase of an 
$85,000 apartment house in middle New York. "Don't 
know how long it would have taken me to earn such an in- 
come producer," said genial May, "under the old dispen- 
sation. " She has been crowding the Bijou for ever so many 
weeks, and there doesn't seem any let up in the attendance. 
New York does like to laugh — sometimes at the very 
slightest provocation. There is a report that Miss Irwin 
will go to London in the summer, which would argue that 
some people don't know when they have a good thing. 

# * * 

George Crocker has returned from California, and is 
now very busy of afternoons watching the demolition of 
the house which stands on the Fifth Avenue lot he recently 
purchased. A more modern residence, with all the latest 
architectural ideas and improvements will be erected, so 
that the Crocker establishment will be as swell as John 
Jacob Astor's a block away. "George," as his friends 
call him, is attending strictly to his Wall-street business 
and has no time for foolishness. 

# * * 

There is quite an influx of Spring buyers from the Coast 
looking for bargains, which are said to be quite plentiful 
in the dry goods district. Among others met in lower 
Broadway this week were B. Schweitzer, of B. Schweitzer 
& Co., W. Swanson, of the J. W. Robinson Co., and J. C. 
EaglesonofE. Hawkins & Co., Henry Thorp, of Wein- 
stock, Lubin & Co., Sacramento, J. Steinberger, of Stein- 
berger (& Katischer; L. Weil, of Greenbaum, Weil & 
Michaels, A. A. Son of Son Bros & Co. 

# # # 

George C. Gorham, once upon a time a great political 
power, first on the Pacific Coast, then in Washington as 
Secretary of the United States Senate, was in New York 
on a visit during the holidays. He is classified among the 
"has beens" and has withdrawn entirely from the sphere 
of political influence. He begins to look old and is evidently 
a sufferer from rheumatism. 



New York, January 17, 1898. 



Entre Nous. 



THE man who goes to Alaska without one of the Good- 
year rubber ponchos will make a great mistake. This 
article has a hood, and it is so made that it can be con- 
verted into a comfortable tent, or turned into a blanket to 
keep out the moisture and protect one from cold. It is 
light, serviceable, and will last an indefinite period. No 
Alaska outfit is complete without it. The Goodyear Com- 
pany make patent leather soled boots, crack-proof boots, 
leather-soled rubber boots, felt boots, mittens and gloves, 
oil packing sacks, Gold Seal miners' rubber boots — in fact, 
a full line of reliable rubber goods. The name of this com- 
pany is in reality an endorsement of quality, and the stock 
and variety of Goodyear rubber clothing covers the en- 
tire range of supplies of this character required by the 
Alaska gold hunter. 

IT is with deep regret that the numerous friends of 
Charles M. Shortridge throughout this State learn of 
his probably fatal illness, for it is likely that before this 
paragraph reaches the public his death will have been an- 
nounced. His name is familiar in newspaper circles of the 
State, and he has long been prominently identified with 
daily journalism in San Jose. In this city the people who 
know him and prize his friendship will watch with painful 
interpst the news from Gilroy Hot Springs, where he lies 
stricken. 

"Cock o' the North ! " Watson's Scotch Whiskey. Sold by all 
fir"t cms* dealers. 

Shake Into Your Shoes 

Allen's Foot Ease, a Powder for the 
feet. It cures painful, swollen, smarting feet, and instantly takes the 
sting outot corns and bunions. Ii s the greate&t comfort discovery of the 
a*e. Allen's Foot-Ease makes tight fitting or new shoes feel easv. It is 
a certain cure for sweating, callous, and hot, tired, aching feet. Try it 
today. Sold by all druggists and shoe stores. B? mail for&Sc. in stamps. 
Trial package FREE. Address, Allen S. Olmsted, Le Roy, N. Y. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 22, 1898. 




We obey no wand but pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 



w 



\ ODERN actors are generally so 
much better than their plays that I 
am constantly tempted to be unprofes- 
sional enough to lead off with the per- 
■ formance and relegate the piece to the 
last paragraph, usually reserved for the 
company only. It pains me to undo this compliment 
to the profession by adding that it seems as if, by 
the pieces we are seeing and have lately seen, the art of 
acting is the only art of the stage which is left us for seri- 
ous reviewal. tht Jucklim was the last new piece we 
have had here with any but a frankly frivolous intent, but 
when its author did not take it seriously how could we? 
And now among the Nights in New York, Girls from Paris, 
Gay New Torhs and Coney Islands, and the new "Syn- 
thesis of Farce. Comedy, and Music,' at the California, 
we hail Tin Van From Mexico as a precious classic. 

The modern history of the stage is the struggle of 
players with their parts. Players are presumably and 
generally quite averagely witted people, and, if they do 
not bring their capabilities to fruition, it is because they 
are so constantly fitted with parts which tend to limit and 
benumb their powers and perceptions; their parts are so 
far below their own intellects that every cast is a burial 
ground of idle talents. I wonder if all this elaborate and 
deliberate writing down to suit the public taste is really 
necessary, or if it is not a delusion of the purveyors of 
stage performances. Consistently actors ought to be 
chosen with a view to their inferior intelligence, in order 
to make their audiences feel at home. As it is the players 
are the best part of the modern drama, legitimate or ille- 
gitimate, and by far the most popular. It is useless to 
say too much importance is attached to them until the 
pieces they interpret are more important. 
# # * 

Courted into Court, by John J. McNally, is an amusing 
entertainment wholly by virtue of clever individual perform- 
ances. It is easy to imagine how dreary it would be in 
the hands of an inferior company, or one as bad as that 
which took the California stage last week. It is an in- 
valuable piece; beginning as an indifferent farce, it veers 
oil into a variety show and proves diverting in proportion 
to the preponderance of farce over variety. The first act 
is the best, — until the specialty business, which is not very 
special, begins; the court scene ought to have been, but it 
is not worked out with sufficient purpose. 

But Miss Marie Dressier is immense. (I use the term 
in its slang, and not its literal, sense). It is not her ex- 
tras I admire so much, — though her songs and recitations, 
her mugs and her moues, are all clever in their way, — it 
is her acting and her vivid, commanding personality. As 
a farce comedienne with a good, roystering play, she 
would be something to store in the memory and chuckle 
over in after solitudes. I would have it a roystering play 
because I could not afford to miss a scene like that in 
which, as Dottie Dimple, the actress, she " wipes up the 
floor" with Mortimer Morton when he comes to rehearse 
his new play with her, — by far the funniest scene in the 
whole piece, — which is certainly horse-play, but genuinely 
laughable because Miss Dressier has so potently suggested 
a sullen, overwrought woman suffering from an attack of 
nerves. Last week Miss McHenry was a sorry example 
of the utter futility of energy without brains. Miss Dress- 
ier combines the two in a remarkable degree. She charac- 
terizes her part and is besides of herself a person who 
commands attention. 

There are several other clever people in the cast and no 
incompetents. The one who secondly impresses himself is 
Mr. John J. Sparks, who impersonates an Irishman, Judge 
Jeremiah Geoghan, with a good deal of humorous percep- 
tion. Mr. Jacques Kruger gives an amusing sketch of 
Dottie's uncle, a harmless old soak. Mr. Rice has not re- 
markable opportunity but he appears popular. Mr. Oscar 



Figman's accomplishment consists of a triumphant make- 
up. He is a wondrous incarnation of a van Beers dude. 
Miss May Duryea is one of an increasing band of farce 
actresses who are pursuing fame with specialty laughs. 
Her laugh is a good one for her purpose, and by no means 
her only accomplishment. 1 will compliment the rest with- 
out specifying them. It is to the company of Courted Into 
Court that all the compliments are due. 
* * * 

"Brian Boroihme— a valiant and renowned prince; de- 
feated the Danes in the memorable battle of Clontarf on 
Good Friday, 1014; assassinated in his tent the same 
night, while" in the attitude of prayer. He was thirty 
years king of Munster, and twelve years king of Ireland." 

I looked for something romantic and historical in an 
opera called by the name of that "valiant and renowned 
prince," Brian Boroihme, Boruma, or Boru, but I soon 
perceived that it was but another irresponsible entertain- 
ment 1 had come to see, courting no judgment by legiti- 
mate standards. Mr. Stanislaus Stange, the librettist, 
and Mr. Julian Edwards, the composer, have made no at- 
tempt to localize or periodize their subject. Fragments 
of "The harp that once through Tara's halls," "The Min- 
strel Boy," and others of the national songs of Ireland, 
are as powerless against the modern waltzes, ballads and 
comic songs with which the piece abounds, as a sentence 
like "It is mete that two such noble warriors should join 
hands" is against "The English for that is 'You ride a bi- 
cycle' " in effecting any illusion of Irish medievalism. And 
if there were not proof enough of the attitude of the 
authors, the decoration of the Great Hall in Dublin Castle 
with union jacks, and the introduction of a rustic infant 
trimmed with pink ribbons and lace insertions would 
suffice. 

The piece is mostly given over to the antics of low 
comedians, among which the first king of Ireland, the gal- 
lant Brian, stalks like a lorn Lohengrin. He is admirably 
pictured by Mr. Arthur Donaldson, a man of heroic build 
and countenance. Another romantic figure is O'Connor, 
his standard bearer, effectively played by Mr. Arthur 
Boyce. Half of the cast is made up of English characters, 
though why they are not called Danes I cannot tell. The 
Danes were Ireland's oppressors in that period. 

As an entertainment Brian Boru may satisfy the amuse- 
ment-seeker — it is bright and contains several tuneful 
numbers -but as a "romantic opera" it is misnamed. The 
best singing is done by Miss Florence Walcott as Erina, 
the sister of O'Connor, and Mr. Raffaelas O'Donovan, who 
has only a minor part. Miss Edith Hall can hardly play 
Baby Malone differently from what she does, — no doubt 
she fulfils Mr. Stange's intention— but she might draw the 
line before addressing the conductor of the orchestra as 
she did on Monday night. Miss Salinger, Mr. Branson, 
Mr. Leary and most of the other members of the Tivoli 
company are in the cast. 

Brian Hum is not to be named with Shamui O'Brien; 
their intentions are entirely different. 

* * * 

Mr. Frederick Paulding's one-act play, .1 Man's Love, 
which is being performed as a curtain-raiser at the Alca- 
zar this week, is a painful story of a hunchback poet who 
is tricked by the friend for whom he makes the greatest 
sacrifices a man is capable of, in a spirit of pure devotion. 
It probes down to the sorrows of the heart that are past 
helping, and could only be conceived and written by a man 
of refined imagination and most sensitive feeling; one who 
knows the depths of suffering either intuitively or by bit- 
ter experience. Though its pathos compels sympathetic 
attention, the effect falls something short of the intention, 
because the extremity of emotion is too long sustained. 
Mr. Paulding plays the part of John Cecil, the poet, as 
one who has that intense love of his own work which only 
an artist knows. His performance displays a passionate 
force and a sense of the beauty of tragedy that are rare 
and impressive, but the situation, being so continually at 
climax height, makes it appear over-strained. Mr. Paul- 
ding does not receive any valuable support from the other 
two members of the cast. 

.1 Man's Lovi is followed by a fair performance of Dion 
Boucicault's farce, Forbidden Fruit. 



January 22, 1898. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS I.KTTKR. 



The Knaben-Kapelle band has been playing as well as 
ever at the Orpheum this week and continues its engage- 
ment for one week more. Rii'e A Elmer do amusing and 
astonishing horizontal bar business, and several other new 
turns — especially Professor Gallando, the lightning clay 
modeler — swell the bill successfully. There will be live new 
turns next week and a special matinee on Monday. 

The last performance of The Man From Mexico, which 
has played an eminently successful engagement at the 
Baldwin, takes place this evening. The Girl From Paris 
will take the Baldwin boards on Monday next. 

The third song recital by Anton Schott will be given at 
the Y. M. C. A. auditorium next Friday evening. There 
are to be six recitals in all, Friday evenings at 8:15. The 
two given thus far have been delightful, and much enjoyed 
by music lovers. 

Carpenters, painters, and upholsterers are busy repair- 
ing the desolations at the Columbia Theatre. New heat- 
ing aud electrical appliances have been contracted for, and 
Messrs. Friedlander, Gottlob & Co. hope to re-open the 
house at an early date. 

The Olympia Music Hall, corner of Mason and Eddy, 
re-opens to-day after interior renovations. There is a 
long list of variety turns, including Kirchner's Lady Or- 
chestra. 

At the fifth Symphony Concert, next Thursday after- 
noon, Mr. Scheel will play Dvorak's " New World " sym- 
phony; also Goldmark's "ImFruhling" overture, works 
by E. Chabrier and Leo Delibes, and a Hebrew Melody ar- 
ranged by Robert Franz, the editor of Bach and Handel. 

Mrs. Breitschuck-Marquardt, the well-known harpist, 
played before a crowded audience at the Y. M. C. A. 
Auditorium on Wednesday. Mr. John Marquardt played 
a violin solo and Mons Pierre Douillet labored at the piano. 

After the run of Brian Born, The Pearl of Pehin will be 
produced at the Tivoli, with Mr. Edwin Stevens as Tyfoo. 

Next week Sydney Grundy's adaptation, The Arabian 
Nights, a farce that has successfully held the stage for a 
number of years, will be produced at the Alcazar. 

SHAINWALD, Buckbee & Co. will sell on Tuesday next, 
January 25th, at their offices, Mills' Building, the 
properties of seventeen different estates. As every one 
of these properties will be sold to the highest bidder, the 
prices obtained on that day will be no criterion of values. 
Mr. Freese is the first Public Administrator who has made 
a practice of cleaning up estates instead of allowing them 
to remain unsettled, as had been done by his predecessors, 
pending opportunities to sell. By means of the auction 
rule estates have been wound up, although in many in- 
stances — in fact, in most cases — properties have been sold 
very much under their value, but the heirs as a rule, in 
these small estates, prefer to sell even at a sacrifice in 
order to get their little moneys out of these small estates. 
In this particular sale almost every portion of San Fran- 
cisco is represented, beginning with improved property 
on Ritch street; a Broadway corner, improved; a Mission- 
street lot; several homestead lots; Valencia-street flats 
and stores; Polk-street flats; Sutter-street building lot; 
several Mission cottages; Spear-street water lot; very 
fine corner on Clay and Leavenworth streets; and lots in 
Richmond and other districts. 



Champaqne. 
Moet & Chandon has tfie proud distinction ot occupying the sec- 
ond place in our champagne table for the first time in the annals of 
the trade. The brand has not only moved up in position, but the 
importations have increased in 1897, as compared with the previous 
year, over 12% percent, which is a larger ratio of increase than that 
made by any of the other prominent brands. In addition to this, 
Moet & Chandon was selected during the year as the only wine 
served at some of the ultra-fashionable entertainments given in this 
city. The fame of the wine has traveled from coast to coast, and 
its quality has endeared it alike to the connoisseur and occasional 
drinker.— Bonfon's Wine Circular. 



Holiday trade at George T. Marsh & Co.'s, 625 Market street, 
under the Palace hotel, was exceptionally gootl. The splendid line 
of Japanese wares, curios, tapestries, carvings,, etc., just imported 
by Mr. Marsh, who made a trip to Japan and selected them per- 
sonally, attracted all lovers of this quaint art. A fine stock remains 
and new invoices are being constantly received. The latest and best 
in Japanese work can always be found at this store. 



Ill Years 

of labor, expense, 

and improvement are 

represented 

in every bottle of 



EVANS' 
ALE. 



It wasn't 

"trusting to luck" 

that made it 

The Ale of To-day. 

SHERWOOD & SHERWOOD, 

Pacittc Coast Agents 

San Francisco, Portland, Los Angeles 




Blj / TL J_ Friedlander, Gottlob & Co., 

3 Id Wirt I nea"LT6- Lessees and Managers. 

Next Monday night, extraordinary engagement. Edward E. 
Rice's superb spectacle. " It is to laugh," 

THE GIRL FROM PARIS. 

Magnificent scenery, gorgeous costumes, excellent cast, beau- 
tiful chorus, fifty people. The greatest production of many 
seasons. 

r\ 1 rr\ % Fred. Belasco, Lessee. 

rMCaZar I neatre. Mark Than, Manager. Phone Main 254. 

Commencing Monday next. A great comedy treat in three acts, 

ARABIAN NIGHTS, 

By Sidney Grundy. 

Special Jubilee Day matinee Monday afternoon next. 

Popular prices, 15c, 2ac, 35c 50c, reserved. 

Note— A rare treat in preparation to follow. 



Orprr 



San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall O'Farrell 
gU rT\ . street, between Stockton and Powellstreets. 
Week commencing Monday, January 2itb, grand Jubilee bill. 

GARLETTA, 

World's greatest contortionist; Dolline Cole, America's great- 
est female barytone: Al Wilson, famous Dutch comedian; 
Crimmins & Gore, grotesque comedians; The American Hio- 
graph. new life scenes; positively last week of tbe Knaben- 
Kapelle ; Carter De Haven, diminutive comedian : Rice & Elmer ; 
Professor Gallando, and Czita. Grand Jubilee matinee Mon- 
day, January 24th. 

Reserved seats, 25c; balcony, 10c; opera chairs and bos seats, 
50c; Matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday. Matinee 
Prices: Parquet, any seat, 25c; balcony, any seat, lUc; chil- 
dren, 10c, any part. 



Tivoli Opera House. 



MBS. ERNESTINE KBELING, 

Proprietor and Manager 

Every evening. The triumph; the musical event of the season; 

the romantic comic opera, BRIAN BORU. 

Great cast; special scenery; correet costumes; appropriate 

accessories ; enlarged chorus ; augmented orchestra. "The 

Harp that Once Through Tara's Halls." 

Next week, the merry fantasie, 

THE PEARL OF PEKIN. 

Song, dance, humor. 
PopularPrices 25c and 50o 



Tivoli Opera House. — Extra 

Thursday afternoon, January 27th, at 3:15 o'clock. Fifth concert 

SAN FRANGISGO SYMPHONY SOCIETY 

FRITZ SGHEEL, musical conductor. 

Programme — Overture, Im Fruhling (In Springtime). Goldmark. 

Symphony, " From the New World V Dvorak; Hebrew Melody, 

arranged by Robert Franz: Coppelia (ballet), Leo Delibes; Es- 

poma Rhapsody,' E. Chabrier 

Prices including reserved seats. $1.50, $1. and 75c. Seats on 

sale at Tivoli, commencing Monday, January 2ith. 



Ellis and Mason Sts„ 
San Francisco. 



Y. M. G. A. Auditorium 

ANTON SGHOTT RECITALS. 

Six Educational Song Recitals on Friday evenings, commencing 
January Uth, and to be continued for five weeks. 
FRIDAY EVENING, 8:15 o'clock. 
Prices— $1 and 50 cents. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 22. i8y8. 




^HEY were slumming 
— only a select few — 
in charge of a very worthy citizen who is steadily acquir- 
ing a fortune, and believes that enjoyment can be had — a 
pure, sweet, and saintly enjoyment— at a dinner at the 
immortal Sanguinetti, rather than in a dearer place. They 
were all sitting at a long table— and the night was Satur- 
day. And there was feasting and singing and howling, 
and later on there was dancing and high-kicking — and 
they all eDJoyed it immensely. When some one called out 
"Give us a song, Tom," and several feminine voices 
chimed in, too, "Give us a song, Tom" — and Tom was 
sitting near "the elect" and his chair was next to one of 
the elect — a sweet little girl whose brother is well known 
here and lives not far from Monterey, and she, too, chimed 
in "Do give us a song, Tom." And Tom sang, and sang 
rarely well; and as he sat down his chair bumped against 
her chair. " I beg your pardon," said he; " I hope." and 
he looked earnestly at her, "that you don't think I am not 
a gentleman because I am with this crowd." And she 
answered demurely, "Really!" " I can prove it to you," 
he said, earnestly, and pulling out a letter he showed he 
was the son of a Lord Bishop somewhere or another in 
England. 



The social world of San Francisco is again arrayed in a 
bloodless warfare in which buds and blossoms, maids and 
matrons, and all their kith and kin are involved. A feud 
has arisen between twoof the season's fashionable leaders, 
aud in drawing room and club the breach is discussed. 
Opinions differ of course, but in every case it is a matter 
of regret that war should be waged against young girls. 
Mrs. Salisbury, a lady who directs the doing of the Friday 
Fortnightly club, has excluded four young girls from the 
invitation list of the club's dances. Now comes a very big 
note of interrogation. Singularly enough the young ladies 
thus tabooed by the matron are among the very prettiest 
buds that the Swim can boast. "Handsome is that hand- 
some does." says the old proverb, and Mrs. Salisbury is 
credited with upholding old proverbs. She knows the ring 
of true metal, her friends claim, and no counterfeit can 
produce it. But after all what a silly quarrel it is. Per- 
sonal grievance can have no place in a club's action, and 
the question arises "Who has made any one woman or 
man, a censor of those who have parents to control and 
guide them?" It is amusing to note the perplexity of 
society people in this squabble. On the one hand present 
pleasure, the jolly dances and jovial matron so amiable to 
all, who is backed by powerful friends in the "old set." 
On the other side the influence of relatives powerful alike 
in social and financial circles. Which side is the most pro- 
fitable to espouse is the vexed question of the hour; mean- 
while hot shot are flying and disinterested outsiders await 
the outcome with amused curiosity. 

# * * 
If there will not be some peculiar revelations and some 
sudden flittings from town in the next six months, then all 
predictions will be as naught. Dav after day some Yukon 
mining scheme is projected, and the projectors give most 
alluring promises as to what they will do. It is all a game 
to catch the gentlemen who " are euphoniously called 
suckers. Some, of course, will bite, and when they dis- 
cover that these projectors can by no manner of means 
live up to their agreements, there will be a 1 to the 

courts— and then there will happen some of the liveliest 
jumping this town has ever seen. 



Our young bachelors, in their efforts to be gallant, some- 
times tread on parental toes. Thus it happened recently 
that a well-known young beau in making a call upon a fair 
lady encountered his papa, who was just leaving, and now 
rumor says the son has had a good sized sum placed to his 
credit in the family Bank. 



To the reflective mind, one that judges things from an 
unbiased view, the hub-bub the ladies are raising over the 
refusal of the Cosmos Club to entertain them is not a little 
amusing. As an old bachelor remarked while discussing 
the subject. "Why, you might as well ask the Century- 
Club or Sorosis to let men go there to read and smoke as 
to ask the Cosmos to allow the women to come here. No, 
sir, the club that likes to run a restaurant for women can 
do as it may please, but I for one vote against it in ours." 
And so say the Pacific Union members. Surely the fair 
sex might be content with the privilege extended them by 
the University club, and not seek to encroach on bachelor- 

dom any further. 

* * * 

The madness for living up to one's means has been ex- 
emplified more than once in San Francisco. Not long since 
there died a lawyer in this city whom it was thought had 
left his family in fairly happy circumstances. It has since 
transpired that they were left without a cent, and even 
the life insurance policy was not kept up. But no one sus- 
pected that the grand mansion on California street, whose 
occupants have gone to Europe to ecouomize, were so 
hard-pressed that they had to stand off even their poultry 
man. Who else they stood off is a question which some 
people would like to have answered. 

* * * 

Now that so distinguished a social light as W. K. Van- 
derbilt has given his active sanction to all sorts of jolly 
doings in the Gotham swagger set, we may look for a re- 
production of some of them in our own local swim; and the 
spectacle of Ed Greenway, Winfield Jones, or Southard 
Hoffman prancing round in a cake walk may be expected 
any day. 

Call at RosekransAS Co., No. 342 Sutter street, and inspect their 
"Crown Incandescent Gas Burner." This burner has no equal, giv- 
ing the m>>t Ugh', a', the smi'le-it cost of any other gas-burner. 
These gentlemen supply mantles for all gas-burners. 






Egyptian Hbnn a. Safe, Sure, Pleasant A vegetable hair dye for 
restoring gray bulr to its original color. Immediate effect. Free from all 
objectionable qualities. At all druggists and hair dressers. Langley & 
Michaels Co., agents. 

Fine Watcb and Jewelry Repairing. Low prices. All work guaran- 
teed . J N Brlttan, watchmaker and jeweler, 20 Geary street. 

The FINEST GIN Imported. 



Especially Adapted for Family Use 
and Medicinal Purposes. 






In Large Square White Bottles. 



Annexed Trade Mark - - 
Appears on Cap and - - 
is Blown in on Shoulder 



Sold by Grocers and Dealers. ..Beware of Filled-Up Bottles 




Bole Agents. 



CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 

SI4 Sacramento St., S. F 



ScMraeder Bros.. 

BUTCHERS. 



FAMILY TRADE A SPECIALTY. 
1342 Market St.. San Francisco. 



DR. CHRISTENSEN, Dentist, 

Hm removed to 2720 Mission street, between Twenty-third and 
Twenty-fourth. Four specialists in attendance. 
Phone— Mission 160. 

U/ANTED:- Several trustworthy gentlemen or ladies to travel inCali- 
¥Y fornia for established, reliable house. Salary I7K0 and expenses. 
Steady position F.nclo&e reference and self-addressed stamped envelope. 
The Dominion Compary Dept. 7, Chicago, 1 11 



January 22. 1898. 



SAX FRANCISCO NRWS LETTER. 






~7S j - l_ lirf t 



CYCLOPS TO GALATEA.--W£ capital, d. c. 
(Paraphrase from the Eleventh Idyl of Theocritus). 

SOFTER than lambs and whiter than the curds, 
O Galatea, swan-nymph of the sea! 
Vain is my longing, worthless are my words; 

Why do you come in night's sweet dreams to me, 
And when I wake, swift leave me, as in fear 
The lambkin hastens when a wolf is near? 

Why did my mother on a dark-bright day 

Bring you for hyacinths a-near my cave? 
I was the guide, and through the tangled way 

I thoughtless led you ; I am now your slave. 
Peace left my soul when you knocked at my heart; 
Come, Galatea, never to depart! 
Though I am dark and bomelv to the sight— 

A Cyclops I, and stronger there are few— 
Of you I dream through all the quick-paced night, 

And in the morn ten fawn* I feed for you, 
And four young bears; O rise from grots below, 
Soft love and peace with me forever know ! 

Last night I dreamed that I, a monster finned, 
Swam in the sea and saw you singing there: 

I gave you lilies, and refreshing wind 
Laden with odors of all flowers rare; 

I gave you apples, as I kissed your hand, 

And reddest poppies from my richest land. 

brave the restless billows of your world ; 

They toss and tremble. See my cypress grove, 
And bending laurels, and the tendrils curled 

Of honeyed grapes, and a fresh treasure trove 
In vine-crowned JEtna, of pure, unning rills, 
Galatea, kill the scorn that kills ! 

Softer than lambs and whiter than the curds, 

Galatea, listen to my prayer, 

Come, come to land, and hear the song of birds; 

Rise, rise, from ocean-depths, as lily fair 
As you are in my dreams! Come, then, sleep, 
For you alone can bring her from the deep I 

And Galatea, in her cool, green waves, 

Plaits her long hair with purple flower-bells, 

And laughs and sings, white black-browed Cyclops raves 
And to the wind his love-lorn story tells, 

For well she knows that Cyclops will ere long 

Forget, as poets do, his pain in song. 

HE WHO HATH LQVE.D.— Walter malone, in dusk and dawn, 

He who hath loved hath borne a vassal's chain, 

And worn the royal purple of a king; 

Hath shrunk beneath the icy winter's sting, 
Then reveled in the gulden summer's reign ; 
He hath amid the dust and ashes lain, 

Then soared o'er mountains on an eagle's wing; 

A hut hath slept in, worn with wandering. 
And hath been lord of castle-towers in Spain. 
He who hath loved hath starved in hermit's cell, 

Then in Aladdin's jeweled chariot driven ; 
He bath with passion roamed, a demon fell, 

And had an angel's raiment to him given ; 
His restless soul hath burned with flames of hell, 

And winged through ever-blooming fields of heaven. 

A WEDDING RING. 

Lines given by a prelate with a ring to his wife on the sixteenth 
anniversary of their wedding : 

" 'Thee, Mary, with this ring I wed,' 

So sixteen years ago 1 said. 

Behold another ring! ' For what ? ' 

To wed thee o'er again — why not? 
" With the first ring I marrifd youth, 

Grace, beauty, innocence, and truth; 

Taste long admired, sense long revered, 

And all my Polly then appeared. 
" If she, by merit since disclosed. 

Prove twice the woman I supposed, 

1 plead that double merit now 
To justify a double vow." 




Smoking Tobacco ## 



BRUSHES 



For barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses, bil- 
liard tables, brewers, book-binders, candy-makers, 
canners. dyers, flour-mills, foundries, laundries, 
paper-hangers, printers, painters, shoe taotories, 
stablemen, tar-roofers, tanners, tailors, etc. 



BUCHANAN BROS., 

BRUSH MANUFACTURERS, 609 Sacramento St , S. F Tel. 5610. 

UNITED STATES 
LAUNDRY. 



Telephone South 420, 



Office, 1004 Market Street. 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



Baflflage Notice. 



Baggage called for and delivered 
at trains, steamers, etc. Trunks 
35 cents. Baggage called for, 
weighed and checked at your 
Hotel or residence. Trunks 50c. 



PACIFIC TRANSFER CO., 20 Sutter St. 



Partington's Sctiool 

Of ... . 
424 PINE STREET, S. F. 

Extra Classes on Saturdays and evenings. 



MAGAZINE and 

NEWSPAPER 

ILLUSTRATION. 



LUDLftM- 



928 Sutter St. 



ELOCUTION and 

DRAMATIC ART. 



Be SOLLY WALTER SgHooI ol Illustration, 



In Pen and ink. 



26 O'Farrell Street. 



S1GN0R FERNANDO MIGHE.LE.Nfl, 

Vocal studio. Y. M. G. A. building, room 2, third floor. 
Complete artistic preparation, Fnglish, Italian, French and Spanish. Pose 
of voice, gesture, repertoire. Reception hours: 1 to 2 p.m. Terms moderate. 

RRFFN I2 ^ O'Farrell street, 

Coal MBrchants *° w^a^d £^11 

nnAQ Genuine Wellington 

DnUO. coiii a specialty. 

Orders promptly Delivered. Telephone Red 1581 



WANTED:— Several trustworthy gentlemen or ladies to travel in Cali- 
fornia for established, reliable house. Salary S780 and expenses. 
Steady position. Enclose reference and self-addressed stamped envelope. 
The Dominion Company, Dept 7, Chicago. 111. . . 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 22, 1898. 



SCARAMOUCHI. 



Kroni the Papers of Arthur D. Caine. By Chaklks K. Brimblecom, 

PROBABLY there are many people in San Francisco 
who remember the unveiling of the statue of Scara- 
mouchi, the musician, at Golden Gate Park a number of 
years ago, on which occasion his most marvelous produc- 
tion, "Immortal Love," was played by the Park band and 
heard by enraptured thousands. They will remember as 
well the subsequent abrupt removal of the statue from the 
Park, about which a great oufcry was made by the city 
papers for a day or two. There was aseeret, mysterious 
history linked with all this, which I will briefly reveal. 

Scaramouch', the musician, was a man of genius, yet he 
died poor and alone in San Francisco. He had written 
much good music, which brought him a great deal of 
money. I hid patronized him myself; but his temper was 
bad, and he rudely offended me more than once. For some 
time before his death he was unfortunate, — he wrote 
nothing that paid. 

So he had become quite a hermit, and being absorbed in 
a sublime musical work had probably neglected to pro- 
cure sufficient sustenance, (which he could easily have done 
at a soup-house I had established for the poor of the city). 
My learned old friend, Dr. Philostratus, was of this 
opinion. 

Scaramouchi had revealed to me another side of his 
character. He was a student of mystical things. His 
researches seemed to be directed to the prolongation of 
life, and to that mysterious achievement of adepts called 
the projection of the astral form, whereby the magician, 
while his physical body lies in a state of unconsciousness, 
can traverse vast distances with the velocity of thought, 
and appear in his usual semblance to whomsoever he will. 
He was very reticent, and I never kDew to what degree 
of proficiency he had attained; but after the singular 
events which I will relate, some strange ideas occurred to 
me in regard to him. 

Under Scaramouchi's dead hand there was found an un- 
finished piece of music, and it was brought to me. It was 
that wonderful production entitled, "'Immortal Love." 
Beneath the title I read: 

"To Iphigenia." 

I own a great deal of real estate in San Francisco; a 
cellar of fine old wine, a steam yacht, the "Silver Witch," 
and other trinkets; also mines, forests, and vineyards, in 
many places. But Miss Iphigenia Delacre inherited all of 
her father's vast wealth, and her millions more than equal 
mine. Iphigenia is beautiful, giacious, and sincere. On 
the other hand she is sometimes capricious and a little 
sentimental. She can at times display a superb indigna- 
tion. Occasionally she vexes me, — tries my patience; and 
above all, she wants to vote. Yet, one kind glance from 
her pure eyes atones for all that, — even the voting. 

When Scaramouchi wrote "Immortal Love," he reached 
far upward, or downward, and grasped a handful of un- 
earthly fire. Had I realized the power of his genius I 
should have been troubled; but I did not fear the dead. I 
gave the manuscript to Iphigenia. She read the inscrip- 
tion, and sighed. 

" Poor fellow," she murmured, sorrowfully. 

1 thought she betrayed too much feeling. She knew, 
then, that the fiddler, Scaramouchi, had adored her. Well, 
he was only one ot a thousand who worshipped my star at 
a distance. 

At Iphigenia's request I gave the music to Atabal, the 
leader of the Park band, asking him to play it. Soon 
after, he came to me greatly excited. He declared the 
music to be most extraordinary. His men were wild over 
it. It was full of singular difficulties, but strange and 
wonderful beauties tempted them to immense exertions. 

I went to hear them practice, and I cannot describe the 
strange effect which those enchanting melodies, those in- 
tricate harmonies, those wild whirlwinds of passionate 
sound produced upon me. Then it broke off abruptly, 
leaving the listener with an intense longing to bear more, 
for, remember, it was never finished. It was more intoxi- 
cating than wine. It completely turned my head, as was 
shown the next day wheu I made arrangements with one 
of our most distinguished sculptors to execute a life-sized 



statue of Scaramouchi, to be placed in Golden Gate Park. 

An immense crowd was present at the first rendering 
of the piece in the Park. Atabal and his magnificent 
band occupied the music stand. When Scaramouchi's 
marvelous composition was played, all other sounds died 
away before that unearthly, music. The great tbronar 
seemed spellbound. They turned pale, and listened with 
enraptured gaze. I saw women weeping. When the 
abrupt end was reached, there were loud murmurs and 
entreaties for the band to finish the piece. Atabal ad- 
dressed them. I do not know what he said. 

I was on horseback beside Iphigenia's carriage. As the 
wonderful music sang in ecstasy, and moaned in agony, 
souuding the whole grand and terrible gamut from heaven 
to hell, she grew pale and paler, and soon fell back faint- 
ing. I was alarmed, and advised her frightened compan- 
ions to take her home. Before we reached her house she 
had revived enough to weep. 

Of course I called the next dav. At that hour she was 
usually practicing on a type-writer, with the absurd idea 
that she would some day be reduced to penury and ob- 
liged to toil for her living. But on that day I found her at 
the piano playing some of Scaramouchi's music. She was 
very gentle, and indifferent, and abstracted. Sometimes 
she forgot that I was there. 

Atabal quarreled with his musicians because they did 
not perform impossibilities in interpreting "Immortal 
Love." So the piece was not played again in public until 
after Scaramouchi's statue had arrived and had been 
placed in the Park. Everybody said it was a fine piece of 
sculpture; but my enthusiasm had cooled. 

The next Saturday the statue was unveiled and "Im- 
mortal Love" was played. There was an enormous crowd 
in the ^ark. I had tried to induce Iphigenia to remain at 
home, but had been met with such a look of indignation 
that I changed the subject, and soon after retired to 
solace myself with a bjttle of Chateau La Rose. 

The second performance of "Immortal Love" was even 
more impressive than the first. Scaramouchi on his 
pedestal seemed gazing with a melancholy smile upon the 
breathless throng of listeners. Heavens! What thrilling, 
exi|uisite music — what sublimity of sound! Such notes 
might well move trees and rocks, as did the notes of 
Orpheus. 

At that moment a very singular thing occurred. I hap- 
pened to look at the statue, and immediately felt that 
peculiar, chilly, and bristling sensation of the scalp, as if 
every hair on my head had been electrified. I had always 
been a sceptic in regard to anything supernatural, but, 
unless I was the victim of a strange optical illusion, Scara- 
mouchi had turned his face towards Iphigenia's carriage ! 

The music ceased abruptly, and the statue had again 
resumed its stony pose. As we rode home slowly, I won- 
dered if any one else had seen the ghostly stirring of the 
marble figure; but I dared not ask. When I reached my 
house I fortified myself with more La Rose. On reflection, 
I decided that it might be wise to consult Dr. Philostra- 
tus, and I did so. 

" My dear boy," said the doctor, who is surely approach- 
ing senility, "you own a fine yacht; I advise you to go 
fishing for your health. Shall I tell you what to use for 
bait?" 

" Yes." I replied, with some surprise. 

"The key of your wine-cellar," said Dr. Philostratus. 

I left the poor, foolish old man, and summoned Atabal to 
my house by telephone. In an hour I had all the music of 
" Immortal Love" in my possession. I explained to Ata- 
bel that I wished to examine it: but to myself I swore 
that no musician should ever see it again. 

It was a fine moonlight evening. I mounted my horse 
and rode out to the Park. Near the entrance I passed a 
coupe in the shadow. The driver sat silent and motionless. 
I rode on, and presently tied my horse to a tree, and 
walked toward the statue, which loomed white and cold in 
the moonlight. 

As I approached, I saw a figure kneeling at the base of 
the pedestal, and the mystical silence was pierced by a 
sob. In a few moments the figure rose, and 1 was hardly 
surprised to recognize Iphigenia. 

"O Scaramouchi," she moaned, gazing up at the statue, 
"why did you not reveal your sublime genius to me be- 
fore death took you from this world ? " 



January 22, 1898. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



She began to sing one of the sweetly mournful aiis of 
"Immortal Love. There was something weird about 
that music. Everything at that moment seemed unreal. 
My heart beat like a hammer with fright. 

Suddenly the statue seemed to waver in the moonbeams. 
I thought it was going to fall. The head moved — one hand 
was slightly lifted ! A cry of terror and warning burst 
from me. Iphigenia had not apparently perceived the 
movement of the statue; but at the sound of my voice she 
uttered a scream of fright, ran swiftly across the broad 
drive, and vanished in the deep shadows. 

With appalled courage I advanced upon Scaramouchi. 
His mockiug smile chilled me. Was it possible that his 
own magical music had power to inspire with life the mar- 
ble likeness of the dead musician? Or, had Scaramnuehi's 
astral form, still touched with earthly passion, taken up 
its abode in this stone image for lack of the body it had 
lost ? I had intended to destroy the statue, but a dread- 
ful thought paralyzed me: Would it not be murder? 

Yet this dangerous rival must be removed. Soon I heard 
heavy footsteps crushing the gravel. Several workmen, 
whom I had engaged to meet me there, came up. Under 
mv direction, Scaramouchi was taken down and carefully 
replaced in the case in which he had come. I shuddered 
as I saw that marble face looking up at me from the box. 
The cover was put on, and Scaramouchi began a long 
journey. His destination no man may know. 

It was dawn as I entered my apartments. A fire was 
blazing in the fireplace. There was a decanter of wine on 
the buffet. I drank. I unlocked my safe and took out the 
music of "Immortal Love." The crackle of the fire sounded 
like pistol-shots. I extended the music to the flames. 

" Damn you I Don't you do it ! " said a horrible, terri- 
ble voice. I started up. The ghost of Scaramouchi stood 
before me with deadly anger in its ghastly face. I became 
insensible. 

When I regained consciousness, the roll of music was 
gone, and I knew that it was not burned. That day I an- 
nounced that the music had been stolen; but I said nothing 
about my ghostly visitant. Iphige'nia was inconsolable at 
the loss, and offered a very large reward for its recovery. 

My nerves were shaken, and in a few weeks I induced 
Iphigenia and some of her friends to make a voyage to 
Japan with me in the "Silver Witch." Before we re- 
turned, I had banished ghosts and was happy; for on a 
beautiful evening in Japan, under the snowy blossoms of 
cherry trees, Iphigenia had set our wedding day. 
Fkoji Iphioenia's Diary. 

Midnight — It is my wedding night, and I am alone. 
Somewhere in this great house nyy husband lies in a heavy 
sleep. My conscience accuses me; but he shall never fly 
from me to wine again. 

Our wedding was magnificent, and all went happily un- 
til evening, when Atabal came with his band to serenade 
us. We stood at the window and saw the lovely gardens 
ablaze with torches and colored lanterns. Then the music 
rose, and we started back with painful emotion, for those 
weird, magical strains breathing upon the still air were 

the prelude to "Immortal Love ! " 

***** 

I must have acted strangely — shamefully, for when I 
regained my self-possession, Arthur had left me, and I soon 
learned that he was drinking, with reckless companions. 
I sent a trusty friend to Atabal to make inquiries. The 
leader said that he had this very day found the stolen 
music of " Immortal Love " lying on his desk. He was 
joyful at its recovery, and thought that it would be a 
pleasant surprise to play it at the wedding serenade. 

My friend collected the music, and here it lies before me. 

I feel that its power is evil, yet it is an appeal to the 

heart hardly to be withstood. No, no ! I never wish to 

hear those enchanting strains again. I shall break the 

spell and consign the dangerous gift of Scaramouchi to the 

flames. 

***** 

'Tis done. " Immortal Love " has dissolved into smoke 
and gray ashes. Now my heart is light. I will find Ar- 
thur, and watch by his side; and when the pure light of 
morning comes I will waken him with a kiss. 

I think I am nervous. While the manuscript was burn- 
ing, I imagined that a shadowy form stood there beyond 
the table, and I thought I heard a low, shuddering groan. 




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Buse Street, bet. Sansome and Montgomery, S. F 
This favorl'e hotel is under the management of 
Charles Montgomery, and is as good, if not the best, Family and. Bu->i 
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first-class service and the high- st standard of respectability guaranteed. 
Our rooms cannot be surpassed for neatness and comfort. 

Board and room— Per day. $1.25, $1.50, $1.75, and $2; per week, $7 to $12; 
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*ff"Free coach to and from the hotel. 



Hotel Bella Vista 



1001 Pink street 



A First-class Hotel 



The Bella Vista is the Pioneer 
Fust-class Family Hotel of 
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MRS. A. F. TEACY 



New York. 



Madison Square, Broadway and 23d 
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EUROPEAN PLAN. 



HOTEL, 

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A quiet home, Generally located, for 
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THE HOTEL PAR EXCELLENCE" 

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An illustrated eulde to Washington will be 

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W 1 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 22, 1898. 




There is some gratification in the belief 
Gold Mining that despite the Klondike, mining will 
In California, continue a leading industry in California. 

A great many people have awakened of 
late to the fact that there is gold to be found within our 
borders. Even ihe merchants of this city who worked so 
assiduously with the anti debris clique to throttle hydraulic 
mining for a space of ten years, at a cost to themselves of 
over eighty millions of dollars, are prepared to admit now 
that the industry is worth fostering. This is a step in ad- 
vance, certainly, and for which we can all be devoutly 
thankful. Even the "booming" of Alaska mines for the 
sake of corraling the trade of the individual who, impelled 
by inordinate greed is willing to risk his life, has not inter- 
fered in any way with the work of development going on 
throughout the State, in a small way, it may be said, but 
all the safer for that. There arechances now to getcheap 
investments. The Alaskan fever has penetrated some of 
the interior camps, and men can be found ready as usual 
to throw away a certainty for some uncertainty with more 
glitteriug prospects. This will be the opportunity for 
men of more conservative ideas. Money will go farther 
here than it does on the Yukon, not to speak of the differ- 
ence in the mode and conditions of life there aud here. 
Last year quite a number of young mines were opened up 
in the northern counties of this State, to a point in devel- 
opment where they are now self-supporting. Legitimate 
mining is now popular with the public, and no doubt, when 
the last of the Klondike emigrants take their departure 
for a new home in frozen wilds, we will have a little boom 
of our own to even matters up. 

The more one studies the prospectus of 

The Mining the Great Northern mining scheme, the 

Hog Rampant, more one is convinced of the necessity 

for State or national supervision of 
schemes of this kind. As evidence of the proclivities of 
the mining hog. it probably stands unparalleled in the an- 
nals of company promotion. It seems almost incredible, 
but it is a fact nevertheless, that out of the $2,000,000 
capital only some $70,000 (and this is an outside figure) 
will be paid to the bona- tide owners of this property in 
California. This, too, in face of the sum of £280,000, or in 
round number $1,400,000, set aside in the prospectus as 
the alleged purchase price. Of course it would be unfair 
to presume that men like Mr. Cammel in Great Britain, 
or Messrs. J. B. Crockett and Laton of San Francisco, 
were aware of the true inwardness of the scheme. Their 
names being attached to the prospectus is proof sufficient 
of that. Extremes meet all over this wonderful document, 
from the 1395 acreage given as the estimate of eleven 
quartz claims, some not even the full statutory twenty 

9, down to the grotesque value of 12 asked for 

10,000,000 tons of quartz, worth by estimate $88,000,000 in 
gold, the low price itself being a gross exaggeration over 
at which the property could be handled direct 
from the owners' hands in this State. The absurd features 
of the scheme ought in themselves to be sufficient warning 
for the most gullible investor. People who would buy 
such shares on the basis of something for nothing, belong 
to the class of individuals for whose benefit paste dia- 
monds were invented. 

When the gold fever broke out again 
Dead Sea Fruit on the reported discoveries on the Yu- 
in Far-off Peru, kon, the Peruvian districts of Sandia 
and Carabaya had an inning. Some 
one expressed surprise that more attention was not paid 
to these localities, and away went the "tenderfoot." Since 
then we have been indulged with the usual experiences of 
hard luck. The p 1 9 at Piquitiri, which were pay- 

ing so splendidly, and the quartz ledges which assayed 
down to 35 ounces per ton, have been visited by the tour- 
ists and found poor en riant an expeditious home 
trip, with expenses to charge up to profit and loss account. 
Another bubble burst. 



Business continues dull on the Pine-St. 

Dull Times on market. There is no demand for stocks. 

Pine Street. and, fortunately for the maintenance of 

values, offerings are light. The brokers 
are now face to face with the most serious proposition they 
have ever been called upon to discuss in the history of the 
Exchange. They are now forced to decide upon some 
active and progressive policy, after drifting haphazard 
and inert for years, until at last they find themselves en- 
tangled in the eddies of a maelstrom threatening certain 
destruction. It is doubtful if they will be able to develop 
enough will power to stem the current, bearing ihem 
steadily onward to their fate. While there are men of 
energy and dash in the Board capable of coping with an 
emergency of the kind, it will be something new if their 
hands are not tied by the weaker brethren who live cow- 
ering as if from some invisible lash, afraid to do anything, 
let alone open their mouths in complaint. Still, there is 
no telling what they might do in a spirit of desperation, 
and it is only to the chances in this respect that any feel- 
ing of hope in the future is due. It is pitiable to note the 
slow but sure decay of what was once upon a time the 
most prosperous and lucrative of any business in the finan- 
cial line. With it have waned the fortunes of the town. 
Some people may question this assertion, but those who do 
so either are late comers, or they belong to that class who, 
while possessed of eyes, see not. That the brokers are 
almost entirely to blame for the disintegration of their 
business is still the most deplorable feature of the case. 

Judging from the following Canadian dis- 
A Case Where patch now working its way through the 
Doctors Differ. English press, they hold a very high 
opinion of us on the other side of the line: 
"The United States should not be alarmed, or profess to 
be alarmed, about a Klondike famine. There is probably 
an ulterior motive behind the appropriation of $200,000 
by Congress for relief in Alaska. There are very few 
people in Alaska in those latitudes, and Congress knows 
this very well. The people in Klondike are ou Canadian 
territory, aud the Canadian authorities are quite able and 
willing to take care of them. Any shortage of food up 
there will not occur, if at all, until March or April, and 
the shortage even then would not apply to more than one- 
tenth of the population. Major Walsh will attend to this 
effectively in good time. There will be no food famine. At 
the same time no one can object to Congress sending a re- 
lief expedition to their own territory, except to offer the 
remark that it looks peculiar, when there are very few 
persons on the American side of the boundary." This would 
seem to dispose of satisfactorily a bone of contention be- 
tween representatives of the local press, did it not at the 
same time do away with the necessity for choice, artistic 
work, pro and con, with the shadowy spectre Death on 
one hand and a vale of blissful contentment and prosper- 
ity on another. 

The appraisement of the Fair es- 
The Fair Estate and tate throws some light upon the 
Stock Quotations. values of certain stocks, the quota- 
tions of which in public are rare. 
For example, Selbv Smelting and Lead is quoted at $145; 
Fulton Works at $75; Golden City Chemical Works, $18J: 
Mutual Savings Bank, $32}; and the Pacific Rolling Mills 
at $3. Shares of the old Morgan Mine, which has been 
closed down for many years, are valued at over $4 per 
share. The bulk of the personality consists of railroad 
stocks and bonds. Not a share of Comstock appears on 
the list, although many people believed, or affected to be- 
lieve, that the Senator had more or less interest in the 
mines up to the hour of his death. A break in the mar- 
ket at that time was accredited to this cause. So much 
for talk. 

SIXTY miles of steel rails for the E. P. & N. E. are in 
the Ft. Bliss, New Mexico, yards. Nearly thirty 
miles of the grade is completed, and by March 1st the 
road wi:i be completed to the Jarilla mining district, 
thirty-five miles south of La Luz. 

THE latest northern flotation is the Klondyke Champs 
d'Or syndicate. All nationalities are getting in their 
work while snow flies. 



January 22, 1898. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




'Hear the Crier 1" "What the devil art thou I' 
'Onethat wlllplav thedevll.slr.wlthyou." 



THE position of President of the State University is a 
distinguished and honorable one, and it is declared by 
those who have anything to do with that institution that 
instead of Mr. Kellog enjoying the respect of the students 
he has their hearty contempt. It is claimed that he does 
not identify himself either with the professors or students, 
that he is but a very unsatisfactory figurehead, and that 
all disagreements are referred to several committees 
which he has formed, and in fact he has little or no knowl- 
edge of what is being done in the University. It is urged 
by those who have the good of the university at heart that 
a President should be in close touch with both bodies — 
professors and students, but it is said the President takes 
no interest in either. He has been there for several years, 
and during all that time he has not advanced a solitary 
opinion worthy of remembrance, written a paper, or given 
a lecture. One student who has been there three years 
saw him but once when he rolled off his bicycle, and so 
rare is his signature that a co-ed. cut it out of a paper 
which he had posted in the ladies' dressing room begging 
them not to drop hair-pins into the washstand, as it 
clogged the pipes. Another time he formulated a for- 
midable paper ordering all dogs off the campus. It is true 
that at the commencement exercises be gives a dry sta- 
tistical lecture reviewing the work of the past year and 
the numerical advancement in the student body. The only 
people he does take an interest in is the Young Woman's 
Christian Association, to whom be gives nice little Sunday 
school lectures. Now all these sins of omission make the 
students feel that President Kellog really has no heart in 
his work, that he is totally indifferent to the institution, 
and that he is not even in accord with the professors, who 
do not disguise the contempt they have for their official 
head. This is the universal feeling, and such being the 
case, it is a matter for wonder that the Board of Regents, 
who are, it is said, anxious to get rid of Kellog, do not re- 
move him. It is also said that when they reduced his in- 
come $2000, cutting of his entertainment allowance, which 
he coolly pocketed, that it was hoped he would resign — 
but President Martin Kellog is not fashioned on the pat- 
tern which takes a hint — only an abrupt dismissal would 
remove such an incubus. 

DR. Chalmers is the State Quarantine officer, and it ap- 
pears that he is also in the employ of the Examiner, 
or else how came it that he and the yellow journal's re- 
porters went off on an Examiner tug to do the quarantine 
business on the Peru last Sunday night. Of course he 
made a failure of it. The federal official has to attend to 
that. But there is a surmise that the Examiner people 
secured his presence in order to get their men aboard to 
interview Mr. Dole. However, they were left — and there 
was much rejoicing. But what about Dr. Chalmers — will 
he arise and explain ? 

DURING next week there will be hosts of strangers in 
town, as well as Eastern people, and it would be a 
little to the honor of the town if the fruit men would have 
the decency to expose for sale some fairly good fruit. We 
have the reputation of being a great fruit-growing coun- 
try, but the fruit sold at the stalls is simply a disgrace to 
California. Of course that is a matter of little moment to 
the fruit seller, but there should be some measure adopted 
to reach these people. They charge high prices and vend 
fruit which no respectable farmer would think of feeding 
to his hogs. 

DR. Rothermel, the surgeon of that floating lunatic asy- 
lum, the Percy Edwards, is in town. The doctor says 
that if there's a position of certain serpent in an estab- 
lished Eden vacant, he may accept. But he wants no 
more cruising after a shadowy seraglio of hypothetical 
Eves. The cargo of Adams sailed in quest of limited work 
and unlimited wives. There seems to have been a limit to 
everything but to the credulity of the cargo. 



ONE of the most fashionable fads in society to-day is 
riding. Horse talk too is the most fashionable kind 
of conversation and a girl will discourse on the pasterns 
of a horse without the faintest idea of what it means. But 
it is all very nice and interesting. Young men get them- 
selves up in leg of mutton pantaloons and correct costume 
and look supremely unhappy when aboard the horse. But 
it is the go — even if you have to break your neck or take 
your meals standing after a walk through the park. But 
with all this the young lady who was on a Sutter street 
car late one night this week, in her riding habit with four 
great pieces of plaster athwart her cheek, can hardly be 
said to have looked fascinating, though she seemed 
thoroughly pleased at the attention she attracted by her 
trousers and her rather neatly-shod feet. Eleven o'clock 
at night and in riding costume can hardly be said to be the 
correct thing — even for a San Francisco girl. 

LIEUTENANT Noble of the United States Army in- 
formed President Dole of the Hawaiian Republic lhat 
the entire army was in favor of annexation. No doubt, 
Mr. Noble, no doubt. There can be had happy times over 
in the islands. Judging from all accounts there are several 
ladies over there who do not care who they entertain so 
Inrjy as a man wears brass butions. A new army post Mr. 
Noble — new fortifications Mr. Noble — and a squad of officers 
to fascinate women with the eorgeousness of their uni- 
forms, and their supreme kindness in never refu:-ing an 
invitation either to a dance or to a drink. No wonder the 
army wants annexation. There are pleasures even in poi, 
and Honolulu would be pie for many an impecunious 
subaltern. 

THE proletariat declares with what truth it is unknown, 
that it has no interest in the coming celebration, and 
that the merchants of San Francisco are a supremely 
selfish set, and whenever they have a chance they buy 
East and do not give the poor men of the city a chance. 
The poor man vows that the merchants who are decorat- 
ing the streets with those extremely artistic banners have 
bought them in the East because they could be secured at 
less cost than here. This is a bad feeling to entertains and 
whether it is right or wrong that is what the plain people 
think and say. Let the merchants deny the accusation. 

ON Eddy street there is a club of freaks. They are 
spiritualists, anarchists, nihilists, socialists, dam- 
Xjhoolists, and whosoever maketh and loveth a fad. Any 
member caught talking about anything he understands is 
fined. There hasn't been one breach of parliamentary de- 
corum since this collection in natural history was launched. 
The chairman is a specialist in emotional insanity. He is, 
we understand, going to publish the result of his chair- 
manship. The work will be entitled "Twelve Months in 
Bedlam: or, What I Know About Knownothings." 

1V/T R. Shain collects bad debts. He also collects several 
I 1 drunks under one head. When inspired he stands on 
his head and kicks the pictures off the walls. Mrs. Shain 
objects. One night, clad in fleecy white, the gentleman 
arose; then fled away like quicksilver into the gloom. 
Mrs. Shain, under a heavy press of canvas, overtook the 
hilarious levanter, and towed him back to his anchorage. 
Now she has a divorce. 

LORD help the wayfarer on the Waterfront if it rains 
steadily for a week. The streets in that delectable 
quarter of town are now seas of mud. What they will be 
if we should have a steady downp >ur can only be left to the 
imagination. It is a wonder that some of the foreign 
sailors who have to come to this port are not drowned in 
liquid mud while trying to reach their vessels after sun- 
down. 
IN rags, fragrance, and dirt, our court rooms suggest 
the general resurrection. A dirty nigger is no dream 
of Araby the Blest. But compared to our hydrophobic, 
jury hunting, court-room loafing, perambulating sample 
of real estate, the unbaptized colored brother is a sachet 
bag. A dose of ventilation would give that City Hall 
zoological collection lock jaw. 

^ CHARMING girl, speaking of an officer of the Pre- 
sidio the other evening, said: " He is handsome, cour- 
teous, and soldierlike. But whenever he bows I mentally 
ejaculate, ' Lord have mercy upon him and incline his sus- 
penders to keep their contract.' " 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER- 



January 22, 1898. 



BANKING. 



Bank of California, San francteGO. 

Capital and Surplus. S6.OOU.000 

WILLIAM ALVORD President i CHARLES R. BISHOP. Vlce-Prea't 

ALLEN M.CLAY Secretary THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

5. PRBRTI88 Smith.. Ass't Cashier 1 1. F. Moclton 2d Ass't Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS 
New Yobk— Messrs. Laldlaw & Co.; the Bank of New Yorta, N. B. A. 
Baltimobe— The National Exchange Bank Boston— The Tremont Na- 
tional Bank; Chicaoo— Illinois Trust and Savings Bank; Union National 
Bank. Philadelphia— National Bank of the Republic St Lodis— Boat 
man's Bank. Virginia City iNev.)- Agency or The Bank of California 
London— Messrs. N. M. Rothschild A Sons; Paris— Messrs. de Roths 
child Freres Berlin— Direction der Disconto UeselUchaft. China, 
Japan and East Indies— Chartered Bank of India. Australia and China 
Australia and New Zealand— The Union Bank of Australia, Ltd., and 
Bank of New Zealand. 
Letters of Credit Issued available In all parts of the world. 

California Sate Deposit and Trust GomDanu. 

Cor California and Montgomery Sts. 
Capital Fully Paid II UOU.000 

Transacts a general banking business 
and allows Interest on deposits payable on demand or after notice 

Acts as Executor, Administrator, and Trustee under wills or in any 
other trust capacity. Wills are drawn by the company's attorneys and 
are taken care of without charge. 

SATE DEPOSIT BOXES to rent at prices from $5 per annum up- 
ward according to size, and valuables of all kinds are stored at low rates. 

Directors: J D. Fry, Henry Williams, 1. O. Wicken-bam. J»cob C. 
Johnson, James Treadwell, F. W. Lougee. Henry F. Fortmann, R B. Wal- 
lace. R D. Fry, A. D. Sharon and J Dalzell Brown. 

Ofpicer^: J. D Fry, President; Henry Williams. Vice-President; R. 
D Fry, Second Vice-President; J Dalzell Brown, Secretary and Treas- 
urer; E E.Shotwell, Assistant Secretary; Gunnison, Booth & Barinett, 
Attorneys. 

London, Paris and American Bank, Limited. 

N.W. Cor. Sansome * scttkh sts. 

Subscribed Capital I2.5UU.U00 

Paid Dp Capital S2.uuu.uuu 

ReserveFund I 850,000 

Head Oppice 40Threadneedle Street, London, E. C 

AGENTS— New York— Agency of the London, Paris, and American 
Bank Limited, No. 10 Wall Street, N. Y. Paris— Messrs. Lazard, Freres 

6, Cle, 17 Boulevard Poissonlere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the 
world. Commercial and Travelers 1 Credits Issued. 

SIG. GREENEBAUM 1 Manaf , er8 
C. ALTSCHUL J managers. 

GroGker- Wool worth National Bank of S. F. 

Corner Market, Montgomery, 

and Post Streets. 

Paid-Dp Capital 11,000,000 

WM . H. CROCKER President 

W. E. BROWN Vice-President 

OEO. W.KLINE Cashier 

Directors— Henry T. Scott, E. B. Pond, Hy. J.Crocker, Geo. W. Scott. 

The San Francisco National Bank, 

Southeast Corner of Pine and Sansome streets, S. F. 

Jas. K. Wilson, President. E A. Bruqcierb, Vice-President. 

Lewis I. Cowgill, Cashier. 

Capital $500,000 

Directors: Jas. K. Wilson, E J Staples, Wm Pierce Johnson, Geo. 
A. Pope. E. A. Bruguiere, Ed. G. Lukeus, Charles C. JuJson. 

Agents: New York— Hanov. r National Bank, Chase National Bank; 
Boston— National Bank of the Commonwealth. Philadelphia— Drexel & 
Co. Chicago— Continental National Bank. St. Louis— The Mechanics' 
Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London— Brown. Shipley &. 
Co. Paris— Morgan, Harjes & Co. 

Mutual Savings Bank 0? San Francisco. 

33 Post Street, below Kearny, Mechanics' Institute Building. 
Guaranteed Capital 11,000,000 Paid-Up Capital 1300,000 

JAMES D. PHELAN. President. S. G. MTJRPHY, Vice-President. 
GEO. A. STORY. Cashier. JOHN A. HOOPER, Vice-President 

Directors— J ameB D. Phelan, L. P. Drexler, John A. Hooper, C. G. 
Hooker, James Moffltt, S. G. Murphy, Frank J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy, 
and Joseph D. Grant. 

Interest paid on Deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order, Wells, Fargo & Co., or Exchange 
on City Banks. When opening accounts send slgnatuie. 



San Francisco Savings Union. 



Corner California and Webb Streets. 

Deposits. Dec. 31, 1805 t24,4tt.3£7 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus ... l,67VA8l 
ALBERT MILLER. President I E B POND, Vice-President 
Dirkctops— Thomas Magee, O. W. Beaver, Philip Barth. Daniel E. Mar- 
tin, W. C. B. De Fremery, George C Uoardman, Robert Watt; Lovell 
White, Cashier. 

Receives Deposits, and Loans only on real estate security. Country 
remittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by check of reliable 
parties, payable In San Francisco, but tbe responsibility of this Savings 
Bank commences only with the actual receipt of the money. Tbe signature 
of the depositor should accompany the tlrst deposit No charge Is made for 

rtass-book or entrance fee. Onice hours— y. a. m. to S P. m. Saturday even- 
ngs.«:S0to8 




A Manual of Mental Science for Teachers and Sludents, or, Child- 
hood: its character and culture. By Jessie A. Fowler. Illus- 
trated. Published bv L. N. Fowler & Co., London and New 
York. 

This book contains a condensed account of the various 
bones of the skull, the important parts of the brain, the 
temperaments, the location of the various faculties, and 
their outward signs. There are several photographs of 
children, showing the possession of a love of order, self- 
esteem, secretiveness, sense of tune, and other faculties. 
A great part of the book is written in the horrible ques- 
tion and-answer manner, in which Lucy and Robbie reel 
off with utter unconcern the most learned and involved re- 
plies to the questions put by the teacher. The book is 
written with no literary skill, instruction and exposition 
being mixed up with commonplace remarks on conduct or 
reflections on life, quotations from the works of poets and 
essayists, and endless strings of sesquipedalian words. It 
is hard to see how any teacher could teach better, or any 
student learn more easily, by the perusal of a book, whole 
pages of which are mere listsof such sweet things as "The 
Inter-peduncular space : the posterior perforated space : 
the pituitary body, and the anterior perforated spots." 
And of what use to any human being is an inane remark 
such as, "The zoologist, ornithologist, botanist, mineralo- 
gist, geologist, chemist, and geographer, would be practi- 
cally at a loss were they to lose their faculties. " It is cer- 
tainly hard to see how anybody, whether an 'ologist or a 
plain, every-day man, could "lose" a thing without suffer- 
ing a "loss." And what in the world does " practimlly at 
a loss" mean? Does it mean that, while he might still 
speculate on botany, chemistry, or zoology, he could not 
practice those sciences ? The latter part of the book 
gives instructions for noting and recording the earliest 
signs of intelligence in infants, and seems to attach the 
gravest importance to the age at which a child lirst tastes 
a tomato or an orange, calls its mother "mum-mum'' or 
a cat "bim." And this, too, though it is notorious that 
precocious children are not only hideous nuisances, but 
frequently grow up into stupid adults. The author of this 
queer compilation appears to us to be one of those people 
who never use a one-syllabled or two-syllabled word when 
it is possible to find one with fouror five syllables: to whom 
cats, dogs, and cows are " felines, canines, and bovines," 
and " tempero-sphenoidal " is full of comfort. People, 
however, who care for this sort of thing will find the book 
accurately printed and illustrated with some interesting 
portraits of children. 

A Vintage of Verse, by Clarence Urmy. Published by William 
lloxey at the Sign of the Lark, San Francisco, 1897. 
Of the three-score poems collected in this volume many 
have been published in such periodicals as The Cosmopol- 
itan, Lippincott's, The Overland Monthly, Munsey's, etc. 
The scenes are Californian, as may be gathered from the 
titles: "The Golden Gate," "The Belmont Hills," "The 
Napa Valley." and "The Sierras." Of the descriptive 
verses "As I Came Down Mount Tamalpais" may be taken 
as a fair example, and of the love songs "Mabel's Eyes" is 
a good specimen. Mr. Urmy's verse, though not aiming 
at depth or grandeur, is almost uniformly pretty. He is. 
perhaps, a little ovcrfond of "golden glow," "glimmering 
glens," "sweetest smile." "babbles a bubbling brook," 
"dreams and darkness," "dusky dells," "purple peaks," 
and other such phrases. Alliteration, though an entirely 
legitimate poetic device, may be used too frequently. Mr. 
Urmy, however, possesses a graceful knack of verse- 
making. 



Of El Dorado, by Howard Clyndon. 
Co.. San Francisco, 1 S97. 



Published by C. A. Mardock & 



" Howard Glvndon " Is the nom <U r/um-r of Mrs. Laura 
C. Redden Searing, the author of "The Hills of Santa 
Cruz," which was spoken of by John G. Whittier as "a 



January 22, 1898. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



»5 



lyric which would do honor to any magazine; fine iu con- 
ception and felicitous in expression." Words of praise 
from the well-known are always pleasant, though it by no 
means necessarily follows that a man who writes poetry 
himself is a good judge of the efforts of other people. How- 
ever, we are ourselves disposed to like "The Hills of Santa 
Cruz" at least as well as the other poems in the volume, 
which are all Californian. and deal with such subjects as 
"Del Monte." "Capitols," "December iu California," 
"May in California," etc. Mrs. Searing has a sense of 
melody, and an appreciation of the beauty of nature. Occa- 
sionally the rhythm of her lines seems to halt a little, aud 
there is one strange rime . 

"Its golden secret for you destined, 

* * # 

To have what the others could not find." 

It seems impossible to avoid the conclusion that "Howard 
Glyndon" pronounces "destined" as though it rimed with 
kind. The little volume, with its baker's dozen of poems, 
is printed on good paper, and encased in an olive-green 
cover. 

We have received a circular letter from The American 
Publishers' Association, from which we are glad to learn 
that "as a notable personage our name has been deemed 
worthy of representation in the Encyclopaedia of American 
Biography of the Nineteenth Century." We are requested 
to fill up a blank giving names in full, residence, date and 
place of birth, schools at which educated, positions held, 
and any other facts deemed important. On completion 
of the work, in the fall of 1S98 or later, we are to receive 
a copy of the Encyclopaedia, wherein our name will appear 
alongside of Longfellow, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Lowell, 
and other men of note. On delivery of the volume we are 
to "pungle up" ten dollars. There is no chance of. our 
name not appearing in the Encyclopaedia on account of our 
not being sufficiently notable, for we observe that the 
order for the book .is "to be void in case the subscriber is 
not represented iu the work:" we understand "represen- 
ted" here to mean "mentioned." The publishers have had 
experience in work of this sort, for they have already 
issued "Poets of America," containing "upwards of 800 
portraits of local and national poets, also biographical 
sketches and choice selections from more than a thousand 
living American poets." The American Publishers' As- 
sociation is also responsible for volumes entitled "The 
Poets and Poetry of Kansas," ditto of Iowa, ditto of 
Nebraska, ditto of Wisconsin, etc. The field for enter- 
prise of this sort seems very wide, and is evidently profit- 
able. We learn with pleasure that we are "a notable 
personage," and that "it will be to our permanent advan- 
tage and a source of satisfaction" to the A. P. A. above 
mentioned if we will give this matter immediate attention, 
but we have not yet filled up the order blank for this in- 
valuable work. 

The January or holiday issue of The Land of Sunshine 
has a clever little article by Grace Ellery Channing on 
"La Cabana," the rough, thatched cabin built of reeds 
and open at one end that is found on the beaches of 
Mediterranean seaside resorts. There you may sit, read, 
write, work, or rest, sheltered from the glare of the sun, 
and keep an eye upon children sporting and digging in the 
sand. "A neglected corner" is a description of the 
Mission Dolores graveyard, by Idah M. Strobridge, with 
photographs of the church, and of the tombs of Luis 
Antonio Arguello, the first Governor of Alta California, 
and of J. P. Casey, who shot James King of William. In the 
editorial department entitled "In the Lion's Den" Mr. C. 
P. Lummis performs a dance over the grave of the late 
lamented Professor Wm. Libbey of Princeton, who con- 
trived to display more ignorance in less time than one would 
have supposed possible. Mr. Lummis defends the Spanish 
from the wild charges of atrocity and brutality made against 
them by newspaper correspondents ignorant alike of "the 
language, the people, or the truth." Yet men of this 
sort manufacture that much-lauded thing called "public 
opinion." The last article in the issue is an illustrated 
description of the Sutro Baths by Ella M. Sexton, some- 
what statistical, and rather glowingly eulogistic of the ex- 
Mayor, but not uninteresting. 



Nobody ever complains of 
Macbeth lamp-chimneys. 

They give a good deal more 
light and don't break. 

Get the Index. 

Write Macbeth Pittsburgh Pa 



BANKING. 



Bank of British Columbia. 

Southeast cor. Bush and sansome Sts. 
Incorporated by Royal Charter, 1862. 

Capital Paid Up $3,000,000 

Reserve Fund t 600,000 

HEAD OFFICE 60 Lombard Street, London 

Branches— Victoria, Vancouver, New Westminster, Kamloops, Nan- 
lamo, Nelson, Sandon, and Kaslo, British Columbia; Portland, Oregon. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direot at current rates 
upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents, as follows : 

New York— Merchants' Bank of Canada; Chicago— First National Bank ; 
Liverpool— North and South Wales Bank; Scotland— British Linen 
Company; Ireland— Bank of Ireland; Mexico— London Bank of Mexico ; 
South America— London Bank of Mexico and South America ; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China; Australia and 
New Zealand— Bank of Australasia and Commercial Banking Company ot 
Sydney, Ld; Demeraha and Trinidad (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 

The Anglo- Galifornian Bank, Limited. 

Capital authorized... 16,000,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 

Paid Up 1,600,000 

Keserve Fund 700,000 

N. E. Cob. Pine ahd Sansome Sts 
Head Office— 18 Austin Friars. London, E. C. 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Seligman & Co., 21 Broad street. 

The Bank transacts a General Banking Business, sells drafts, makes 

telegraphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the 

world. Sends bills* 'or collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 

and bullion. IGN. STEINHART I „....„. 

P. N. LILIENTHAL, / Managers 

The German Savings and Loan Society. 

No. 526 California Street. San Francisco 
Guarantee capital and surplus — $3,109,000 99 
Capital actually paid up in cash.. 1.000 000 00 

DepositB December 31, 1807 28,-;69.633 36 

OFFICERS: President, B A.Becker; First Vice-President, Daniel 
Meyer; Second Vice-President, H. Horstman; Cashier, A. H. R Schmidt; 
Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann; Secretary. George Tourny ; Assist- 
ant Secretary, A. H Muller; Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS: B A Becker. Daniel Meyer. H. Ilorst- 
mann, Ign. Stelnhart, N. Van Bergen, E. Rohte, H. B. Russ, D. N. 
Walter and N. Ohlandt. 

Wells Fargo & Go.'s Bank. 

N. E. Corner Sansome & Sutter Streets 

John J. Valentine President 

Homer S. King Manager 

H. Wadsworth Cashier 

F. L. Lipman Assistant Cashier 

Cash Capital and Surplus 16,250,000 

BRANCHES. 
N. Y. City.H. B. Parsons, Cashier. | Salt Lake City. J. E. Dooly, Cashier 
Portland, Or.. R M. Dooly, Cashier, 
Directors — John J. Valentine, Benj. P. Cheney, Oliver Eldridge, Henry 

E. Huntington, Homer S. King, George E. Gray, John J. McCook, John 
Bermingham, Dudley Evans. 

SW1S8 America!! Bank OfLOCARNO, Switzerland, and 

California Mortgage & Savings Bank, %££?gf! K ' 

Paid up Capital and Reserves. $620 000. 

A general savings and commercial banking business transacted. Inter- 
est paid on saviogs deposits. Loans on approved. real estate security, and 
on commercial paper. 

DIRECTORS— Ernst A. Denicke, A. Sbarboro J. C. Rued, E. Martlnoni, 

F. C. Siebe. A. Tognazzini, H Brunner, McD R. Venable, A. G. Wieland, 
F. Kronenberg. Charles Martin, C. Gehret, P. Tognazzini, S. Grandl. 

Securitu Savings Bank. 

222 Montgomery St.. Mills Building. 
INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. 
LOANS MADE. 

DIRECTORS. 

William Alvord 3. L. Abbot Jr. H. H. Hewlett 

Wm. Babcook O. D. Baldwin E. J. McCutohen 

Adam Grant W. S. Jones R. H. Pease 

HUMBOLDT SAVINGS ftND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 18 Geary Street. 

Directors: Adolph C. Weber, President; W. J. Lowry, Vice-Presi- 
dent; ErnestBrand, Secretary; W. S. Keyes; I. Kohn; G. H. Luchsinger; 
C. E. Hatch, Attorney. 



i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 22, 1898. 




UNBEAMSB 



Sm»n Daughter — It's most school time, and I've mislaid 
my geography. Cultured Mother— Well, tell me what 
the lesson is about, and I'll write out the answer for you 
to learn. Small Daughter— The lakes of Africa. Cul- 
tured Mother— Um — er — if you've mislaid /our geo- 
graphy, you careless child, you can just hunt till you rind 
it.— New York Weekly. 

"I noticed several cases of mineral water going into the 
Lushers'. What do they want of all that stuff?" "Why, 
you see, Mr. Lusher has sworn off, but he's got the cork- 
screw habit so firmly fixed on him that he must have some- 
thing to work on." — Cleveland Plain Dealer. 

'W« have parted," said the girl with the high brow. 
"You don't mean it!" "Yes; it had to be. He developed 
a flippancy I had never before suspected. He spnke of — 
of — er — the author of 'Quo Vadis' as 'Snickelfrilz.' "— - 
Cincinnati Enquirer. 

"now, boys, two cab drivers start at the same time, 
the first 100 yards in front of the second, but the second 
drives 10 yards more in every minute than the first. 
Where will they meet?" "At the first public house, sir." 
— Londun Figaro. 

"Coope.'s works?" replied the shopman. "Yes, 
madame; here are the 'Leatherstocking Tales.' " "I don't 
think I want them," replied the shopper. "Hasn't Mr. 
Cmper written any 'Golf-Stocking Tales' yet?" — Harper's 
Bazar. 

Judge— Witness, you are 40 years of age? Female 
Witness — Yes, alas! One gets older every day. And 
yet I was young once (heaving a sigb). Ah, your lordship 
would hardly believe how young I was. — Bangor News. 

Oimsonbeak — You poets are an ungrateful lot. 
Rvmington — Why so? "A man invented bullet proof 
clothiotr, six months ago, and not one of you fellows has 
sung his praises in verse." — Yonkers Statesman. 

"The chief difference between the man with a lot of new- 
made money and the gentle zephyr," said the Cornfed 
Philosopher, "is that the gentle zephyr blows itself 
quietly." — Indianapolis Journal. 

"Mrs Struckett affects the antique in her house decora- 
tion " "Yes, she told me the other day she was heart- 
broken becau-e she couldn't net the shades of her ancestors 
for her parlor windows."— Truth. 

Mistress — Do you call this sponge cake? Why, it's as 
hard as it can be. New Cook — Yes, mum; that's the way 
a sponire is before it's wet. Soak it in your tea, mum. — 
Boston Traveler. 

Smithers ( just returned from Europe) — Waiter, gimme 
some if that fromage de Brie cheese and a small cup of 
demitasse. Waiter— Noir? Smithers — No, black. — 
Criterion. 

Brideg'ooi> — Where shall we go, dearest, Niagara Falls 
or Washington? Bride— We might go to both places and 
see which we like best. — Brooklyn Life. 

Buyer — Is this dog affectionate? Dealer — I should say 
so! I have sold him four times, and every time he comes 
right back to me.— Fliegende Blaetter. 

"Pcor Timmie! Foive years in Sing Sing. I do feel 
shorry for him." "Bedad, an' yure shympathy's trowed 
away. He's surrounded by frinds." — Harlem Life. 

M as Etnei — I wonder if that gentleman can hear me 
when I sing? Maid— Of course, he can. He is closing 
the window already. — Tit-Bits. 

"Eastern society women are being photographed in their 
nightdresses." "How modest!'— Chicago Record. 

Askins — How is the best wav to tell a woman's age? 
Grisishaw— By proxy.— New York Journal. 

The ,'tudy of figures is usually dry even when applied to Ihe wet- 
test rohjcot. But figures will boow that J. F. Cutter and Argonaut 
whiskies are drunk more than any niher liquors in ibe whole r, un- 
try Everybody likes J. ». Cotter and Argonaut. E Martin <t Co. 
at 411 Market street, are sole agents for the Pacific Coast. 



Scott's Emulsion is not a 
"baby food," but is a most 
excellent food for babies 
who are not well nourished. 

A part of a teaspoonful 
mixed in milk and given 
every three or four hours, 
will give the most happy 
results. 

The cod-liver oil with the 
hypophosphites added, as in 
this palatable emulsion, not 
only to feeds the child, but 
also regulates its digestive 
functions. 

Ask. your doctor about this. 

50c. and $1.00 ; all druggists. 
SCOTT & BOW.NE, Chcmibts, New York. 



GRAY BROS., 



316 Montgomery St., S. P. 

•zOb New High St.. Los Angeles. 



fi oncrete and . . . 
Artificial Stone Work. 



THE PAPER 



on which the News Letter 
Is printed is supplied by . . 

fl. ZELLERBflGH & SONS, 

t PAPER DEALERS. 

416-418 420 Sansome street, n. e. cor. Commercial: 419 421-123 Clay street; 
418 ■*;» Commercial street San Francisco. Telephone Main 1 134. 

DR. BYRON W. MAIMES 



14 Grant Avenue 
Rooms 16-17-18-19 



Dentist 



Dr. FRANK C. PAGUE, 

Dentist 

Has removed nis office to the Spring Valley Water Works Building Geary 
and Stockton streets, southeast corner, S. F. Rooms 3, 5, and 7. 



DR. d. NICHOLS, 



(Formerly County Physician of Amador County.) 

Office: -;l Powell street, oornei Powell and Ellis. Residence, 

Baldwin Hotel. S. F. Hours : 1 to 4 p. m ; 7 to 8 p. m. 



dOHN E. RICHARDS, Law Offices, 

Removed from Crocker Building lo 404-405 4C6 Claus Spreckels Bldg. 
Telephone Main 5415. San Francisco. 

The HOTEL RICHELIEU, &Wu. v &SE 

Principal and finest family hotel of Sao Francisco. 

Hotel Richelieu Go. 

THE OPIUM AND MORPHINE HABIT. 

• What We May Do to be Saved" is a little book. 
giving full particular)) «>f a rellablecure, Pree 

l>r. J. L. Stephens, I>ept. B.,Lebanuii,OUm. 

has no shading; it has connective 

Lslflllt'LlllG Otl0rttl3fl(l isVlmpie. legible and° fast as the 

fastest Full personal course, S25; 
by mail $i5; flrst-clasR referpnees: descriptive ' Sketch " free 
KOsCOk: L EAMKS. Room 556 Purrott Building; telephone Jessie 1011 



January 22. 1898 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



IN SUR ANCE 

M AXAGERS of the life companies in this city and their 
J l attorneys have spent several days during the pres- 
ent week in the office of Commissioner Clunie discussing 
the laws of the State under which thev are operating. As 
is well known, the Commissioner is makintr an effort to in- 
terpret existing statutes in a manner unlike his predeces- 
sors, and this conference was suggested bv him to deter- 
mine the present status, and if it be found that the laws 
are defective, for the additional purpose of having such 
emendations and elucidations as may be evolved from the 
prolific brains of the next Legislature. 

Manager George L. North, of the Provident Savings 
Life, is away establishing agencies for his company. 

The returns of the different fire insurance companies, 
just filed with the Commissioner, show that business on the 
Coast was generally profitable for the past year. The life 
companies also made large gains during the year. 

President Osborn, of the Fire Underwriters Associa- 
tion, has issued a circular letter to the local agents 
inviting them to be present at the annual meeting, which 
takes place next month. 

At the monthly meeting of the San Francisco Life Asso- 
ciation, held this week, Charles A. McLane was elected 
president, succeeding Clarence M. Smith; John Kilgarif, 
vice-president; secretary, G. F. Stolp ; treasurer, W. H. 
Dunphy. 

Philip Bolger, formerly manager of the London Guaran- 
tee and Accident, has accepted a position with the Frank- 
fort Accident Plate Glass, under Voss, Conrad & Co., as 
claims adjuster. 

W. R. Sloane, a prominent casualty man of Salt Lake 
City, spent several days in the city this week. 

M. R. Higgins, ex-insurance commissioner, now with the 
Pacific Mutual, returned from the East. 

Manager Wayman, of the Delaware, has moved into the 
offices recently vacated by the Pacific Surety. 

The Pacific Coast field of the Royal Exchange has been 
cut in two by United States Manager Robert Dickson. 
The northern district will have Portland for its head- 
quarters, and will be under the management of Edward 
Hall, who, for several years has been the company's chief 
special in the northwest, and was formerly secretary of 
the Oregon Fire. Manager Hall will report to New York. 
The southern district will have its headquarters in San 
Francisco, and will be in charge of Frank Dickson, who 
has long been identified with the Coast department, and 
is a brother of Robert Dickson. The new management 
went into effect January 1st. 

Insurance Superintendent Van Cleave of Illinois has 
rendered a decision that it is a violation of the law for an 
insurance company to print upon the back of its policy, or 
upon its advertising matter, any other than its corporate 
name, and that if it is a joint policy issued by two or more 
companies, it can only use on its policy and advertising 
matter the corporate name of the several companies issu- 
ing such policy. 

Mr. John Wanamaker thus summarizes the grounds of 
his belief in life insurance as a business proposition: 

"I was insurable and accident or ill-health might come 
at any moment when I would not be insurable. Other 
reasons are that life insurance is one of the best forms of 
investments because it gives, after one deposit, an in- 
stant guarantee that may repay principal and interest 
and more. Life insurance in the long run is a saving fund 
that not only saves and takes care of my deposits, but 
takes me into partnership not infrequently returning 
premiums with interest and profit. Life insurance re- 
garded from the standpoint of quick termination is more 
profitable than any other investment I could make for my 
estate. It enables a man to give away all he wishes dur- 
ing his lifetime and still make such an estate as he cares 
to leave." 

The Genuine '.' brown's Bronchial Troches" are sold only In boxes. 
They are wonderfully effective fo- Coughs and Throat Troubles. 

TUC I inM FIRE INSURANCE CO . Limited, of London. 
Int LIUH Total o»fh assets in United States, 888a,797 09 

TUC IMDCDIAi INSURANCE CO. Limited, of London. 
Int MVIrtnlAL Established on Pacific Coast in 1852. 

WILLIAM J LANDERS Resident Manager. 
Pacific Coast Branoh : 205-307 Sansome St., San Franoisco, Oal. 



H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS 

Fite and Marine Insurance Agents, 

309 ana 311 Sansome St. • • ■ San Francisco, Cal 

CORRESPONDENTS : 

FINDLAY, DURHAM & BRODIE 43 and <8Threadneedle St.. London 

SIMPSON. MACK1RDY & CO 28 South Castle St., Liverpool 

INSURANCE. 



FIRE, MARINE. AND INLAND INSURANCE. 



Firemans Fund 



INSURANCE COMPANY, OF SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 

Capital, $1,000,000. Assets, $3,500,000. 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited), OF MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 
SOLID SECURITY. OVER $9,000,000.00 RESOURCES 

CHAS. A. LATON, Manager. 439 California St., S. F. 
Fire Insurance. 

CONNECTICUT FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF HARTFORD. 

Capital Paid Up 11,000,000 

Assets 3.800,018 

Surplus to Polloy Holders t.668,332 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager. 
COLIN M. BOYD. N. W Cor. Sioramento and Montgomery Sts., S. F. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSURANCE CO., LIMITED, 

OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital 16.700,0011 

BALFOUR. GUTHRIE & CO., Agents. 

No. 316 California St., S. F 

Founded A. D 17J2 

Insurance Company of North America 

OF PHILADELPHIA, FENN. 

Paid up Capital 13,000,000 

Surplus to Policy Holders 5,022,016 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent, 412 California St., S. F 

PHOENIX ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON Established™. 
PROVIDENCE-WASHINGTON INSURANCE CO. incorporate* m> 

BUTLER & H ALDAN, General Agents, 

413 California St., S. F. 

THE THURINGIA INSURANCE COMPANY. 

Of ERFURT, GERMANY. 
Capital. 82,250.000 Assets. $10,984,248. 
Pacific Coast Department : 204-208 SANSOME ST., S. F. 

VOSS. CONRAD & CO., General Managers. 

Accident Employers Liability and Fidelity Bonds Insurance. 

THE GUARANTORS FINANCE COMPANY OF PHILADELPHIA. 

ARTHUR C DONNELL, Gen. Agent Paolflc Coast. 401 California St. 



i8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 22, 1898. 



^teRfe.Qj}. 



ftFFABILITYon the part of the President of the Island 
republic won all hearts with whom M r. Dole was brought 
in contact during his brief stay in the city. Although he 
evidently expected an official reception here, — the 
Honolulu papers had published an account of the almost 
royal style in which he probably would be received in San 
Francisco, — the fact that he was allowed to arrive and 
depart just like any other traveller, troubled him not a 
whit. 

He received newspapermen with cordial dignity, but 
with none of the ridiculous friendliness of the petty 
politician. Even the reporter for the Call, who on ac- 
count of his paper's attitude toward annexation, crept 
fearfully into the presidential presence, half expecting 
that the Kanaka aide-de-camp, Major Iaukea, would be 
instructed to behead him, was received with just the same 
consideration shown to all the geDtlemen who called to 
pay their respects. 

Rather an amusing incident occurred during the Hawaiian 
President's visit to the I'residio. As he landed from the 
Government military launch, "Gen. McDowell," drawn up 
to receive him on the Presidio wharf was a light battery 
of artillery, and an infantry company, with the regimental 
band. As the presidential foot touched the gang plank, 
the band, according to programme, struck up "Our 
President." 

Wishing to compliment Mr. Dole, Lieutenant Noble re- 
quested the band leader to play the Hawaiian national 
hymn. 

" We are kind of shy on Hawaiian music suitable since 
the revolution," replied the director of trumpets. "But 
we can play the old Royalist hymn!" 

Lieutenant Noble much embarrassed, explained the 
difficulty to President Dole. 

"That's all right, "said the Hawaiian Chief Executive. 

I 'lay the Royalist hymn!" 

And they did. 

* * * 

"We were all sitting around the hotel in Honolulu," said 
Purser McComb of the Australia, "swapping lies and 
stories, when someone started the joke that each man 
present was to tell a moral story or set up the drinks. 
Everybody agreed except Camarinos, a Greek, who is in 
the fruit business there, and reported to be quite wealthy. 

" 'I know lots in Greek.' said Camarinos. 'but I don't 
know any in English.' 

1 i reek don't go here, Camarinos. What do we know 
about your language? You may be giving us a fill and we 
be none the wiser. You must tell it us in English, my son.' 

"Camarinos looked puzzled when his turn came to give a 
philosophical maxim. He put his finger to his forehead 
and then said suddenly, with a bright look, 'I have one.' 

" 'Let us have it,' was the cry. 

' Well, I don't know if I get him quite right,' he 
responded. 

" ' Oh, let's have it.' 

; ' 'Well, then, it is this: A brick which goes this way,' 
waving his hands to and fro, 'catches no grass.' 

" There was a good laugh, and it was voted that Camar- 
inos had told the best story that ever had been heard in 
Honolulu or elsewhere." 

# * * 

Such a superbundance of animal spirits is let loose in 
the Call Board Room of the Produce Exchange, particu- 
larly during the holidays, that practical jokes abound, and 
the butt of the merriment is often made to occupy an ex- 
ceedingly ludicrous position. A favorite pastime is to 
surreptitiously attach to the back of a broker's coat a 
card with a superscription which will render the uncon- 
scious wearer supremely ridiculous. A victim's only 
course, under such circumstances, is to make the best of 
his plight, as any display of wrath will only plunge him in- 
to deeper distress. 

A group of young brokers, one day this week, after a 
glance at the back of Jack de Ruyter's coat, burst into 



roars of laughter. They fairly howled with merriment, 
and waved their index fingers at the amateur dog fancier. 
Soon the entire Board Room was in an uproar and every- 
one on 'Change joined in the amusement. Poor De Ruyter 
grinned and bore it, with the best grace possible, but he 
passed a very uncomfortable half hour. 

At the first opportunity, he slipped out to a convenient 
cloak-room, to remove the inscription. With some curios- 
ity to see the cause of such convulsive amusement, Jack 
removed his coat. To his amazement, neither chalk-mark 
nor paper was attached to it. The garment was just as 
he had put it on that morning. 

Then Jack realized that he had been the victim of what 
the brokers call "a double ender." The joke was itself a 

joke. 

# # # 

The pleasures of small speculations have great attrac- 
tions for Attorney Thomas D. Riordan, whose particular 
fad is the insidious nickel-in-the-slot machine. He experi- 
ments almost daily with the device, for he is an inveterate 
smoker, and all his cigars are secured through the agency 
of "the machine." 

How much more do they cost him that way ? Ah, that 
is another story ! 

A few days ago the attendant at the machine, who was 
not the proprietor, by the way, watched with respectful 
sympathy as Tom played five nickels, each barren of re- 
sults. 

"Ah, two pair, did you say, Mr. Riordan? And aces ? " 
handing down a box of cigars. 

" You are mistaken; I didn't win," said Riordan, much 
surprised. 

Yes, sir ! Here you are," said the attendant, loudly, 
putting three cigars in the speculator's hand, adding lotto 
voce: "What's the matter with you? Do you walk in your 
sleep ? " 

"This is a pretty decent chap," mused the Chinese at- 
torney. " I must try that machine again." 

He dropped in a nickel, and then occurred something 
unknown in the history of nickel-in-the-slot machines — 
ace — king — queen — jack — ten of diamonds ! A royal flush! 
One hundred cigars ! 

" Well," said Riordan, "this appears to be my day! 
Guess I'll have to give you a chance to get even." 

He played four more nickels, and only got twelve addi- 
tional cigars ! 

Riordan turned to his friend Lande. 

" You ' hit' him," he said, indicating the machine. "I 

haven't got the heart ! " 

* * * 

In paying a compliment to ayoung lady, it is well to so 
frame your words that but a single meaning can be de- 
duced, otherwise the flattery may prove to be something 
in the nature of a boomerang. 

One of the buds who burst upon this season's delighted 
vision has a youngish mamma, as charming as herself. In 
a desire to make himself specially acceptable to the hus- 
band and father, that most gallant of soldiers, Lieutenant 
Cloman, said to the wealthy sire, at the family hotel, 
where the latter resides, that his wife and daughter both 
looked remarkably well. 

" It is hard to tell which is the younger," said the suave 
and diplomatic officer. 

Of course, the old man immediately repeated the re- 
mark to his better half. Only, unfortunately, he did not 
repeat the compliment correctly. 

"What do you suppose Cloman has just been saying to 
me. my dear?" he said, with a comfortable smile, anticipa- 
ting that he would arouse the lady's gratified vanity. 
'He says it is hard to tell which is the older, you or our 
daughter!" 

* * * 

Ever since Charles Rollo Peters returned from Europe 
he has remembered with excusable longings the gay 
French capital; and even the fogs of London have an at- 
traction to the artist that make the delights of San Fran- 
cisco and Monterey pall on the taste. Mr. Peters spent 
several years abroad, and with the true eye of an artist 
picked up a quantity of rare old furniture, curios, etc., 
which he brought to this city. Having been selected dur- 
ing the artist's wanderings in out-of-tbe-way and neg- 



January 22, 1898. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



'9 



lected corners of the old world, his collection is extremely 
valuable. As the artist is going to make his home abroad, 
he has determined to give the art buyers of Sau Fran 
Cisco an opportunity to secure a collection, every piece 
of which was personally selected by Mr. Peters and ap- 
proved by a famous Pans expert, so that every article" is 
a rare and valued specimen of its kind. French tapestries 
of the time of Louis XIV, and also German and Italian 
tapestries of exquisite design and very great value, are 
to be seen. In the collection is .1 rare armoire from the 
south of France, made of solid oak of a variety now ex- 
tinct. This piece is of remarkable tone and splendid fin- 
ishings. A Flemish cupboard, an Italian sideboard, and a 
Breton bed, which is certainly a remarkable piece of fur- 
niture, are among the fine pieces of Mr. Peters' collection, 
The Breton bed is a specimen superior to the one in the 
famous Musee Cluny of Paris. It is of pure Breton art — 
the various carved designs being redolent of Brittany, 
where it was rescued from an old farmhouse. It is ex- 
tremely valuable. Breton porcelain and old plate will de- 
light the eye of the lover of these things, and are worth a 
long visit to see. Cut glass wine decanters, water jugs, 
tankards and beer mugs, old French tobacco jars, carved 
Italian chairs, carved ivory crucifix, and old Breton plate, 
arrest the attention on all sides. The hall and three 
rooms at 771 Sutter street are filled with these invaluable 
relics of centuries ago, and they are without doubt the 
most beautiful and rarest furniture and curios ever gath- 
ered under one roof on the Coast. The collection is now 
on exhibition at the number given from 10 to 12 and 2 to i 
o'clock daily. The sale is private; nothing will be dis- 
posed of at auction, and whatever remains unsold at the 
end of this month will be packed up and taken away by 

their owner. 

* * * 

Such a violent display of repartee flashed around the 
Mills Building one Jay this week that a crack was after- 
wards discovered i a the stone pavement, and one of the 
massive granite pillars bad a narrow escape from being 
shattered. Dick Ellert and Denis Kearney were enjoying 
a tete-a-tete on the corner when Bob Mitchell, grand and 
impressive in his usually carefully planned raiment, swept 
up and joined them. 

"Two disreputable gents," remarked Mitchell, senten- 
tiously, with that playful, elephantine humor for which the 
Nevada Demosthenes is remarkable. 

"Three now," corrected the sand-lot agitator. 

"We were just talking of the epidemic of footpads," in- 
terposed Ellert. " Something ought to be done." 

"Why don't the freeholders prohibit their operations in 
the new charter," suggested the smiling attorney. 

" I guess the only way to dispose of them is to reorgan- 
ize the old vigilance committee," put in Denis, violently. 
"Every footpad should be hanged ! " 

"Yes," said Ellert, who had been awaiting his chance 
to get even with Mitchell. "And so should every lawyer 

who defends them ! " 

* * # 

Society has suddenly grown very sensitive, and it be- 
hooves everyone to weigh well his words before he gives 
them utterance. Woe to the man who says what he does 
not mean. A faux pas is a mortal offense, and the vicious 
habit of "jollying," in the first families, is punishable with 
social death. 

Tony Hellman was among the guests at a function in 
honor of the daughter of the house, as one of the oldest 
friends of the young lady's mamma. Several others of the 
aged class were also present, although the majority were 
buds and brownies. Anthony still classes himself as a gay 
young blade, and that is why he made the peculiar Hell- 
manlike remark to his hostess: 

"Rather a mixed crowd!" remarked Tony, blandly, with 
his usual easy smile. 

! "Why, Mr. Hellman, what do you mean?" demanded the 
hostess, plainly ruffled, and with great dignity. 

"Oh, some of them are young, and others— not so 
young," explained the imperturbable stock broker, who is 
not unused to rises and. falls. 

* * * 

A deservedly high reputation for probity and devout- 
ness was always enjoyed by C. T. Blake, the millionaire 



President of the Oakland Street Paving Company. He 
was never absent from his pew in the Congregational 
Church, where he was a model of decorum. As soon as 
the Rev. Mr. Hatch began to preach, Mr, Blake's spec- 
tacles would be pushed up over his forehead, his hands 
would involuntarily fold themselves across his waistcoat, 
and he would reverently dream of the golden pavements in 
a better world. 

Precisely at noon, when the clergyman was discussing 
fourteenthly, out came watch, and the old gentleman 
waited for the mid-day blast which invariably occurred at 
his quarries iu the Oakland foothills. 

If the discharge was on time, the watch closed with a 
snap, and Mr. Blake resumed his peaceful reflections. 
But if there was any delay in that blast at noon on Sunday, 
slumber was abandoned, the capitalist, sitting bolt up- 
right, indignantly glared at the preacher, and the quarry- 
men next day wondered what there could have been in the 
sermon which so "riled the old man." 



ONE of the appreciated novelties of jubilee week will be 
the floral exhibition to be held at Union Square. The 
object of the exhibit is to show strangers who may visit 
the city what has been accomplished in floriculture in a 
half century in this State. A tent 100x30 feet is being 
erected at the square, and booths in it will be in charge of 
prominent ladies of the city. The Square will be bril- 
liantly illuminated. Electric lights will be strung from 
the center to the four corners, and one hundred incandes- 
cent globes, housed in Japanese lanterns, will give a de- 
lightfully picturesque atmosphere to the scene. The ex- 
hibition is under the direction of the Ladies' Club and . 
State Floral Society, and will be one of the most attrac- 
tive features of the celebration. It will be open on Thurs- 
day, Friday, and Saturday of next week. 

Huber's Del Moite Orchestra furnishes the best music for an en- 
tertainment. Telephone: Care Ben]! Curtaz, Main 1247. 



THE German Demokrat has issued a handsome bird's 
eye view of San Francisco, which shows the entire 
sweep of the bay and nearly the entire city. 




Doing- " stunts. 



That seems to be the case with 
ie women who are washing in 
the old way. You can stand on 
>ur head, for instance. Almost 
every one could do it, if it 
were necessary or desirable. 
But standing on the feet is 
more natural and more sen- 
sible — and easier. So with soap and Pearline. 
Everyone can wash with soap-^many do. But 
washing with Pearline is easier and more sen- 
sible. The hard work of soap is neither neces- 
sary nor desirable. Give up the use of soap 
and use Pearline. ma 

T f^f-fcly Peddlers and some unscrupulous grocers will tell you, 
■■— 'vLI-K. " this is as good as" or "the same as Pearline." IT'S 
FALSE — Pearline is never peddled; if your grocer 
sends you an imitation, be honest — send it back. . 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Belcher Silver Mining Company. 
The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Belcher Sil- 
ver Mining Company will be held at the office of the company, room 
37, third floor, Mills Building, San Francisco, Cal., on 

TUESDAY, the 2jth DAY OF JANUARY. 1S98. 
at the hour of t o'clock p. m. , for the purpose of electing a Board of Direc- 
tors to serve for the ensuing year and the transaction of suoh other busi- 
ness as may come before the meeting. 
Transfer books will close on Friday, January 31, J898, at 3 o'clock P.M. 

F. E. DIETZ, Secretary. 
Office-Room 37, third floor Mills Building, N. E. corner Bush and Mont- 
gomery street, San Fra ncisco, Cal. 

WANTED - — Several trustworthy gentlemen or ladles to travel in Cali- 
fornia for established, reliable house. Salary »780 and expenses. 
Steady position. Enclose reference and self addressed stamped envelope. 
The Dominion Company, Dept. 7, Chicago, 111. 



Out 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 22 , 1898. 




STILL more gaieties in prospect for February. Two 
of those mentioned in these columns last week have 
now been announced, and the others will doubtless come to 
time also. 

The reception which Mme. de Guigne will give at the 
residence of her mother, Mrs. Parrott, ou Sutter street, 
promises to be a brilliant function; the rooms are spacious 
and well adapted for entertaining, so there will be plenty 
of room for a large number of guests. 

Mrs. Will Whittier's forthcoming February entertain- 
ment will be a dinner dance, a cotillion following the feast, 
which in turn will be followed by supper. 

Of course the event of this week was the Borel ball at 
Native Sons' Hall on Thursday evening, when Mrs. Borel 
introduced two more of her daughters to the social world 
of San Francisco. It was an elaborate affair in every way; 
the invitation list was enlarged from the one at first made 
until it took in several hundred guests; the decorations 
were profuse; the supper a veritable banquet, and the 
gowns worn by the ladies were all very handsome. Mrs. 
Borel was supported by her daughters in the reception of 
her guests, and the dancing was prolonged until a very 
late hour. 

Mrs. Brooks, formerly Mrs. Black well, who is visiting 
her mother, Mrs. Sam Holladay, is being numerously enter- 
tained by her friends in San Francisco. She was guest 
of honor at Mrs. Oxnard's recent luncheon, when tne 
other ladies were bidden to meet her, and the menu was 
most elaborate. On Tuesday evening she was chief guest 
at a dinner given by J. D. Phelan, which was served in the 
red room of the Bohemian Club, and at which sixteen 
other guests were entertained. Another dinner of Tues- 
day evening was complimentary to Miss Marie Oge, and 
had Mrs. Hooper of the Occidental Hotel as hostess, the 
other guests being Mrs. J. H. Jewett, Miss Marie Wells, 
Miss Hooper, Lieut. McCully of the Navy, Will Sanborn, 
and Al. Clement. 

Mrs. A. 6. Booth's luncheon on Tuesday was given for 
Mrs. James Allen of Menlo Park. It was a very pleasant 
gathering. Both Mrs. Allen's sisters, Mrs. Kirkpatrick 
and Mrs. McCoy, were among the guests, and the others, 
Mrs. J. P. Young, Mrs. J. F. Morse, Mrs. Cropper, Mrs. 
Gardner, and Mrs. J. D. Fry, old friends of the trio. On 
Tuesday afternoon and evening, Mr. and Mrs. Walter C. 
Campbell held a reception in celebration of the twentieth 
anniversary of iheir marriage, and during the evening 
hours especially the rooms of their pretty home on Turk- 
street were crowded with friends who came to wish tbem 
"many returns.'' Music was the feature of the eveniDg, 
which was passed delightfully. Mrs. Campbell was as- 
sisted in her duties by Mrs. J.' F. Merrill, Mrs. E. P. Buck- 
ingham, Mrs, Robert Watt, and Mrs. W. H. Mills; and 
among those present were Mr. and Mrs. Tim Hopkins, Dr. 
and Mrs. Henry Gibbons, Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Huntington, 
Mrs. J. !•'. Swift, Mr. and Mrs. Wendell Easton, Dr. and 
Mrs. Stebbins, Mr. and Mrs. P. B. Cornwall, Mr. and Mrs. 
Horace Davis, Mrs. L. L. Baker, Mrs. Blake-Alverson, 
Mr. and Mrs. Bixler, Henry Heyman, Colonel and Mrs. 
W C. Little, Mr. and Mrs. Bosworth, Dr. and Mrs. Pow- 
ers. Dr. and Mrs. Hemphill, Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Gowey, etc. 
Tuesday appears to have been popular, both at home 
and abroad, as that was the day selected for the social 
d&ml of Miss Marie McKenDa, which took place at a tea 
given by Mrs. MeKenna at their residence on California 
avenue, Washington City. The pretty dlbutanti wore a 
gown of white satin and mousselim de tow, and carried a 
bouquet of orchids and lilies of the valley. Among the 
"assisting" voung ladies were the Misses Bliss, Patten, 
Barber, MeKinley, Hayse, Gary Long, and Wilson, and 
the guests included the vice-President and Mrs. Hobart, 
most of the members of the cabinet, foreign ministers 
suls, Senators, members of Congress, and their families. 



This is Chinese day at the Sketch Club, when our local 
artists will exhibit some of their work on Chinese subjects, 
Joullin, Solly Walter, Jorgensen, MissFroelich, and others, 
being among the contributors. There will be appropriate 
costumes, Chinese music, and Chinese refreshments, and 
it will no doubt prove a novel affair altogether. 

St. Luke's Church on Wednesday eveniug was the scene 
of a pretty wedding, when Miss Mae Miller and Marshall 
Hale were the bride and groom, and the Rev. W. H. 
Moreland the officiating clergyman. White and pink were 
the dominating tints of the decorations in and around the 
chancel, combined with a profusion of Christmas greens 
and smilax. The bridal party, which entered to the 
strains of the Lohengrin chorus, consisted of Miss 
Jeannette Conroy as maid of honor, the Misses Lillian 
Schroeder, May Belle West of San Jose, Clara Hall and 
Leah Young as bridesmaids, and Leland Boruck as ring 
bearer. Prentis Hale officiated as his brother's best man, 
and Dr. E. R. Bryant, Dr. T. J. Fraser, Messrs. G. C. 
Barnhart and E. G. West performed the arduous duty of 
ushers satisfactorily. After the ceremony a reception 
was held at the home of the bride's parents on Baker 
street, which was limited to relatives and most intimate 
friends of the bride and groom, after which there was a 
handsome supper. The next wedding of importance will be 
that of Miss Harriet Kay and Frank Vail, which is named 
for Wednesday evening, February '2d., and will be sol- 
emnized at the home of the bride in Alameda. 

Our best Jewish circles are greatly interested in the 
engagement of Miss Flora Jacobi of New York, who has 
been spending the winter here with her relatives, the 
Brandensteins, to I. W. Hellman Jr., only son of the 
millionaire banker, which was formally announced on 
Tuesday last; and the wedding will no doubt be a brilliant 
affair, taking place in the early autumn. 

The Friday Fortnightlies had a very pleasant time at 
their last gathering; there are always plenty of men, and 
among the young ladies are many of the most attractive 
belles of the swin. 

The cotillion was under the direction of that veteran 
leader, Ed. Sheldon, who bad the assistance of Albert 
Russell and Miss Kate Salisbury, and among those in the 
first set were the Misses Lillie Follis, Mary Kip, Susie 
Blanding, Florence Josselyn, Caro Crocket, Bernie Drown 
and Maggie Salisbury. 

Mrs. L. L. Baker followed a good old fashion prevalent 
here some seasons ago and invited a Dumber to her house 
for supper after the dance, and now that the custom has 
again been taken up no doubt others of the lady patron- 
esses will follow Mrs. Baker's excellent example. 

Mrs. Wm. Frank gave a very pretty pink tea at her 
Post-street residence last week, the decorations consist- 
ing of bamboo, smilax, ferns and roses. Mesdames Arnold, 
Ste ; nhart, Forman, Rosenbaum, Geo. Frank, Sloss, Joe 
Rosenberg, and Albert Frank assisted the hostess. 
Good orchestra music was provided, and delicious refresh- 
ments were served to the large number of guests who 
crowded the rooms all afternoon. 

Miss Daisy Van Ness's tea last Sunday afternoon was 
complimentary to Miss Johnson of St. Louis. It was a 
small gathering, being limited to about thirty young peo- 
ple, but was an extremely pleasant one in every way. 

Card parties have not been so numerous this season as 
usual, but then there have been so many dances and other 
evening gatherings that there has not been much time for 
cards. It goes without saying though, that the progres- 
sive euchre party which Mrs. E. J. Coleman and Miss 
Carrie Gwin gave last week was a pleasant affair; the 
guests were all congenial, the prizes both pretty and 
valuable, and the supper one of those delicious feasts the 
Gwins know so well how to provide for their guests. 

The Cinderellas' dance next Wednesday eveniug is one of 
the pleasant affairs of the week which is most eagerly 
anticipated. Miss Bernie Drown will make a charming 
hostess at her "at home" next Saturday evening, and 
though the hours are early, from 8 to 11, that those hours 
will be pleasant ones is a foregone conclusion and so much 
more enjoyable than an afternoon tea. 

Mrs. S. P. Tuggle. nee Gould, is "at home" on Tuesdays 
in February at 904 Van Ness Avenue. 



January 2t, 1898. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



President and Mrs. Dole arrived from Honolulu last 
Sunday and were iruests in this city during the early 
part of the week. President D >\e was eutertained at the 
Baldwin Theatre, at a breakfast at the Bohemian Club and 
a luncheon at the Pacific-Union, by General Shafter at the 
Presidio when the troops were reviewed, and was taken 
for a trip around the bay. The party left for Washington 
on Wednesday evening. 

After attending the theatre last Tuesday evening, Presi- 
dent and Mrs. Dole and a number of their friends visited 
the Palace Grill and enjoyed a supper at that elegantly 
appointed grill room. The appointments, the service, the 
soft blending of lights, and the appetizing menu that wel- 
comes the guests are charms that make a visit to the 
Grill quite as enjoyable as the entertainment afforded by 
the Man From Mexico. 

The Hotel Rafael has had quite an influx of guests from 
San Francisco the past week. Many go over to enjoy for 
a brief SDace the quiet of that excellent hostelrie, then, 
feeling refreshed, can take up again the routine of society's 
treadmill upon their return to town. Among the guests 
for several weeks past have been Consul-General and Miss 
Warburton, who having given up their cottage in San 
Rafael, spent at the Hotel the time intervening before 
their departure from California. They purpose spending 
some time in Chili visiting relatives, before proceeding to 
England. Miss Warburton will be greatly missed the 
coming summer at San Rafael in the hunting field, paper 
chases, etc. 

Major and Mrs. Darling are still lingering in the Orient, 
but may be looked for home again in the very near future. 
Mrs. Darling will be greeted upon her arrival by her 
daughter, Mrs. E. C. la Montaigne, who, with her husband, 
arrived last week. They are dividing their time between 
San Francisco and the maternal ranch in Napa Valley. 
Mrs. Eleanor Martin has returned from her visit East, 
whither she went to nurse young Peter Martin, in his illness, 
who accompanied his mother home. The Downey Harveys 
are also back again, and so are the Kruttschnitts from 
their visit to New Orleans. 

Mr. W. F. Wentworth, the reader and impersonator of 
Boston, will give an evening at Plymouth Congregational 
Church, Post street, near Webster, Friday night, the 
28th inst. Mr. Wentworth is one of the best elocutionists 
of the country. His impersonations are exceedingly well 
done and his style inimitable. A most enjoyable evening 
is anticipated. Tickets can be had at Mauvais' music 
store or at Dodge's book store. 

Mrs. Webster Jones and Miss Gertrude Forman left for 
Coronado last Sunday, and will spend a month in the 
southern part of the State. 

The engagement of Miss Edna Louise Lowell and Harry 
S. Scott is announced. Miss Lowell is the daughter of 
Captain A. I. Lowell of Berkeley. 

" The Children's Festival and Christmas Tree," at 
Beethoven Hall, given by the Deutscher Verein on 
last Saturday evening, and at which there were seventy- 
five children and one hundred ladies and gentlemen pres- 
ent, was a very enjoyable affair. The refreshments were 
seived by Max Abraham, the well-known caterer of 428 
Geary street. 

MR. Charles J. Waterhouse, selling agent for Samuel 
Cabot, manufacturer of the well-known Creosote 
Shingle Stain and "Eel Grass deafening and sheathing 
quiltj" has moved from Well's-Fargo building, on New 
Montgomery street to the Sheldon building, at 421 Market 
street, rooms 30 and 31. Advertising matter, samples, 
and all information concerning their excellent materials 
furnished free, upon personal application or by mail. 

Gas Consumers Association. 31G Post street. Reduces gas bills 
from twenty to forty per cent. 

Have you seen the newest tnings in nebkwear and men's furnish- 
ing goods at Carmany's. 25 Kearny street. 

Drrssu<kino ParTjobs. Prices $5 up. Perfect satisfaction. Mrs. M. 
B. Campbell, 714 McAllister St. Telephone, Sleiner 1693. 



Why does your grocer like Schilling's Best 
baking powder ? 
Because. 



Mothers, besure and use "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup " tor your 
children while teething . 




It excels all others because it puts the 
stretch directly on the wrinkles; the middle 
or seam part of the leg Is free. Garment 
hangs by front ftnd rear parts It is quickly 
applied and is unequalel Furnishers sell 
them, or we mail them for the price. Address 

Chicago Form Co., Dept. U, 

135 La Salle St. Chicago, 111. 



DR. JAS. G. GILBERTSON. Dentist. 

819 Market Street, third floor, room E, San Francisco 
Hours : 9 10 5, Academy of Sciences Building. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 
Office of cue Hibernia Savings and Loan Society, corner Market, McAllis- 
ter, and Jones Sts., San Francisco, December 29, 1897. At a regular meeting 
of the Board of Directors of this Society, held this day, a dividend has been 
declared at the rate of ibree and three-fourths (39£) per cent, per annum on 
all deposits for the six months ending December 31, 1897, free from all 
taxes, and payable on and after January 1, 1898. 

ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savings and Loan Society. 

The Board of Directors declared a dividend for the term ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1897, at the rate of four (4) per cent per annum on Term De- 
posits, and three and one-third (3}tf) per cent per annum on Ordinary De- 
posits, free of taxes, payable on and after Monday. January 3, 1898. 

CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 

Office: 101 Montgomery street, cor. Sutter, San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
San Francisco Savings Union. 

For the half year ending Dec. 31, 1897, a dividend has been declared at the 
rate per annum of four and two-ienths (4 2) per cent, on lerm deposits and 
three and five-tenths (3 5) percent, on ordinary deposits, free of taxes, 
payable on and after Monday, January 3, 1898. 

Office— 532 California street, cor. Webb LOVELL WHITE, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

For the half year ending December 31, 1897, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of four (4) per cent, per annum on term deposits, and three and 
one-third (8M) per cent, per annum on ordinary deposits, free of taxes, 
payable on and after Monday, January 3, 189U. 

Office— 33 Post street, San Francisco, Cal. GEO. A. STORY, Cashier. 



>R. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL 
CREAM, OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER. 

Removes Tan, Pimples. Freckles, Moth 
Patches. Rash, and Skin Diseases, and 
every blemish on b'-auty, and defies de- 
tection It has stood the test of 4$ years 
and is so harmless we taste it to be sure 
it is properly made Accept no counter- 
feit of similar name. Dr. L. A Sayre 
said to a lady of the haut-ton (a pa- 
tient): As you ladies will use them. I 
recommend 'Gouraud's Cream' as the 
least harmful of all the Skin prepitra- 
tions." For sale by a 1 Druggists and 
Fancy-Goods Dealers in ttie United 
States, Canadas, and Europe. 

FERD. T. HOPKINS, Prop'r. 

37 Great Jones St.. N.Y. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 22, 1898. 



JAPANESE FINANCES. 

THE following article is taken from the Japan Weekly 
Gazette, one of the most influential papers published 
in that country. It is especially interesting at this time: 

"Count Matsukata, the most experienced of Japanese 
financiers, still remains at the post of duty, though busi- 
ness disasters threaten and the financial position of the 
Government is every day becoming more perilous. Beset 
on every hand by contradictory advice from despairing 
merchants in desperate straits, he remains faithful to his 
principles, yielding neither to the clamours of the panic 
stricken, nor adopting the dangerous expedients of those 
who are willing to imperil the future if they can only safe- 
guard to-day. He faces the situation and is courageous 
enough to suggest measures to meet it which cannot be 
popular. That situation is certainly serious. The Budget 
of the 2'.nh fiscal year anticipated a deficit of B,000,000 
yen and suggested the raising of a loan; the Budget of 
the 30th fiscal year anticipated a deficit of 60,000,0 
which was also to be met by a loan, and the next Budget 
will also need a loan of 49,000,000 yen to meet the differ- 
ence between estimated revenue and estimated expendi- 
ture. Here then are loans amounting to 119,000,000 yen 
of which not a cent has been raised, and to these deficits 
be added the extra cost of governing Formosa. -I. - 
nun. (Mill yen as compared with the estimated 12,000,000 
yen; 1, mill. 0(111 less in the yield of the Registration Tax; 
2,300,000 yen less owing to the abolition of the forced 
official contribution to the warship fund; 2, 11011,11110 yen less 
in the yield of the Business Tax; 3,000,000 yen less in the 
Tobacco Monopoly, and 6,000,000 yen expended as against 
an estimated 1,000,1100 yen for the encouragement of 
navigation. Altogether then we have a deficit amounting 
to upwards of 1011,000.1100 yon. Now if one thing is cer- 
tain at the moment in Japan it is that the Japanese peo- 
ple cannot raise any loans internally. Two of the chief 
capitalists of Osaka have already collapsed and one bank 
has failed, while in Tokyo and Yokohama the merchants 
are in such straitened circumstances that they absolutely 
cannot take delivery of goods ordered. And all the time 
the balance of trade is against Japan, and while gold is be- 
ing drained out of the country, the Osaka cotton mills are 
coming to a standstill. Nor is anything to be expected 
from economies. Government officials are so wretchedly 
underpaid that they ran scarcely subsist on their paltry 
salaries. But what does CountMatsnkata propose? He 
is advised to reduce the excessive armaments. That, 
seems the wisest policy, for unless Japan means to fight 
she is arming far too heavily for the mere purposes of de- 
fence. It was a sagacious step to add to the Navy, but 
the army that captured Port Arthur and Wei-bei-wei was 
quite adequate to guarding Japan's shores against any 
possible invasion for the next quarter of a century. I lounl 
Matsukata, however, points out that to slop now would 
very little in the matter of economy and would in- 
troduce endless confusion. Orders have been placed which 
cannot be cancelled; building commenced which cannot be 
abandoned, and a general scheme half completed which it 
would be perilous to curtail. Neither is he in favor of 
raising a foreign loan though urged thereto by the 
Yokohama and Osaka Chambers of Commerce." The 
effect, in his opinion, would be to aggravate the malady. 
He has one specific, the increase of taxation. Prices of 
rice and agricultural products generally have risen so 
rapidly that he considers the land will bear a much greater 
burden than is at present imposed. The general financial 
situation he would let alone, confident that it will right it- 
self. We take it that this is the proposition he will lav 
before the coming Diet and that by the decision of the 
Diet he will stand or fall. It is a very heroic attitude to 
make the country carry its own burdens, but we question 
if the country will cousent to what many will regard as 
an obnoxious imposition. That, however, remains to be 
seen. We cannot but applaud the desire to avoid the en- 
tanglements which must ensue if Japan once becomes de- 
pendent upon European bondholders, but we cannot dis- 
cover how Japan is to escape that to which Germany, 
France, Russia and America have all had to submit, and 
the extra taxation proposed seems wholly inadequate to 
meet the exigencies of the situation. After all people 
cannot sacrifice that which they do not possess, and it is 



impossible to any ordinary observer to discover where in 
Japan the money exists to defray at present the out- 
standing liabilities of the nation." 



Ayres' Business College, 325 Montgomery. Individual instruction, 
shorthand, typewriting, bookkeeping, telegraphy; life scholarship, 150; 
low rates per week and month ; day; evening. Send for catalogue. 

Cooper & Co., 746 



Fine stationery, steel and copper-plate engraving. 
Market street. Sao Francisco. 



CITY INDEX AND PURCHASER'S GUIDE 

RESTAURANTS. 
Bergez's Restaurant, Academy Building, 333-334 Pine street, below Mont- 
gomery. Rooms for ladies and families; private entrance. John Bergez 
Proprietor. 
Maison Tortoni, French Rotlsserle, 111 O'Farrell street. Private dining 

rooms and banquet ball. S. Constantini, Proprietor. 
Poodle Dog Restaurant, S. E. cor. Grant ave. and Busb st. Private 

dining and banquet rooms. Tel 429 A. B Blanco & B. Brun. 

Bay State Oyster House and Grill Room, 15 Stockton street and 109 
O'Farrell street. N. M- Aiiler Proprietor. Telephone Main 505". 

MEDICAL 
Dr. Hall, 14 McAllister St. . near Jones Diseases of women and children. 

POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS. 

Hawaiian Stamps a specialty. MAKINS & CO 506 Market street. 
Selections on approval :'any place in world. W. F. GREANY.827Brannan 
The W. H. Hollls 8tamp Co., (Incorporated), 105 O'Farrell St., S. F. 

BOILERMAKERS. 
P. F. Dundon's San Francisco Iron Works, 314, 316, and 318 Main Street. 
Iron Work of every description designed and constructed . 

San Francisco and North Pacific R'y Co. 



SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. TiBDRON Ferry- Foot of Market Street. 
WEEK DAYS— 7:30, 9:00, 11:00 a m; 12:35,3:80 5:10.6:30pm. Thursdays- 
Extra trip at 11:30 P m. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1 :50 and 11 :30 P m. 
SUNDAYS— 8:00, 9:30. 11:00 a u; 1:30 3:30, 5:00. 6:20 ph. 

SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO. 
WEEK DAYS— 6:10, 7:50,9:20, 11:10 am; 12:45, 3:40, 5:10 pm. Saturdays- 
Extra trips at 1 :55 and 6:35 p m. 
SUNDAYS— 8:10. 9:40. 11:10 A m; 1:40.3:40.5:00,6:25 P M. 

Between San Francisco and Schuetzen Park, same schedule as above. 



Leave 


S. F. 


In Effeot Oct. 34, 1887 


ARRIVE tN S. F. 


Week Days. 


Sundays. 


Destination. 


Sundays 

10:40 AH 
9:10 PH 
7:35 PH 


Week Days 


7:30a m 

3:30 PM 
5:10pm 


8:00 ah 
9:30 ah 

5:00 pm 


Novato, 

Petaluma. 

Santa Rosa. 


8:40 AM 
10:25 A H 
6:22 PM 


"'7:80 AH 
3:30 PH 


8:00 AH 


Fulton, Windsor, 

Healdsburg, 

Geyserville. Cloverdale 


7:35ph 


10:26 A M 
6:22 P H 


7:30 AH 


8:00 am 


Hopland, Uklah 


7:35 PH 


6:22 PH 


7:30a m 
3:30ph 


8:00a u 


Guerneville. 


7:85PH 


10:26 A M 
6:22 p M 


7:30 AH 
5:I0PH 


8:0Ua h 
5:0UPH 


Sonoma, ■ 
Glen Ellen. 


10:40 am 
6:10pm 


8:40 A M 
6:22 p M 


7-30A H 

3:30ph 


8:00a h 
5:00 PH 


Sebastopol. 


10:40am I 

7:35 PM | 


10:25 A M 
6:22 P M 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West Springs: at Geyserville 
for Skaggs' Springs: at Cloverdale for the Geysers; at Hopland for High- 
land Springs, Kelseyville, Soda Bay, Lakeport, and Bartlett Springs; at 
Ukiah. for Vichy Springs, Saratoga Springs. Blue Lakes, Laurel Del 
Lake. Upper Lake. Porno. Potter Valley. John Day's, Riverside. Ller- 
ley's. Bucknell's Sashedoln Heights, Hullvllle. Boonevllle, Orr's Hot 
Springs. Mendocino City. Ft. Bragg. Westport, Usal. 

Saturday-to-Monday Round Trip Tickets atreduoed rates. On Sundays, 
Round Trip Tickets to all points beyond SaD Rafael at half rates. 

TICKET OFFICE— 650 Market St., Chronicle Building. 
A. W. FOSTE R. Pres. & Gen. Manager. R. X. RYAN, Gen. Pass . Agent. 

Occidental and Oriental Steamship Co. 

FOR JAPAN AN0 CHINA. 

Steamers leave wharf. FIRST and BRANNAN STREETS, sun., for 

YOKOHAMA AND HONGKONG. 

calling at tvube (Hlocol, Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting at 

Hongkong with steamers for India, etc No cargo received on board on 

day of sailing. 

COPTIC .Thursday. February 8. 1888 

GAELIC (via Honolulu) Wednesday, February 23, 1808 

Doric (via Honolulu! Saturday. March is, 18t8 

Belgic Saturday, April 2, 1898 

Round Trip Tickets at reddced Rates. 

For freight or passage apply at Company's Office. No. 421 Market street, 
oorner First. D. D. STUBBS. Secretary- 

only, Tuesday 



EANIC 




imsli 

<§ul|33!Ut- 



S S "Australia", for Honolulu 

January 25, 1898, at 3P M. 

S. S. "Alameda," Thursday. February 3. I8S8. 

Line to Coolgardle, Australia, and Capetown 

South Africa. 

J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS CO., 
Agents, 114 Montgomery St. Freight office, '23 
Market St., San Francisco. 



January 22, iSy8. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



23 



PERSONALIS. 



AMBASSADOR Draper has entirely refurnished the 
Piombino palace in Rome, which Mr. MacVeagh oc- 
cupied as ambassador to Italy, and is said to have spent 
1100,000 on the draperies alone. 

Miss Hsu of Soochow recently married a red flower 

vase as a substitute for her betrothed, who died before 
the wedding day. He was a son of Lu Jen Hsiang, vice- 
chancellor of the Imperial academy at Peking. The young 
woman having determined to marry no one else, adopted 
this means to enter her betrothed*s family and so be 
treated as a widow. The people of Soochow are talking 
of building a stone arch to commemorate Miss Hsu's 
virtues. 

Governor Desha of Kentucky, more than half a cen- 
tury ago, had a wild son, who was convicted of homicide in 
that state. The governor promptly pardoned his son, and 
he disappeared. That son is now the most eloquent 
preacher in the Hawaiian islands. He knows the native 
language perfectly, and bis greatest sermons are preached 
in it. 

Mme. Maretzek, the widow of Max Maretzek, the 

famous pianist, who died a few months ago, is threatened 
with becoming totally blind. Many 3'ears ago she was a 
celebrated harpist. She is living at the Maretzek home- 
stead in Pleasant Plains, Staten island, and is nearly 70 
years of age. 

Some improvement has recently taken place in the 

health of Munkacsy, the celebrated Hungarian painter. 
Mme. Munkacsy, in a letter received a few days back, by 
a friend in London, states that during a recent visit to the 
asylum in which her husband is confined, she found him 
much calmer. 

Bishop Creighton of London has received a present 

of a burnished ivory miter, inscribed in letters of gold 
with the words "Holiness to the Lord" in Hebrew, Greek, 
Latin and English. A large section of his flock objects to 
his using a miter at all. 

A correspondent of the London Chronicle writes of 

Bismarck: "With a capriciousness of a much-courted 
beauty, the prince soon forgets his countless gifts, and the 
carefully devised attentions are frequently left unacknow- 
ledged." 

Dean Farrar, in his "Reminiscences," says that 

Dean Stanley's handwriting was so bad that when he once 
answered an invitation to dinner the hostess wrote back 
and asked whether his note was an acceptance or a 
refusal. 

Lord Rosebery ha" been invited by the queen to 

bring his daughter, Lady Sibyl Primrose, to "Windsor 
castle to dine and spend one night. This is a very rare 
honor for a young lady not yet presented. 

President Inglesias of Costa Rica is described by an 

American as "the Diaz of Central America — a soldier as 
well as a statesman, and imbued with the progressive 
spirit of the most enlightened nations." 

Although Maurice Jokat, the Hungarian novelist, is 

72 years old, he has undertaken another work, which can- 
not be completed within four years. In 50 : years he has 
written 350 volumes. 

Paderewski has a great hobby for decorating his 

home with relics of great composers andmusieians, so that 
it now has the appearance of a museum. 



Southern Pacific Co. --Pacific System. 

Trains Leave and are Due to Arrive at SAN FRANCISCO: 
(Main Lino. Foot of Market Street.) 



A Panorama 440 Miles Long. 
From the Observation (Jar 00 the New York Central alivingpan- 
oriiui 440 miles ions; may be seen. This includes the Genesse, 
Black River and Mohawk Valleys and 143 miles of the Hudson 
River, including the foothills of the Adirondack Mountains; the 
Capitol at Albany; th» Catskill Mountains; the Palisades of tbe 
Hudson and the New York Central's magnificent approach to the 
metropolis — this being the only trunk line whose trains enter the 
city of New Xork 

THB Press Clipping Bureau. 510 Montgomery street, S. P. reads all 
papers on the Paoitlc Coast, and supplies ollppirgs on al] topics, businest 
and personal. 



Leave. I 



Frcmi January 1, 1898. 



I Arrive 



•6:U0a Nlles, San Jose, and way stations *8:46A 

7:00 a Benicla. Suisun, and Sacramento 10:45 A 

7 :00 A Marysville. Orovllle, and Redding, via Woodland 5 :4S p 

7:00 A Vacavllle and Rumsey 8:45 p 

7:3UA Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, Napa, Cahstoga, Santa Rosa 6:15 p 

8:00 a Atlantic Express, Ogden and East 8:45p 

8:30a Nlles, San Jose, Stockton, lone, Saoramento, Marysville, 

Cbico, Tehama, and Red Bluff 4 : 15 p 

•8:30a Peters, Milton, and Oakdale *7:15P 

9:00a New Orleans Express, Merced, Raymond, Fresno, Bakers- 
field, Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, Doming, El Paso, New 

Orleans, and Ease 6:45p 

9:00 A Vallejo, Martinez, Meroed, and Fresno 12:15 p 

*1 :00 p Sacramento River steamers *9 :00 p 

l:0OP Niles, San Jose, and Way Stations J9:15 A 

1:30 p Martinez and Way Stations 7:45 p 

2:00 p Livermore, Mendota, Hanford, and Visalia 4:15 p 

Livermore, San Jose, Niles and iJVay Stations J10:15A 

4:00 p Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, Napa, Callstoga, El Verano 

and Santa Rosa 9:15A 

4 :00 P Benicla, Vacavllle, Woodland, Knight's Landing, Marys- 

ville, Orovllle, and Sacramento 10:45 A 

4:30p Niles, San Jose, Tracy, and Stockton 7:15 p 

4:30 p Lathrop, Modesto, Merced, Berenda, Fresno, Mojave (for 

Randsburg), Santa Barbara and Los Angeles 7:45 A 

4:30 p Santa Fe Route, AtlantioExpress. for Mojave and East 6:45 p 

115:30 p " Sunset Limited." Los Angeles, El Paso, Fort Worth, Lit- 
tle Rock, St. Louis, Chicago, and East H10:15A 

H5:30p "Sunset Limited Annex," El Paso, New Orleans, and East glO'15 A 

o:uu P European mall, Ogden and East.. 9:45 A 

6 :00p Hay wards, Niles and San Jose ' 7:45A 

J8:00p Vallejo. ... 17:45? 

8 :00p Oregon Express, Sacramento, Marysville, Redding, Port- 
land, Puget Sound and East 8:15A 



San Leandro and Hatwards Local. (Foot of Market St.) 


t*6-00 Al 


Melrose, 


7:15 A 


8:00A 


Seminary Park, 


(*8:45 A 


9:00 A 


Fitcbburq, 


10:45 A 


10:00 A 


ELMHURST, 


11:45 A 


ill. 00 A 


San Leandro. 


12:45 P 


(12:00 m 


South San Leandro , 


(1:45 P 




ESTtTDILLO, 


J2:45 P 


t3:00 p 


Lorenzo, 


(4:45 P 


4:00 p 


Cherry, 


(5:45 p 


5:00 p 


and 


6:15 p 


5:30 p 


HAYWARDS. 


7:45 p 


7:00 p 




8:45 P 


8:00 p 


i Runs through to Niles. 


9:45 P 


9:00 p 


t From Niles 


10:50 P 


ttll:15 p 


ltU2:00 p 



6:55 A 
9:00 a 


10:40A 
11:80 A 
*2:30p 


•3:15 p 
«4:15P 
•5:00 P 
5:30 p 
6:30P 
tll:46p 



Coast Division (Narrow Gauge). (Foot of Market St.) 

8 :15 A Newark, Centerville. San Jose, Felton, Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruz and way stations 5 :50 p 

*2 :15 P Newark, Centerville, San Jose, New Almaden, Felton, Boul- 
der Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal way stations *10:5ua 

4 :15p Newark, San Jose and Los Gatos 9:20> 

tll:45P Hunters' Excursion, San Jose and Way Stations J7:20p 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 

From San Francisco— Foot of Market street (Slip 8). — *7:15, 9:00, and 
11 r00 A. M.,J1:00. *2:00. 13:00. *4:00, 1.5:00 and *6:00p. m. 

From Oakland— Foot of Broadway.— *6:00, 8:00, 10:00 A. m.; 112:00, *1:00, 
12 :00,*3:00, 1.4:00 *5 :00 p.m. 

Coast division (Broad Q-auge). (Third and Townsend streetB). 

San Jose and way stations (New Almaden Wednesdays only) 6:55 a 

San Jose, Tres Pinos, Santa Cruz. Paoiflo Grove, Paso Robles 

San Luis Obispo, Guadalupe, Surf and principalway stations 4:15 * 

San Jose and way stations *8 :00 a 

San Jose and way stations 8 :35 a 

San Mateo. Redwood, Menlo Park, Santa Clara, San Jose, 
Gilroy, Hollister, Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, Pacific 

Grove *10:40a 

San Jose and Principal Way Stations *9 :00 a 

San Jose and Principal Way Stations 9 :45 a 

San Jose and Principal Way Stations 1 :30 p 

San Jose and principal way stations 5 :30 p 

San Jose and way stations 7 :20 p 

San Jose and way stations 7:20p 

a for Morning, p for Aiternoon. *Sundays excepted. tSaturdays only. 

tSundays only. tt Monday, Thursday, and Saturday nights only. 

^Mondays and Thursdays. ^Wednesdays and Saturdays, 

The Pacific Transfer Company will call for and oheck baggage from 
hotels and residences. Enquire of Tioket Agents for Time Cards and 
other information. 

Pacific Coast Steamship Co. 

Steamers leave Broadway Wharf, San Francisco for ports In Alaska, 
9 A. m., January 1. 6, 11, 16, 21, 26, 31, and every 5th day thereafter. 

For British Columbia and Puget Sound ports, 9 
6, 11, 16,21,26, 31, and every 5th day thereafter. 

For Eureka (Humboldt Bay), Steamer " Pomona," 
1,5, 10, 14, 18, 22, 26, 31. February 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 25, 29. 

For Newport, (Los Angeles) and all way ports, 9 a, 
9, 13, 19,21,25, 29 and every fourth day thereafter. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Port Harford Santa Barbara. Port Los 
Angeles, Redondo, (Los Angeles) 11 A. m., January 3,7,11,15, 17.23,27, 
31, and every fourth day thereafter. 

For ports in Mexico. 10 A. M., January 6, and 2d of each month thereafter. 
The company reserves the right to change, without previous notice, 
steamers, sailing dates, and hours of sailing. 
TICKET OFFICE— Palace Hotel, No. 4 New Montgomery street. 
GOODALL. PERKINS & CO., Gen. Agts., 10 Market St.. San Francisco 



m., January 1, 
P. M., January 
; January 1, 5, 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 22, 1898. 




ft 



DECORATION- 

LOUNGE of some description, covered with chintz, 

_ is very necessary in a woman's room, allowing, as it 
does, for casual "lying downs" through the day. A very 
serviceable lounge, built of common pine boards, can be 
made in the shape of a box. It should be one foot high by 
two and a half wide, and six feet long. On the top is 
nailed a wire mattress set on a frame, with hinges forming 
the cover. The whole is on casters, the caster to be 
moved, and a wool mattress and roll at the head complete 
the outlay. Inside, the long box makes a convenient place 
for dresses, laid at full length. A work-table near a win- 
dow is also convenient; and by the bed a small table, with 
a brass or china candlestick and perhaps a book or two, is 
a pleasant revival of a custom of the past. A mirror, 
hanging over a chest of drawers, should never be so high 
that sitting one may not use it without the craning of one's 
neck, nor so low that those of ordinary height cannot see 
without clucking down. 

If possible, the bedstead should not face a window. The 
light streaming into the room on a summer morning is too 
precious to shut out entirely, but full upon one's face it is 
not conducive to a pleasant awakening. The old-fashioned 
canopy overhead, met this difficulty in a sensible way by 
allowing one to subdue the sunshine with the crisp 
starched curtains, which also assisted in turning aside the 
dratts, the four-poster of our forbears being even more 
successful, as the light and air could be regulated to a 
nicety. 

Window-seats, with cupboards or drawers beneath, are 
cheap and useful things, and add much comfort in a room. 
They should not be so broad as to make difficult the access 
to the window, for this is detrimental to the soul of man, 
and ruins the disposition of the best of women. 

A man's room is, generally speaking, but a dressing and 
sleeping apartment, in which the owner never thinks of 
sitting or living. For such uses the plainness of ascetic- 
ism seems most desirable. The old emperor o German}'. 
William I, slept always in a bare room on an .ron bed- 
stead, and left the gorgeous decorated bed rooms of the 
Second Empire to his future victim, Napoleon III. Yet 
such a room, though exhibiting Spartan simplicity, should 
do so in a harmonious and agreeable 
manner, and not indicate slovenliness 
or lack of care. Imagine, for exam- 
ple, a man's room in which the walls 
were painted a soft gray, the iron 
bedstead and the washstand and 
chest of drawers ail a bright red, 
with brass trimmings. On the dark 
red floor are red and black Navajo 
blankets for rugs. No pictures are 
upon the wall at all, or, if any, only a 
few, all large and expressing individ- 
uality — a large bromide photograph 
of Sir Galahad, for instance, pasted 
flat against the wall and framed with 
a narrow bead of black. 

Smoke pictures are quite popular. 
They are made by smoking a piece of 
glazed cardboard over a candle, wip- 
ing the half tones out of the sooty 
surface with a brush, which leaves a 
gray ground, and taking out the high 
lights with a pointed bit of wood. 

In using spool cotton or silk, th? 
knotting of the thread may be avoided 
by threading the needle before break- 
ing off the strand; knot it at the 
end broken, and use it always in this 
direction. It will not gather up after 
a few stitches in those exasperating 
twisted knots if so used. 

Drapery, as a means of modifying 
the stiff and cold appearance ot the 
entrance hall, is not made as much 
use of as it might be. Whenever it 



,0000000000000000000000^00000000000000) 

^ 1 ANDY CATHARTIC 



CURE CONSTIPATION 



s 



Constipation Afflicts 

part of the people all the time, 
all the people part of the time. 
Are you a chronic or occasional sufferer from constipation ? 1 
Do you want a sure, pure cure ? 

CASCARETS (eat 'em like candy) will stimulate J 
your liver, regulate your bowels, leave your 1 
blood clean and rich, sweeten your breath and \ 
make your stomach do its work. 

CASCARETS KILL DISEASE GERMS, cure 
sick headache, taste good and do good, please ' 
the children, destroy and drive off worms and < 
other parasites. 

■>»■•»• •-•-•-♦-•-♦-• »■.>■■.••••..».♦.....■ 

A ioc box will prove their merit, and put you on 1 
the right road to perfect and permanent health. Try ] 
a ioc box to-day 1 If not pleased, get your money ■ 
back. Larger boxes, 25c or 50c. 



BOOKLET AND 
SAMPLE 

FREE 
FOR THE 
ASKING 




The 
only Cenuine, 
Beware of 
imitations ! 



ADDRESS 

Sterling Remedy Co. 

CHICAGO OR 
NEW YORK. 255 



Soooooooooooooc-oooooooooooooooooooooooo 

can be employed, either as a portiere over a door or 
across an archway, as well as for hangings for the stair- 
case windows, it will, if made of suitable material, and 
harmonizing with the walls and wood-work, warm and 
lighten the hall and give it a more hospitable aspect. 



iiiiMMiMiuirtiiiuM 



wamam 



We will give one hundred latest improved Singer Sevdng- 
Machines in even exchange for an equal number of the 
oldest sewing-machines of any make, now in family use. 
Awards to be decided from applications sent to us before 
March I, 1898. The new machines will be 
delivered within thirty days thereafter. 



Who has 

the.. 

Oldest 

Sewing= 

Machine? 



A new ■■ Singer" 
given in 
exchange for it. 



AH you have to do is to send this informa- 
tion on a postal card : (1) your name ; (2) 
location of your residence ; (3) post-office 
ss ; (4) name of your machine ; (5) its 
factory number ; (6) length of time in use ; 
(7) paper in which y u saw this. Send 
details m this exact order on a postal card 
a letter — and put nothing else on 
the postal card hut the information desired. 



This is no guessing contest requiring a 
payment, a subscription, or a personal 
service of any sort. If you own an old 
sewing-machine, you have only to send 
the requisite information in order to com- 
pete for a prize worth having. It costs 
absolutely nothing but a postal card, 

which may bring to your door the best sewing-machine 

in the world in exchange for your old t ne. 



THE SINGER MANUFACTURING CO. 

P.O. Box 1814, New York City. 



WITH S. F. NEWS LETTER. 



JANUARY 29. 1898 



; - p ^ s 



T H£ ^%*r 




vema Covxrfty' 1 VAoocV 






P^oweeri Wcl^otv. 




Snap Shots of the California Golden dubilee Procession. 



Price per Copy, 10 Cents. 



Annual Subscription, $4.00 




9hH FRANCl Seo 




(&\xliUmW$fobzxtx%zx* 




Vol. IV I. 



SAN FRANCISCO, JANUARY 29, 1898 



Number 5. 



Printed and Punished every Saturday by the proprietor, FRED MARRIUT'J 
5tf Kearny street, San Francisro. Entered at San Francisco Post- 
office as Second-class Matter. 

The office of the NEWS LETTER in New York City is at Temple Court; 
and at Chicago, 903 Boyce Building, (Frank E Morrison, Eastern 
Representative), where information may be obtained regarding subscrip- 
tion and advertising rates. 

CO. Brown, self-admitted perjurer, stands in pre- 
, cisely the light to-day that he did before his return 
and before his acknowledged guilt. His confession was 
superfluous. Everybody knew him for the rascal he was. 
His confession has not a true note nor a sincere word in 
it, his whole bearing is that of a conscienceless rogue, and 
the ministers who listened in amazement to bis canting 
declarations of penitence did their duty in dropping him 
from their roll of fellowship. Excepting as an illustration 
of the theory of utter depravity, his uses are at an end. 

THE Grand Jury of Douglas County, Nevada, adjourned 
last Tuesday without having done anything toward 
the discovery or indictment of the men who were guilty of 
the lynching that took place in that section recently. It 
is impossible to think that honest effort was made to hunt 
down and bring to account those who perpetrated the 
crime. However, as Nevada welcomed the world's great- 
est prize-fight with loud acclaim, and Nevada's Governor 
swelled with pride at having shaken hands with the 
bruisers, the failure to indict a noble band of citizens for 
having hanged and shot a prisoner, is hardly worthy of 
remark, ft was the expected that happened in Nevada. 

THE laws of California prohibit the use of any foreign 
flags in processions. The Stars and Stripes alone 
should appear in these public demonstrations. This is the 
law; but we note that it was not respected in last Mon- 
day's Jubilee parade. The Irish flag waved successful de- 
fiance of the California statutes from start to finish, and 
there was no protest entered. Whether Erin's emblem is 
a privileged flag in San Francisco, or its kith and kin have 
a pull, we know not. But it should not have been per- 
mitted in the parade. The law is a wholesome, patriotic 
State provision, and it ought to apply to the flags of all 
nations and the peoples of all the earth. We love the 
Irish; but the Stars and Stripes are good enough for every 
man who walks on American soil, be he Celt or savage, 
bond or free. 

ISAAC Irwin, who was sent to San Quentin for twelve 
years this week for having robbed and nearly killed his 
benefactor, expressed a sense of gratification that he was 
in such good luck. "I will now have a comfortable home," 
said this would-be murderer, "which is more than I have 
been able to say for some years." Precisely. This man 
hit the nail on the head, and in a sentence accounted for a 
large percentage of the crimes committed in this country. 
A good home is not to be despised these hard times, and 
the assurance of a full stomach and comfortable quarters 
are to some men a quid pro quo for the slight inconveniences 
of restraint. The prisoners in our jails are too well fed. 
They are made too comfortable by half. If the peniten- 
tiaries in California meant for the criminal what they do in 
England, we should have smaller police and criminal court 
bills to pay. To men who are ripe for evil deeds, a de- 
terrent sharper than mere imprisonment is necessary. If 
hard labor, coarse fare, and harsh, will-breaking discipline 
were to take the place of groauing tables, short hours at 
gentle exercise, and mild, conciliatory treatment, we should 
have fewer-criminals — fewer men like Irwin, who thanked 
God when sentence was pronounced, that it was a pass- 
port to "a comfortable home." 



■pJ-VERY arrangement for the opening of the Mining 
L/ Fair, which takes place this evening, is about com- 
pleted, the Mechanics' Pavilion is in order, and the history j 
of mining in California will be practically illustrated. This 
object lesson should be of much value just at this time, and 
will doubtless result in a renewed interest in one of the 
great industries of the State. 

THE citizen who passes muster and shall be deemed 
worthy of a seat in the panel that will try Figel, the 
alleged murderer of Isaac Hoffman, will have established 
a flattering claim to utter ignorance. One qualification 
necessary to become a juror is a failure to have read any- 
thing concerning the tragedy of which the press of the 
city was filled for months following the murder. This 
alone shuts out any one of sufficient intelligence to pass on 
the guilt or innocence of anything or anybody. The rule 
should be amended so as to exclude any one from the panel 
who can read the English language. The utter absurdity 
of the qualification must be apparent to the simplest mind. 
Newspaper reading is universal, and in these days that 
man who does not read the daily press is an ignoramus. 
Yet this is one of the chief essentials to jury duty in capi- 
tal criminal cases. That justice ever penetrates this 
shield of crime is even more a matter of amazement than 
congratulation. 

WITHOUT going into the merits of the case as to ', 
whether General Sheehan, ex-Secretary of the Yose- 
mite Valley Commission, is guilty or innocent of misappro- 
priating funds of which he was custodian during his term 
of office, it is well to direct attention to the fact that the 
affairs of the Commission are conducted in an unbusiness- 
like and loose manner. There should be no question of 
doubt, as to whether General Sheehan is guilty. The books 
should be kept as are the accounts of a private firm, so 
that at any time an examination could be made and the 
facts reached. The charges made by Mr. Foote are of a 
positive character, and demand a very clear answer. The 
history of General Sheehan's connection with the receiver- 
ship of the defunct People's Home Savings Bank and the 
Hebbard libel suit against this paper are yet fresh in the 
public mind, and do not add strength to the general denial 
of crookedness put in by the ex-Secretary of the Yosemite 
Valley Commission. 

WELLS FARGO & CO.'S very interesting and valua- 
ble annual report of the production of the precious 
metals west of the Missouri river (including British Co- 
lumbia), for the year 1897, is presented in to-day's News 
Letter. These annual statements have become the high- 
est authority upon the yield of precious metals. Collected 
with the utmost care, and annually printed, they have all 
the weight of Government reports. One significant fact 
appears, as suggested by President Valentine: The output 
of the vear was the greatest in the history of the 
country^ that of gold $69,830,597, being above any 
previous record officially reported. The world's total 
of gold approximated $240,000,000, which exceeds by 
$24,000,000 the estimates made by Mr. Valentine six 
months ago. It is altogether possible that 1898 will 
clean up a material increase over last year's figures. 
There can be no doubt that Alaska will pour millions into 
the stream of the yellow metal, California will show a 
greater iucrease over 1897, which exceeded 1896 by a 
million dollars, and it is admitted that Colorado will main- 
tain its enormous gain over 1896 that the report of 1S97 
shows. In 1896 that State yielded 112,712,482; in 1897, 
$18,326,554 — a clear gain of more than five and one-half 
millions of dollars. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 29, 1898. 



CURRENCY REFORM DOES NOT GO. 

SECRETARY GAGE, whom President MoKinley hap- 
pily selected as the ablest known financier in the 
country to manage a shockingly disgruntled Treasury, is 
having a hard road to travel. The old men of the sea, of 
whom there is not merely one, but a dozen of them in the 
Senate, are on his back, worrying him almost to death. 
Senator Berry, from his seat in the Senate, denounces the 
President for "not having the nerve to kick him (Secre- 
tary Gage) out of the Cabinet." This because the Secre- 
tary stands by the St. Louis platform, the pledges of the 
party in power, and the results of the issue submitted to 
the nation at the last election. The debate arose on cer- 
tain pro-silver resolutions introduced by Senatoi Teller, 
who represents Colorado, and who bolted the St. Lciuis 
Convention as soon as it adopted a sound money platform. 
The purpose of his resolutions he stated plainly in debate. 
He said: "I want to say here and now that I believe in 
paying the debts of the Government in silver, even if that 
is the cheaper metal. The Government has the right to 
the difference. * * » 1 have seen the Treasury robbed. 
The fact is that department has been a law unto itself for 
twenty-five years past." That is to say, he would repay 
borrowed money worth one hundred cents on the dollar 
with money now only worth forty-five cents on the dollar, 
and he believes it honest for the Government to pocket 
"the difference." To thinking minds, to state the propo- 
sition, even in the words of its authors, is to answer it. 
But, unfortunately, men who agree with Senator Teller 
hold the balance of power in the Senate, and have a con- 
siderable following in the South and in all the new States. 
It is idle to attempt to blink these facts. They will not 
down. When the Senate called the roll on what was 
deemed a test motion, it was found that the Tellerites 
were in a majority of ten. "That means," exclaimed Sen- 
ator Vest, "free and unlimited coinage of silver." If it 
does, what is the use of national elections and appeals to 
the country? If the last election settled auything, it was 
that every dollar should be the equal in value of every 
other dollar. 

It is possible that this great country may prosper for a 
time in spite of its lawmakers. With a cereal production 
that beats the record, and prices almost famine high, 
money is to-day plentiful in hundreds of thousands of 
pockets that were previously empty. But that condition 
of things is not likely to last long. Normal seasons will 
come to other countries as well as to this, and we may even j 
experience an abnormal one. such as they have just passed 
through; which, however, may the Great Roler of all 
things avert. In any case, we shall have to face things 
as they are. We shall have to meet the world as we find 
it. It exacts measure for measure, yard for yard, and 
one hundred cents as the honest standard value of a dollar. 
Shirk that obligation and we at once go into bankruptcy, 
and, what is worse, we shall be taking advantage of the 
law while still able to pay our honest debts in full. As that 
would affect an individual, so will it affect a nation. The 
dishonest bankrupt not only loses his own self-respect, but 
suffers social ostracism, loss of commercial credit, and is 
degraded among men. That our proud people will ever 
permit anything like repudiation or national insolvency to 
overtake their Treasury is not for one moment to be be- 
lieved. The mischief is that these things are being advo- 
cated in their name and with a show of strength that is 
simply appalling. It is startling to every man who owns 
anything. Be he savings bank depositor, life insurer, 
member of an endowment society, pensioner, investor for a 
small income, or anything else that represents value, and 
he is brought face to face, astounding to say, with the 
possibility of being legislated out of more than one-half of 
all he is worth. While the value to be fixed upon our dol- | 
lars is in doubt, there can be no permanent prosperity. 
Every man who has anything to lose should rallv to the 
support of Secretary Gage. 

Private Counsel as As occasion served, the News Lit. 

Public Prosecutors. 1 Kit has in times past called atten- 
tion to the fact that privately hired 
counsel have no right to appear as public prosecutors. It 
is contrary to a well established public policy that they 
should. In days, happily long since passed and gone, 



prosecutions were conducted at the expense of persons 
alleged to have been wronged. Any man who had a little 
grievance to revenge, and some money to burn, could put 
any other man to the cost and humiliation of a criminal 
prosecution, either with reason or without it. Of course 
that was a condition of law practice pregnant with very 
grave scandals and abuses. It could not stand against the 
force of an enlightened sense of justice. Public policy 
needed that there should be a chauge, and public opinion 
demanded it. Criminal acts are not so much offenses 
against the individual as against organized society, and 
offenses are not punished to gratify the offended, but to 
the end that others may be deterred from doing wrong, so 
that the whole community may thereby be protected. 
Hence, all prosecutions are had in the name of the people, 
and are conducted by officers, who may not accept private 
hire, but who are duly compensated out of the public 
funds. In difficult cases of great gravity it may be that 
the prosecuting officer may feel the need of outside as- 
sistance, but all such aid should be independently selected 
by him, and paid for by the same source that he himself is 
remunerated. The obligations that attach to him should 
follow any and all persons that he may temporarily or 
permanently deputize to act in his behalf. Any other 
practice that has grown up is an abuse that our Supreme 
Court ought long ago to have corrected. That is what 
the highest Appellate Court of the State of Michigan did 
years ago. Its decision declaring the private selection 
and payment of counsel, aiding in prosecutions, to be con- 
trary to public policy, and setting aside a conviction on 
that ground, is to be found in the officially reported cases 
of that State. We commend its sound reasoning to all our 
Judges and prosecuting officers. We do not know that our 
own Supreme Court has ever been called upon to record a 
decision upon the point, but believe that some years ago it, 
ex cathedra, expressed the view that the practice was un- 
objectionable. The court, as constituted to-day, would 
hardly reverse the Michigan decision, founded as it is upon 
statutes like our own. At any rate, the various prosecut- 
ing officers have full control of this matter. Their consent 
is necessary before private counsel can acquire a standing 
to appear in their stead. Prosecuting Attorney Spinetti, 
of Police Court No. 1, has done well in announcing his de- 
termination to withhold his consent in such cases for the 
future. He will require more spinal strength than some 
of our Judges possess if he succeeds in resisting the im- 
portunities of lawyers in pursuit of a fee. We make these 
remarks not because of any case now pending, but because 
the subject is now up for discussion, and involves views 
that this journal has long held and often expressed. 

Nevada's The little pocket borough of Nevada has 
Lost Chance, just missed a chance to do a thing that 
would have gone far to have atoned for its 
many offenses, and to have redeemed it in the eyes of the 
country. It has the reputation of being a State where 
lawlessness is preferred to order, where murder is hardly 
esteemed a crime, and where almost anything can be done 
for money. It did much to confirm that reputation when 
its Legislature defied the moral sense of the country by 
repealing its existing laws against brutality, and legaliz- 
ing prize fighting. The Saturnalia of ruffianism that 
followed would have presented acurious commentary upon 
our boasted civilization were it not that Nevada was but a 
shameless exception to the better rule that obtains in 
other States. Some weeks ago a man named Adam Uber 
was lynched by a mob at Genoa, Nevada, under peculiarly 
revolting conditions. A part of the community, to their 
credit, did not sympathize with the lynching, and after- 
wards freely testified as to the facts. The whole matter 
went before the Grand Jury, the evidence was complete, 
and the line of duty plain. Yet eight of the jurors per- 
sistently refused to indict for any offense whatever. Tbey 
have since given out that they were influenced by the 
question of cost. The trials would have- been an expense 
to the county. So are all trials, yet nobody argues that 
murder should go unpunished on that account. If a state, 
or county, cannot deal with crime, because it takes a 
little money to do it, no reason remains for the existence 
of their governments. If Nevada cannot or will not govern 
herself upon humane principles, some way should be found 
to deprive her of her Statehood. 



January 29. 189S. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS I.KTTIiR. 



President McKinley With much justice Eastern news- 
and the papers, both orthodox and secular, 

p«idoning Po«ver. are criticising very sharply Presi- 
dent McKioley's frequent use of the 
pardoning power. The Chief Executive has been in office 
nearly eleven months, and during that time he has par- 
doned ninety-seven convicts, eleven of whom were counter- 
feiters, tweutv-two violators of postal laws, eight violators 
of revenue laws, and fourteen offenders against the national 
banking laws. The most of them were embezzlers; and it 
does not appear that they were notfound guilty in regular 
form, or that the}' were unjvstly sentenced. The Presi- 
dent seems to have been actuated by sentiments difficult 
to locate. The embezzler is usually a man of intelligence, is 
often wealthy, nearly in all cases is surrounded by an ex- 
cellent social atmosphere, and very generally makes his 
crime double by the betrayal of friends as well as the theft 
of money. It would appear that the criminals to whom the 
President is anxious to show his clemency are the least en- 
titled to favor. Embezzlement has in it an element of pre- 
meditation as well as ingratitude. The man who robs a 
bank of trust funds, or who appropriates the money of 
friends placed in his hands fur safe keeping, does so 
coldly and with certain knowledge of the crime he is com- 
mitting. As a rule, the embezzler is a calculating scoun- 
drel, who schemes to create the opportunity of his theft. 
The temptation by which he falls lacks every element of 
extenuation. 

The embezzler once caught, usually has the best legal 
talent; and as Shakespeare declares, " The gilded hand 
may shove by Justice, and oft 'tis seen the wicked prize 
itself buys out the law." This is as true as gospel; and 
the gold of which his victims are despoiled is expended in 
exhausting every legal resource and every shifty quibble 
before the tardy bolts of retribution close upon him. Presi- 
dent McKinley evidently disregards these facts, is not 
conscious of them, or weakly yields to the solicitation of 
personal or political friends. In neither case can he be 
justified. His unfortunate generosity finds no excuse in 
the precedent set by President Cleveland, who outraged 
every sense of decency by signing, during the last ten 
months of his term, no less than two hundred and twenty 
pardons, twentyone of which were for counterfeiters, nine- 
teen for violators of revenue laws, nineteen for violators 
of banking laws, and twenty-five for violators of postal 
laws. That Cleveland's clemency in these cases was one 
of the scandals of his administration should exert a re- 
straining influence upon Mr. McKinley. 

In view of the fact that this class of offenders are rarely 
convicted upon any but the most conclusive and positive 
evidence, that their crimes are premeditated, that the 
innocent always suffer, and that their sentences are rarely, 
indeed, out of proportion to their offenses, it is amazing 
that the President's unfortunate brand of mercy is not 
tempered with the leaven of common sense and a quasi re- 
gard for public morals. 

Official Etiquette A great many questions of etiquette 
In This Republic, have lately cropped up to bother this 
nation whose sovereignty is in the 
common people. The masses do not care a brass farthing 
who gets in first or who comes last. For order and con- 
venience sake, they fall 1 into line and let all comers take 
precedence in the order of their coming. If their vote 
could be taken it would almost certainly favor the applica- 
tion of that rule to all visitors at the White House. But' 
times have changed since a new elected President of the 
United States rode down to the capitol unattended, 
fastened his horse to a hitching post, walked up the steps, 
and was as effectively inaugurated as any of his successors. 
Plain Bill McKinley of Ohio, to accomplish a similar pur- 
pose, was last year accompanied by a grand pageantry, 
! such as is seldom witnessed in this country, and to see 
1 which many score of his countrymen paid hundreds of 
' dollars for a seat or a window on Pennsylvania avenue. 
j Simplicity is no longer the rule in regard to Administra- 
tion life in Washington. The President and all his Secre- 
j taries have just been bothered to death to tell how they 
: should receive an American born man who happens to have 
! been named by a number of sugar planters to preside over 
: the destinies of several of the original cannibal islands. 
: The wives of Cabinet Ministers are insisting that they shall 



remain seated at Presidential receptions and simply nod 
at visitors as they past by. They are also declining to 
call upon the wives of members of the House of Represen- 
tatives, no matter how highly they esteem them privately. 
Officially, they are declared' to be nobodies. Sir Julian 
Pauncefort would have kicked up a fuss if he could over 
his right to take precedence over the Vice President, but, 
upon referriug the matter home, was brusquely told that 
England was more concerned in maintaining good relations 
with the United States than in insisting upon a point of 
etiquette. Yet that is scarcely the view that one of our 
ablest ambassadors has just taken of his position atone of 
the greatest of Courts. Mr. White, our capable repre- 
sentative at Berlin, recently conceived the idea that be 
did not receive the attention accorded to other diplomats 
of equal rank, and officially made known his grievance in 
the proper quarters, declaring that he and his wife would 
not attend court functions until matters were changed. 
Promptly, Emperor Wilhelm issued instructions that all 
foreign representives should be treated with distinguished 
courtesy; stating, at the same time, that this instruction 
was issued at the instance of the United States Ambassa- 
dor who had complained. It looks as if we are going to 
become sticklers uver etiquette and that all the rivalries 
and heartburnings of European Courts are to find coun- 
terparts in Washington. 

Tho Milk Efforts upon the part of the daily press to 
in the create a strong public sentiment against the 

Cocoanut. water gas now generally in use throughout 
the city, may be accepted as a thinly dis- 
guised attack, inspired by the electric lighting companies 
upon their competitors, and carried on by the papers for 
reasons that are at once apparent. The claim that the 
suicides by asphyxiation that have taken place in San 
Francisco were due to impure and extra-poisonous gas, is 
a silly pretext, but it has been made to serve as a peg on 
which to hang all the arguments on that have been ad- 
vanced against its use. No account has been taken of the 
intent of those who died; and the records of the Coroner's 
office have been ignored in the mortality tables published 
by the papers. 

Water gas is a cheaper product than that demanded by 
the particular friends of electric light. To change the char- 
acter of illuminating gas in the city to a coal production as 
demanded by the sensation-mongers would mean an immedi- 
ate advance in the price of this necessary utility. Every 
family .that now consumes gas for heating or lighting 
would at once feel the additional tax, for it would not be 
possible to manufacture an illuminant solely out of coal 
without a substantial advance in its price to the user. 
Electricity and gas are in direct and active competition, 
and what the immediate and unavoidable effect would be if 
the price of gas were increased ought to be clear to the 
simplest understanding. 

There has been no general demand for improvement in 
the quality of illuminating gas in this city outside of the 
newspapers — all large consumers of electricity. An at- 
tack on the gas companies which would result in raising 
its price to the public would be a very valuable service 
to the electric lighting people of San Francisco. The 
newspapers are not making this fight for their health — 
nor for "the prevention of suicide by the gas route; and it 
will be the part of wisdom to bear all these very perti- 
nent and indisputable facts in mind. 

The Beauty A Mrs. Sangster, of New York, has re- 
Of Wrinkles, cently Deen lecturing in that city on the 
beauty of wrinkles. She declares that a 
wrinkle on the face of a fair dame is not to be despised, 
but, on the contrary, it is to be admired; that wrinkles de- 
note the possessor thereof to have acquired sublime vir- 
tues. They mean that the lady has philosophy of soul, 
great patience, and that she has been through fiery 
ordeals, and has issued therefrom improved mentally. 
Now, this is all very nice and consoling, but we fear that 
there are few women who will accept Mrs. Sangster's 
pretty theories and not try and combat them by adventi- 
tious aids. There are several women in San Francisco 
who have themselves treated weekly to face massage, and 
if not possessed of sufficient courage to have the operation 
performed, do it themselves. Young girls who have 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 29, £898. 



formed the pernicious habit of wrinkling their untroubled 
brows do nightly use certain face greases, and then, with 
the balls of their fingers, rub their foreheads till they 
glisten as do the silver ornaments on their dressing-room 
tables. Now, this is all wrong, according to Mrs. Sangster. 
Crows' feet are now to be admired, because they denote that 
the lady with those fretful lines about her eyes is or has 
been a student of serious literature; creases on the brow 
mark a spirit imbued with philosophy. A line on each 
side of the mouth shows t'.iat frivolity has been thrown 
aside, and that only matters of severe importance claim 
the line-mouth-marked person. Now, this sop thrown by 
Mrs. Sangster to the young lady who is on the shady side 
of forty is a very pleasing one, but, despite all lectures, 
we fear that the be-wrinkled beauty will not be appre- 
ciated. A face with wrinkles, whatever philosophy it 
might denote, cannot at this very material age command 
that admiration which a fresh and rosy one will. Men, 
unfortunately, are not highly intelligent animals, and men 
as a rule are attracted more by the physical beauty to be 
seen in a woman than by those mental charms which ought 
certainly — but don't — to captivate them. Perhaps in New 
York talent is less appreciated than beauty, but here in 
San Francisco our rosebuds, past and present, certainly 
do have the longer list of admirers. This matter of beauty 
in wrinkles is, however, respectfully referred to the Cen- 
tury Club — perhaps the members can add some informa- 
tion on the subject. Mrs. Sangster should certainly be in- 
vited to lecture before that highly intelligent organiza- 
tion. 

WoTien m The German Reichstag has passed a law that 
Factories, married women are not to be permitted to 
work in factories. The law is a sensible one. 
It is urged that women who have children cannot give 
them that care and attention which children of tender 
years need. The formulators of the law have brought it 
to the public attention that mothers of families neglect 
their children iu order to earn a small wage, and the re- 
sult has been that instead of their rearing future strong 
men and women, a weak and delicate race has been the re- 
sult. To prevent this danger which is attacking the en- 
tire nation, this law has been enacted. But the law does 
not exactly meet with the approval of the military author- 
ities. What the German nation, or rather Emperor, re- 
quires most is people. If women are not to be permitted 
to work, and thus add their mite to the maintenance of 
the household, men will not marry. The wage of laborers 
in Europe is small; and if the helpmeet of men cannot aid 
by their labor, then there will be no marriages — and con- 
sequently less population. Now, this law having been 
passed, and marriages consequently having become less, 
the German Government is in a quandary. Whether the 
law will be repealed, and it looks very likely that it will 
be, this question will not unnaturally crop up. Will the 
military force of the German empire be impaired by the 
enlisting of men who in their youth have been poorly 
nourished, and who are constitutionally weak through 
neglect in their early youth? This question, of course, 
only interests the war powers of Europe, but we who have 
no necessity of maintaining a great fighting force should 
learn a lesson from the action of the Reichstag in prevent- 
ing married women from working in the factories as being 
injurious to the future human race. Men in this country 
are paid a good wage for their labor, and employers of 
factory labor should not employ married women on their 
works. This question is too serious a one to be neglected. 

Brown and His C. O. Brown, the ex-Pastor of the First 
Confession. Congregational Church, of this city. 
dropped down upon his too lenient 
judges of the Bay Conference the other day in an unex- 
pected attitude. He left his foolish congregation in Chi- 
cago, which, by the way, only pays him $100 per month, 
and temporarily abandoned his wife and family to come 
Unit that all that he had previously denied was 
true. With his usual theatrical pose, he confessed, as- 
serted his repentance, and begged for forgiveness and re- 
instatement in the church. The Conference, with more 
than its usual perception of the fitness of things, did not 
take that view of his case, and dropped him from the roll 
of duly accredited ministers. That was right. Whatever 



Brown's future usefulness may be in this world, it is cer- 
tain that he could do nothing but harm in a religious con- 
gregation to whom his misdeeds would be sure to be 
known. The nature of his lapses from virtue would stick 
to his habilaments and be an ever menacing influence upon 
the morals of the young. His claim to forgiveness is based 
upon the alleged sincerity of his repentance. But we 
have only his word for that. He confesses that he has 
been a falsifier from the beginning. How, then, can he 
expect to have his word taken upon a question of which he 
alone can be the authority? He asks too much. He seeks 
to be re-established in a pulpit. If he were as conscious of 
his sins as he professes to be, he would have a realizing 
sense of his unfitness to occupy such a position. He would 
not desire to poison the atmosphere of the sanctuary with 
an odor that would make decent people hold their nostrils. 
If his alleged repentance be sincere, which his future 
course alone can determine, the church may very well for- 
give him and even take him into fellowship; but to again 
make him a teacher and leader in every good and perfect 
work is impossible. He too grossly betrayed his trust once 
to be tried again. In any event, he is too much of a trick- 
ster to be trusted. His defiance of all who held their 
hands level, his subornation of perjury, and his whole atti- 
tude for nearly two years past, show that he is a desper- 
ate man with more mental resources than conscience. He 
has as yet given forth no fruits meet for repentance. 
Even his confession has come so late as to be of more harm 
than good. It destroys the Overman woman, throws his 
family into despair, and appalls the silly people who stood 
by him. He had better have held his tongue and made use 
of his manifold resources to get on in the world. 



Merchants' Association The Merchants' Association has 
and made the investigation and dis- 

Devany'e Older. cussion of Devany's sidewalk 

order the subject of a special 
meeting, and has requested the Supervisors to defer final 
action until this influential organization has passed upon 
its merits. We shall be surprised if the merchants do not 
endorse the main principles of Supervisor Devany's order. 
It is not just that anyone should get something for nothing. 
As the News Letter pointed out last week, the space be- 
neath the sidewalk belongs to the city, and the tenant is 
charged by the owner of the property for its use. We 
have yet to find the merchant who does not think that be 
is paying all the rent that his business should bear. The 
owner of the premises is the man who is advantaged by 
the use the merchant makes of the city's space beneath 
the walks. Why, then, should he protest? Not one time 
in a hundred would the landlord increase his rent because 
of this proposed tax; for the reason that he is already col- 
lecting every dollar from his tenant that he can. 

The order requires revision. It is crude, and its scale 
of taxation is too high. The provision regarding project- 
ing show windows should be cut out; but the charge for 
stairways should stand. The order aims at an equaliza- 
tion of taxation, which the merchants should be glad to 
endorse, and if it were enforced it would remove objection- 
able obstructions from the streets. A careful investiga- 
tion by the Association, we believe, will result in the en- 
dorsement of the general principles involved in Supervisor 
Devany's order. 

THE courageous tight that Samuel C. Irving, of the 
ParafBne Paint Company, is making against the 
State Harbor Commissioners in order to compel a fair 
award of contracts for preserving piles used along the 
water front, is commendable; and, if the statements made 
by him are true, the action of the Board is a worthy ob- 
ject of attack. He alleges that the advertising for con- 
tracts for this wor'< was juggled, and that everybody ex- 
cepting the San Francisco Timber Preserving Company 
was Bhut out, and that that company got the contract at 
a figure very much in excess of his bid. The Paraffine 
Paint Company is a substantial and reputable concern, 
the charges made are very serious though not surprising, 
and it is to be hoped in the interest of fair play, econom- 
ical expenditure of the public funds, and the good of the 
State, that the bottom facts be uncovered and justice done 
both to people and honest contractors. 



January 29. 1898. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LliTTliK 



ACTORS OF EARLY DAYS. 

THE history of theatricals in San Franci.-co is, so far as 
the writer knows, still unwritten, but it is not the 
purport of this article to attempt anything of that nature, 
but merely to give a few reminiscences of early day plays 
and actors and some of the incidents connected therewith 
as may prove of interest to the News Letter's readers. 
The pioneers will tell you that the stars who cai^e to the 
coast in earliest days have never been eclipsed by those 
who came later, and speak enthusiastically of Kate Hayes, 
the elder Booth, Matilda Heron, James Stark, Mr. and 
Mrs. Lewis Baker, James Murdock. Laura Keene, Anna 
Bishop, Anna Thillon. and Lola Montez, and they will tell 
you that Edwin Booth first won rocognition here. Un- 
doubtedly this was so, but that Edwin Booth was not above 
very small parts in the earlier stage of his career will be 
proved by this copy of an old play bill: 

UNION THEATRE.— Thursday Evening, May 20, 1856. 
For the Benefit of Mrs. J. B. Booth will be presented 

THE LITTLE TREASURE. 

Mrs. Mildew Mrs. Judah Walter Maidenblush 

Gertrude Mrs. J. B. Booth Mr. W. Barry 

Lady Florence Mrs. Burrill Sir Charles Mr. J. B. Booth 

After which the Laughable Inierlude, littie toddelkiss. 

John Brown Smith Mr. Edwin Booth 

A ma nib a Mrs. Burrill 

To Conclude with the knight of arva. 

Baroness Buckmenstern Connor the Rash * 

Mrs. J Uriah Mr. Booth 

Princess Mrs. Booth Chebanea Mr.' -A. R. Phelps 

During the evening the American Brass Band will appear (first 
time) and discourse eloquent music. 

Which will show that people got the worth of their money 
in those days. 

The same month, May, 1856, Edwin Booth played Riche- 
lieu for the first time on any stage at the Metropolitan 
Theatre for the benefit of Charles Tibbetts, when he was 
supported by Mr. A. R. Phelps as de Mauprat; George 
Ryei as Baradas; C. A. King was Louis XIII., and Mrs. 
Claughley, Julie de Mortmar. 

The Metropolitan Theatre, which had been opened in 
1853 by Mrs. Catherine Sinclair, the divorced wife of Ed- 
win Forrest, and who managed it for some time afterwards, 
was comparatively a new bouse when Mrs. Julia Dean 
Hayne made her initial bow to the San Francisco public, 
June 24, 1856, in The Eunchbach. Her leading man was. 
Charles Pope, who accompanied her from New York; and in 
the cast were D. C. Anderson, "Bill" Barry, Mrs. Tho- 
man, Miss Mowbray, etc. Mrs. Hayne was a beautiful 
woman, and as Miss Julia Dean had been a popular actress 
in the East. Moreover, she was the bride of a scion of 
Southern aristocracy (having a few months previously mar- 
ried Dr. Arthur P. Hayne, son of the well-known politi- 
cian, Robert Y. Hayne, of South Carolina; so her success 
socially as well as professionally was great. Following 
Mrs. Hayne at the Metropolitan came the sisters Adelaide 
and Joey Gougenheim. They came from Australia. 

San Francisco's jeunesse doree of that period were very 
enthusiastic over Miss Avonia Jones, who made her first 
appearance at Maguire's Opera House in March, 1859. 
Miss Jones was a young lady belonging to one of the best 
families in Virginia, and San Francisco's best society was 
so largely composed of people from that State and the 
South generally that they were able to make her engage- 
ment a fashionable success. In appearance Miss Jones 
was of medium height, slightly built, dark complexion, ex- 
pressive black eyes which she knew how to use,' and masses 
of jet black hair^ which she wore in every part in which 
she appeared, whether as Parthenia or a society belle; in 
a braided coronet about her head. As an actress she was 
crude; and her chief success was in a play called Sybil, 
representing a tragedy which occurred in one of the South- 
ern States; it was founded on facts, and specially written 
for her. Miss Jones's admirers were not quite satisfied 
with her support, and efforts were made to have her ap- 
pear, once at least, with the English tragedian, James 
Anderson, who was then playiog an engagement here at 
the American Theatre, with the result that for his benefit 
Miss Jones appeared as Juliet to his Romeo, and made an 
extremely pretty, though not what might be called an ar- 



tistic, Juliet. She afterwards became the wife of G. V. 
Brooke, the eminent English actor, and played opposite 
characters to his for many years in various parts of the 
world. 

Mr. James Anderson, the English tragedian, appeared 
in a round of characters in what was a veritable Shake- 
spearean revival, supported by the best talent the city 
afforded. He opened in March, 1859, at the Lyceum Thea- 
tre, a place of amusement which had but a comparatively 
brief existence in the upper story of a building on the 
northwest corner of Washington and Montgomery streets. 
After his engagement at the Lyceum he appeared at the 
American, where each play was a series of triumphs. 
Among Anderson's support in his Shakespearean plays 
was Mr. J. H. Warwick, who was a great favorite with 
the public, and gave promise of becoming a prominent 
member of the theatrical world. But he decided to forsake 
the sock and buskin, and became a follower of Blackstone, 
and the stage thus lost what was regarded as a shining 
light. 

Those who remember dear old Mrs. Judah in her latter 
years will be surprised to hear that she took a "farewell 
of the stage," at Maguire's Opera House, March 30,' 1861. 
The play was The Love Chase,- she appearing as the Widow 
Green, a part in which she was unrivaled; Mr. Walter 
Leman was Sir William Fondlove; Mr. H. A. Perry, 
Neighbor Wildrake; and Sophie Edwin, Neighbor Con- 
stance; Mrs. Perry, who afterwards became the second 
wife of J. B. Booth, Jr., appeared as Lydia. Even at that 
early day Mrs. Judah was a tremendous favorite and it 
was with genuine regret that theatre-goes witnessed this 
adieu. But when her husband Mr. Torrence, lost his 
money, necessitating her return to the stage, his loss was 
regarded as a public gain, and until her death — nearly 
thirty years later — Mrs. Judah continued to be a popular 
favorite with all. In some roles she was perfect. Three 
in which she was particularly excellent were the Nurse, 
in Romeo and Juliet, Lady Franklin in Money, and Tabitha 
Stork in Rosedale. 



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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 29, 1898. 





We obey no wand but pleasure's."— Tom Moore- 



" '■pHE Girl From Paris " can only be 
1 judged by a comparative process. 
Is she better or worse tban the rest of 
her class ? " Vaudeville successes " sub- 
mitting to no rules of conduct do not prop- 
erly come within the jurisdiction of a 
dramatic critic. They are like the demi-monde which is 
not recognized and cannot be ignored. After accepting 
the existence of the class with becoming protest, comes 
the unsatisfactory task of placing them according to their 
own low standards. I should sav that The Girl Prom I'm is 
is rather more diverting than, — say /// Gay Neve York, 
and much less so than The Gaiety Girl, which is the best 
of its kind that I remember (The Geisha I put in a differ- 
ent category), but all of these pieces depend mainly upon 
the personal merits of their players. Courted Into (hurt 
is an example of what a company can do without a play. 

* * * 

Mr. George Dance, the author of T/u Girl from I'aris, — 
American for The Gay Parisienne, — has probably written 
more loose stage pieces than any other living man. He is 
a most fertile author of English pantomimes, — those mis- 
called orgies which some people fondly imagine are made 
for the children. Not so; they are male for the Johnnies, 
and it is only after solemn conference that English parents 
let the children go at all, persuading themselves, with 
that simple trustfulness of middle age, that they won't 
understand the vulgar bye-play and indecent inuendo, — as 
if their boys were not boys. If pantomimes are made for 
the children, how is it that the}' continue an undiminished 
business long after the Christmas holidays are over '.' All 
declassi plays are made for the Johnnies; and Mr. George 
Dance, having made a life-long study of 'what these liberal 
supporters of the stage want 1 , wastes little wit upon 
them, for, as everybody knows, they are lenient judges so 
long as they have a tantalizing exhibition of anatomy and 
lingerie. We have no real Johnnies here — thank goodness. 
Not that our youths are all Anthonies, but , Johnnyism in 
San Francisco is at most an inconstant pose. ., Our stage 
door population is infinitesimal. 

I suppose it is correct in noticing The Girl Prom Paris 
to begin with the skirt-shaking by the ladies of the com- 
pany, and I must say they fall something short in the in- 
delicate art of suggestion. "The girl " herself, played by 
Miss Mamie Gilroy, requires a falser modesty to be en- 
tirely successful. She gathers up her clothes in bunches 
as if she were crossing the mud with no one looking on, 
and she pulls up the hem of her gown to her chin, — the 
method so much in vogue since Yvette Gu.lbert burst upon 
the world— with wearying repetition. The realism of the 
servant's undergarments is rather startling. The ballet 
proper is even more hydrophobic than usual, and, by hav- 
ing its waists right under its arms, is able to combine the 
advantages of long skirt and short skirt dances. 

* * • 

The men of the company are much cleverer individually 
than the women, and they wrestle bravely with the stupid- 
ity of their parts. The cleverest of them is Mr. Harry 
Hermsen, who as Hans, the proprietor of the Spa Hotel 
at Schoffenburgen, does an amusing Dutch dialect carica- 
ture. The scene where he revenges himself on the Major 
by giving him a draught of mineral water, which we have 
previously seen him concoct from rusty horseshoes and 
bad eggs, is quite the funniest episode in the piece,— it is 
comparatively almost legitimate. Is it not pathetic to see 
how I single it out and rejoice in it ? Then they all line 
up in the approved fashion and sing a concerted number 
entitled " Tootle Tootle." The Major, though a stereo- 
typed warrior of vaudeville, becomes a fairly comic and 
fiery personage in the hands of Mr. J. C. Marlowe, and 
another well-executed performance is the Frenchman of 
Mr. William Blaisdell. Mr. Edgar Halstead has the prin- 
cipal part, and does his best to" make the utterly prepos- 



terous Reverend Ebenezer Honeycomb amusing — if he fails 
it is not much to his discredit. There are four nice clean 
young men in bicycle suits, and Mr. Phillips Tomes, one of 
them, with a speaking part of some prominence, sings a 
pretty note. 

Miss Mamie Gilroy has not the "dash, chic, sparkle," 
which we are repeatedly told the gay Parisienne posses- 
ses, and she needs all she can get to carry her variety 
part through with any effect; her enunciation of her songs 
is very indistinct. Miss Carrie Behr, as the grotesque 
servant maid, makes an event in the evening by singing 
" Sister Mary Jane's top note," for which she received 
four encores on Monday. Miss Sara MacLaren shows lit- 
tle appreciation of even such possibilities as Mrs. Honey- 
comb affords her; and Miss Clara Lavine as Norah, her 
daughter, seems to belong to another kind of piece; she is 
very conscientious in elaborating her final syllables. 

The mounting is up to Baldwin form, and both the 
scenes are pretty, especially the second. 

Larger than ever was the audience attracted to the 
Tivoli last Thursday afternoon by the fifth concert of the 
San Francisco Symphony Society. The success of the 
other four concerts was probably the principal cause, 
though no doubt the performance of Dvorak's "New 
World " symphony had something to do with it, as 
this symphony has a particular significance for Amer- 
ican audiences, — at any rate in its intention, be- 
sides being a work of much beauty and strong indi- 
viduality. In spite of this attraction I found last 
Thursday's programme the least interesting which Mr. 
Scheel has yet offered us. Mr. Scheel would probably 
find it impossible to satisfy every one in such a heterogen- 
ous audience, — I believe there are even some people who 
were bored by the Tschaikowsky symphony last week; and 
how large the popular element is was again made evident 
by the enthusiastic applause after the " Coppelia " ballet, 
— but I confess I grudge these Delibes ballets places on 
the symphony programme. They are too unimportant 
and entirely superficial, especially when there are such 
hosts of works by classic composers, which we have no 
chance to hear except at the symphony concerts, and for 
so few of which there is time during a season. 

Goldmark's "Im Fruhling" overture, which was the first 
number on the programme, is full of the fresh, open-air 
spirit which gives so much charm to his compositions. The 
plaintive Hebrew melody which followed it was the one 
touch of real melancholy in the whole concert: — it is beau- 
tiful, and sad as a dirge. The orchestra was in its best 
form throughout the concert, and the rendering of the 
Symphony was altogether delightful. 

The Symphony which will be played at the next concert 
is Brahms D Major (No. 2). Mr. Scheel will also play 
"Entrance of the Gods in Walhalla" (Rheingold), and 
works by Reinecke and Franz Liszt. 

* * * 

It is disappointing to see the Alcazar company's re- 
lapse after their late improvement. I do not find their 
performance of The Arabian Nights either interesting or 
amusing. They play farce of this description too roughly 
and inconsequently. It may be good business but it is bad 
art. Mr. Paulding is not in the cast and Miss Foster has 
little to do, and these are the two players who generally 
give the best tone to the Alcazar performances. Next 
week Victor Durand, a play by Henry Guy Carleton, will 
be produced. 

* * # 

Carletta, "the human lizard," is the most startling nov- 
elty at the Orpheum this week, — his contortions are 
weird and wonderful, and hardly to be believed when seen. 
The Knaben-Kapelle band is still proving a strong attrac- 
tion, — this is the last week of its engagement. Miss 
Dolline Cole is another of those fictitious female barytones 
of whom we have lately heard so many. "What are the 
wild waves saying?" is a bad blot on the bill. Next week 
the premier sensation will be "The Great Gautier" and 
his trained horses; there will also be the Nawns. Irish 
comedians, and the Brothers D , eccentric acrobats. 

* * * 

The Girl From Paris continues at the Baldwin for two 
weeks more, and on Monday, February 14th, the ever- 



January 29, 1898. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



welcome Bostoniaos will be heard in The Serenade. The 
company includes Messrs. McDonald, Barnabee, Frothing- 
ham. Cowles. Mrs. Jessie Bartlett Davis, Miss Josephine 
Bartlett, etc. 

The fine new organ lately erected in Trinitv Church was 
opened at a recital given by Mr. H. J. Stewart on Wednes- 
day evening last week. It is a modern electrical organ of 
beautiful tone and great power. Mr. Stewart will give 
recitals after evensong every Sunday for the next few 
weeks. 

Tlf Prarl of Pckin, a comic opera in three acts, will be 
produced next Monday evening at the Tivoli. Most of the 
members of the present company and Mr. Edwin Stevens 
are in the cast. 

AT THE BALL IN WASHINGTON. 



JLRE you not glad that I persuaded you to come, Sir 
il. William?" she exclaimed; tapoing his arm play- 
fully with her fan. " Is it not gay— the lights— the music 
— the handsome women ? " 

" I should have been quite happy with one handsome 
woman," said he, gallantly. 

" But the strains of that delicious waltz — do you waltz, 
Sir William, as well as you make pretty speeches ? " 

"At present," said he, " I have great provocation." 

" It is such a pleasure to be in the world again," she 
added. 

"True," he replied, glancing at her violet gown through 
his gold-rimmed eye-glass. 

"I have been so long in retirement," she sighed. 

"Is it very long since — hum — since the late lamented 
Mr. Smith ?" 

"It is three years since I lost my husband," she mur- 
mured. 

" Very sad — ah, hum! — but the loss is not irreparable. 
Madam — Behold one who is willing, nay, eager, to fill his 
place in your affections! " 

"Oh, Sir William!" 

" Do you still grieve for him then 1 " 

" I am beginning," she murmured, " to take a little in- 
terest in other people— — " 

"In me particularly," he pleaded. "Pray take a par- 
ticular interest in me; I am an orphan and alone in the 
world ! " 

" You are truly an object of compassion," she laughed, 
as she glanced at his broaS -shoulders, and at :the orders 
which adorned his coat. "Are you very hungry? lam." 

"Pardon.me; let us have some supper!" he exclaimed, 
"or an ice; there are icesin the next room." ■ 

"With all my heart," shereplied. 

"Curious what odd people one meets at these Charity 
balls," said> he as they went. 

' ' That is the amusing feature of the entertainment. " 

"There, ,for instance," be continued, "js Lady Har- 
court, in rose-colored satin and diamonds, and just back of 
her is a person — why, bless my soul! — a few years ago that 
person was keeping a millinery establishment!" 

"I suppose," said she, "that they both bought tickets?" 

"Of course — but here comes an old friend whom I have 
not seen for ten years." 

"Not that old man with the side whiskers," she ex- 
claimed. 

"He is just my age," said he, ruefully. "John, allow 
me to present you to Mrs. Smith; Mrs. Smith, let me make 
you acquainted with my old friend, the Honorable John 
Smith ! " 

"Delighted, I'm sure, Sir William. Oh, eh! — why, 
Maria, is that you ? " 

" Maria ! " echoed Sir William, raising his eye-brows in 
perfect astonishment. 

"Why, John, then you were not drowned in that ter- 
rible storm, three years ago, when we were both ship- 
wrecked ? " 

" No, love, I regret that I was not drowned " 

" Gad ! " exclaimed Sir William, so do I ! " — M. Q. Dixon 
in the Criterion. 

One don't have to wait for the Golden Jubilee to get the latest and 
most stylish Gents' Furnishing Goods at Carmauy's, 25 Kearny 
street. He keeps them all the time. 



H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 



SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS 

Fire and Marine Insurance Agents, 

309 and 311 Sansome St. - - - • San Francisco, Cal 

CORRESPONDENTS : 

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SIMPSON, MACK1RDY & CO 29 South Castle St., Liverpool 



Baldwin Theatre- 



Friedlander, Gottlob & Co.. 

Lessees and Managers. 

To-night, Sunday, and all next week. Edward E. Rice's superb 
spectacle, 

THE GIRL FROM PARIS. 

Magnificent scenery, gorgeous costumes, excellent cast, beau- 
tiful chorus, fifty people. 300 nights at the Herald Square 
Theatre, New York. 
Coming— The famous, original BOSTON I ANS. 

A I TL J_ Fred Belasco, Lessee. 

iCaZar I neatre. Mark Thall, Manager. PhoneMain254. 

Week of January 31st. First time at this theatre, Henry Guy 
Carlton's emotional melodrama, 

VICTOR DURAND. 

Magnificent settings; Parisian paraphernalia; three leading 

men in the cast. Every member of the Alcazar Stock Company 

In the cast. First appearance at this theatre of William H. 

Pascoe. 

Popular prices, 15c, 25c, 35c 50c. reserved. 

February 7th— CHARLEY'S AUNT. Matinee Saturday. 

Oi San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall, O'Farrell 

P P i\6 U m . street, between Stockton and Powells treets . 

Week commencing Monday. January 31st. The great 

GAUTIER, 

The most sensational horseback aot in the world; the Nawns, 
Irish comedians supreme; Brothers Damm, eccentric acrobats; 
tne Jaoksons, the ebony laugh-makers ; Al. Wilson. German 
comedian and yodler; Almont & Dumont, refined musical spec- 
ialties; Dolline Cole, America's female barytone; Carletta, 
artist elastique supreme; the Biograph, new life scenes. 
Reserved seats, 25c; balcony, 10c; opera chairs and box seats, 
50c; Matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday. Matinee 
Prices: Parquet, any seat, Sic. ; balcony, any seat, 10c; chil- 
dren, 10c, any part. 

T' , I ' /~\ M MRS. ERNESTINE KEELING, 

IVOM Upera riOUSe. Proprietor and Manager 

Every evening. The merry operatic fantasie, 

Tt1E PEARL OF PEKIN. 

A great cast; the imperial Chinese orchestra; piquant Chinese 
ballet; beautiful scenery; gorgeous accessories; superb Orien- 
tal costumes 

In preparation, a new opera, "Madelaine; or, The Magic Kiss." 
Box office always open. 
PopularPrioes .V 25oand50e 

Ml ' ' D ,,' | ' , Southwest corner 

eC haniCS laVlllOn. Larkin and Grove 

MINING FAIR 

AND KLONDIKE EXPOSITION. 

Opens Saturday evening, January 29th, 7;30 o'clock. Continuing 
five weeks. Special opening ceremonies. Fair machinery 
started by President McKinley from Washington. Grand, 
beautiful pageant. Music by Director Rogers and Bennett's 
band of 35 musicians. Everything in perfect working order. 
See the North Bloomfleld Mine: the underground mine and tun- 
nel; free moving pictures, Alaska views; two hundred exhibits. 
Admission 25 cents; children 15 cents. Tickets on sale Satur- 
day, all day. 

Pacific Coast dockey Glub <mgiesiae Tract). 

Racing from Monday, January 22d, to Saturday, February 
5th, inclusive, 

FIVE OR MORE RAGES DAILY, 

Rain or shine. First race at 2 p.m. S. P R. R. trains 12:45 and 
1:15 p. m daily. Leave Third street station, stopping at Valen- 
cia street. Returning immediately after the races. Electric 
car lines— Kearny street and Mission street cars every three 
minutes, direct to track, without change. Fillmore-St. cars 
transfer each way. 
F. H. Green, Secretary. S. N. Androus, President. 

DR. <JAS. G. GILBERTSON. Dentist. 

819 Market Street, third floor, room E, San Francisco 
Hours : 9 to 5, Academy of Sciences Building. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEk. 



January 29. 1898. 




IT doesn't look as if the New York Legis- 
lature would pass a wide open Sunday 
law including base-ball and theatricals. Several bills were 
prepared by some of the advanced legislators, and it looked 
as if New York might vie with Chicago and San Francisco 
in the go-as-you-please business. But they received a 
blow from an unexpected quarter — the Thespians are up 
in arms and declare that they are satisfied with six nights 
work, exclusive of matinees, and are willing to let well 
enough alone. Sacred concerts that are not sacred are 
numerous in this good city, and no doubt on the East 
side where there is a large Bohemian population, theatri- 
cals might flourish; but it would take years to accustom 
the habitues of the Broadway establishments to the Sun- 
day innovation. At all events the moral hayseeds are 
running the Legislature and there will be no substantial 
change in Sunday legislation. 

# * * 

What a boon for the surgeons was the first operation for 
the removal of the vermiform appendix! Straightway ex 
treme cases of stomach ache were diagnosed as append- 
icitis and no surgeon was happy until he had performed 
the operation for some favorite patient. If the patient 
died, there was a shrug of the shoulders, and it was 
charged up to bad physical condition; if he recovered it 
was a great triumph of surgical skill. A few weeks since, 
a New York paper reprinted from a foreign journal, with 
attractive illustrations, particulars of another great 
surgical triumph: a woman's stomach had been cut out from 
its allotted place in the human machinery, and the patient 
was going about her business as usual. What a glorious 
example to follow. Already the operation has been suc- 
cessfully performed by several aspiring surgeons in 
Chicago, — successful so far as removing the stomachs, but 
the patients speedily left for the other world, where such 
organs are neither necessaries nor luxuries. Surgery is 
progressive, but the line will have to be drawn somewhere. 

* # * 

J. Downey Harvey, the amiable young gentleman whom 
Dame Fortune has been overwhelming with inheritances 
of late years, had the cup of his ambition filled last week 
when he was elected a member of the swell Metropolitan 
Club, composed almost entirely of millionaires like D. O. 
Mills, C. P. Huntington, Hermann Oelrichs and George 
Crocker. The membership is limited and a man must show 
a very healthy bank account and a good social record to 
be admitted. However, he had Mr. Oelrichs as sponsor, 
and that gentleman is very persuasive in argument when 
a friend is concerned. Harvey celebrated the event by an 
elegant dinner. It was on account of this club business 
that Downey remained here a week longer than he 
expected. 

# # * 

Dame Rumor declares the Tammany politicians have all 
made big money on the advance in the elevated and sur- 
face railroad stocks, and James R. Keene is mentioned as 
the Chief Engineer of the deal. As soon as the result of 
the Mayoralty election was known it was whispered about 
that Rapid Transit was dead, and the new Mayor con- 
firmed the whisper in his inaugural address. Manhattan 
elevated has had a rise of about IS points since the New 
Year began and Metropolitan Street Railroad has ad- 
vanced 25 "plunks." The theory is that there will be no 
underground competition and the surface roads will divide 
profits with the "L." There will be no rapid transit for 
neither surface nor elevated roads can run more or faster 
trains. 

* * * 

The Chronicle's theatrical reviewer in a recent issue 
speaks in glowing terms of the great success which 
Manager Dan Frohman achieved as Director of the fort- 
unes of the Madison Square Theatre years ago when such 
clean plays as Hazel A'/,/.-, and Esmeralda had phenomenal 
runs. Could Mr. Robertson have mistaken Daniel for the 
veteran A. M. Palmer? 



Eastern people cannot keep pace with the Klondike 
situation. There are thousands who contemplate a trip 
Alaskaward when the season opens, but when will that be? 
they ask. Last week a telegram was printed in the 
morning papers that over six hundred people had sailed 
from a Pacific port to the Klondike. Another telegram 
was to the effect that the Government expedition convey- 
ing food to the starving people of Dawson was just about 
getting under way. How could sfx hundred people get to 
the Klondike when the Government hadn't even started? 
* * # 

How tired the mortuary editors of the big dailies must 
be of handling and rehandling their standing galleys of 
matter concerning Bismarck, Gladstone and the Pope. 
Regularly, every week come the cables, with news of how 
Bismarck is breathing his last, or Gladstone has something 
like apoplexy and the Pope fainted away from exhaustion. 
Out come the galleys ready for use, only to be replaced by 
succeeding cables that these great people are enjoying 
their usual good health. 

* # * 

Katharine Gray, the charming Californian artiste, is 
just recovering from a very serious illness, much to the 
gratification of her numerous friends. The New York 
weather this winter is bad enough to lay any one up. 

* * * 

Mrs. John R. Jarboe and daughter, Mrs. Jerome Case 
Bull, arrived last week and are comfortably quartered. 
They were not expected back so soon but are all the more 
welcomed in literary circles. 

* * # 

Kate Forsyth, the actress, is dead! She was John Mc- 
Cullough's favorite and was afterwards well known of 
prominent Californians, who will doubtless mourn her loss. 

New York, Jan. 24, 1898. Entre Nous. 

To the retined taste food must not only be good but served in an 
appetizing manner. Swain's, at 213 Sutter street, fully appreciate 
this fact. A splendid table d'hote dinner is served there every day 
from . r > to 8 for one dollar that is a model of taste, completeness and 
retined, delicate service. Swain's confectionery and pastries are the 
best, and orders will be promptly tilled by telephone or otherwise. 



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\A/ANTED:— Several trustworthy gentlemen or ladieR to travel In Cali- 
vv fornia for established, reliable bouse- Salary $780 and expenses. 
Steady position. Enclose reference and self addressed stamped envelope. 
The Dominion Company, Dept. 7, Chicago, 111. 



January' 29; 1898. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 







THE LAND OF DREAMS.-w». cuueit sriant. 

A MIGHTY realm is the land of dreams, 
With steps that hang in the twilight sky, 
And weltering oceans and trilling streams, 
That gleam where the dusky valleys lie. 
But over its sh adowing borders flow 

Sweet rays from the world of endless morn, 
And the nearer mountains catch the glow, 
And flowers in the nearer fields are born. 

The souls of the happy dead repair 

From their bowers of light to that bordering land, 
And walk in the fainter glory there, 

With the souls of the living, hand in hand. 

One calm, sweet smile in that shadowy sphere, 

From eyes that open on earth no more, 
One warning word from a voice once dear — 

How they rise in the memory o'er and o'er ! 
Far. off from those hills that shine with day, 

And fields'that bloom with heavenly gales, 
The land of dreams goes stretching away 

To dimmer mountains and darker vales. 
There lie the chambers of guilty delight, 

There walk the spectres of guilty fear, 
And soft, low voices that float through the night, 
Are whispering sin in that helpless ear. 

Dear maid, in thy girlhood's opening flower, 

Scarce weaned from the love of childish play, 
The tears on whose cheeks are but the shower 

That freshens the early bloom of May — 
Thine eyes are closed ; over thy brow 

Pass thoughtful shadows and joyous gleams, 
And I know by thy moving life that now 

Thy spirit strays in the land of dreams. 
Light-hearted maidens, oh, heed thy feetl 

Oh, keep where that beam of Paradise falls ! 
And only wander where thou mayest meet 

The blessed one from its shining walls. 
So Shalt thou come from the land of dreams 

With love and peacn to this world of strife, 
And the light that over that border streams 

Shall lie on the path of thy daily life. 



AT TWILIGHT — e- slair oliphant, in chambers' journal- 

Content thee, Love I Stretch forth no thought to seize 

Joys that beyond this twilight hour may lie ; 

The silver silence holds us, by and by 
To comfort into dark by soft degrees 
All cares that man has suffered or foresees; 

All doubt, all dread, all striving melt and die 

Into forgotten dreams, and we descry 
The Shadow and the Promise, only these. 
So leave the world unsaid, the song unsung, 

Forbear to praise or pray, so there may fall 

A moment in the Temple's ritual 
When even worship fails to find a tongue. 

Keep this one hour, that Love's heart may approve 

The sanctities and silences of Love. 



DEATH OF AN EPICUREAN — jean wright, in LCppiNOOTrs. 

Death loveth not the woful heart, 
Or the soul that's tired of living, 
Nay, it's up and away 
With the heart that's, gay 
And the life that's worth the giving. 

Seldom he stops where his welcome's surej 
Where age and want are sighing. 
Nay, it's up and away 
For he scorns to stay 
With the wretch who would be dying. 

Ah, it's youth and love and a cloudless sky 
The epicureau's after. 
Nay, it's up and away 
When the world's in May 
And life is full of laughter. 



1^^^^^^^^^ 



^^^^^1 * MIH ^ll«lH*l"ll*0' 



GET THE GENUINE ARTICLE! 

Walter Baker & Cols 

Breakfast 
Cocoa. 




Pure, 

Delicious, 

Nutritious. 

Costs Less than ONE 
CENT a cup. 

Be sure that the package 
bears our Trade-Mark. 



Walter Baker & Co. Limited, 

Established 1780, 

Dorchester, Mass. 



-4 



Brooklyn 
J-lotel ® ® 



Conducted on both the 

EUROPEAN AND 
AMERICAN PLAN- 
Bush Street, feet. Sansome and Montgomery, S. F 
This favorite hotel is under the management of 
Charl.es Montgomery, and is as good, if not the bes>t, Fumil\ and Bum 
ness Men's Hotel in San Francisco. Home comforts, cuiMne unexct lied, 
first-class service and the highest standard of respectability guaranteed. 
Our rooms cannot be surpassed for neatness and comfort. 

Board and room— Per day. $1.25, $1.50, $1.75. and J2; per week, $7 to 112; 
per month, $27.50 to $40; single room. 5ic.to$1. 

#5~Free coach to and from the hotel. 



Hotel Bella Vista 



1001 Pine street 



A First-class Hotel 



The Bella Vista is the Pioneer 
Fust-class Family Hotel of 
San Francisco. All the com- 
forts of a modern residence. 

MRS. A P. TRACY 



New York. 



Under new management. Rooms single or 
en suite. Restaurant unsurpassed. Ele- 
gant in all appointments at moderate 
prices. 

Reed & Roblee, Props. 
EUROPEAN PLAN. 



Madison Square, Broadway and 23d 
Street. 

HOTEL, 
BARTH0LDI 

New York 



Occidental Hotel. 



A quiet home, centrally located, for 
those who appreciate comfort and 
attention. 



Wm. B. Hooper, Manager. 



San Francisco 



RiOfls House, 



WASHINGTON, D, C 



THE HOTEL PAR EXCELLENCE" 

of the National Capital. First class in all 

appointments. 

An illustrated Ruide to Washington will be 

mailed free of charge, upon receipt of two 

2-ceut stamps. 

O. G. STAPLES, Prop. 

WANTED:— Several trustworthy gentlemen or ladies to travel in Cali- 
fornia for established, reliable house. Salary $780 and expenses. 
Steady position Enclose reference and self-addressed stamped envelope. 
The Dominion Company, Dept. 7, Chicago, 111. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 29, 1898. 




R. Anderson of Ben 
Lomond is the euvy 
of many. He is rich, distingut, lias a wife who is declared 
to be very chic, and a sister whose wealth runs up into the 
fanciful. They are hospitable entertaineis, and their chief 
desire seems to be the invention of some new way in which 
to get rid of their superfluous wealth. Last Monday they 
only took three boxes at the Baldwin, and took their 
friends there after an elaborate dinner. It is small won- 
der, then, that there are not a few somewhat desirous of 
cultivating these charming Britishers, and especially Mrs. 
AndersoD, whose accent is declared "to be too cute for 
anything." 

* # # 

One of the two brothers, which are inseparable, one a 
lawyer aud the other Heaven knows what, the one married 
and the other unmarried, but the married one appearing 
to be decidedly gay, makes many wonder what has be- 
come of his wife. She is present somewhere in the flesh — 
but they have agreed upon a separation — and such a queer 
separation, too. The wife frequently calls upon her dear 
Charley in his office and chats comfortably with him, it is 
presumed, and then takes her way to her hubbyless home. 
The husband also takes bis way where sometimes smiles 
await his arrival. The separation surely must have been 
sought by her, for it is said that of so amiable a disposition 
is he that he left strict orders when he went East not to 
let a man see her. Why, it was not so bad in the days of 
the Crusaders! They did, at least, let men see their wives. 
What is this fellow— a Turk? 

* # * 

F. Marion Crawford is dnly billed to appear as a lec- 
turer in the California Theatre some time next month. 
Mr. Crawford has relatives in California. His aunt is Mrs. 
Maillard, who lives at San Geronimo, and consequently the 
Hall McAllisters are his cousins. Unfortunately for some 
of us Mr. Crawford is married. His wife was a Miss Ber- 
dan, daughter of that General Berdan of rifle fame. He 
was an exceedingly handsome man, with a complexion 
which any girl would have been proud to possess, blue 
eyes, and a head covered with golden ringlets. Indeed, a 
god of a man in appearance. He is a natural-born story 
teller, and though his performances upon the rostrum have 
not beeu marked with any very great degree of success, 
still he should make a delightful talk upon Italian life. 

* * * " 

A certain literary gentleman, whose fame rests upon 
one or two accepted stories in an Eastern magazine, in- 
tends to abide here no longer. His reputation be regards 
as established and has an opinion that New York and 
Washington will fall in worshiping admiration at his some- 
what large feet. He intends to go into society. Unfortu- 
nately for New York society, the wife of the famous short- 
story writer has never taken up the cult of dancing, and 
so she is being initiated into the mysteries of the deux 
tempt with slow success. Washington and New York are 
to be congratulated upon their future acquisitions. 
» * # 

The young man who enjovs a hyphenated name and a 
fresh, enthusiastic nature, is going to have a basket din- 
ner. Since the girls have gone in for basket-ball he has 
been nervous and felt "out of it;" but now his merry, ring- 
ing laugh is heard once more, and he feels that he has 
not lived in vain. To the uninitiated it must be explained 
that this form of entertainment consists in having the 
dinner carried to your rooms in a basket. If you carry 
the eatables in a tin bucket you may still call it a basket- 
dinner. Ye gallant men who engage in street work, take 
note of this ! But the fortunate possessor of the hyphen- 
ated name is going to have his dinner basketed to him by 
some of his fair lady friends. Those who know affirm that 
the issue will not be in doubt from the initial throw-off. 
The game, rather the dinner, will consist of many courses 
with five minutes' time between, and the ladies have their 
play well in hand. 



"The widow's mite," — aye, we all know it, but the fas- 
cinating widow played high, and left her fifteen thousand 
dollar riog at the Mayor's dinner. Of course, gallantry 
will suggest the proper course to pursue, but truly a hint 
from a widow seemeth even as a hold-up. Messenger- 
boys, waiters, and detectives fail to find the lost circlet, 
the romantic have visions of rings and orange blossoms, 
maidens feel sure that they would have lost a stick-pin, 
or something UDto which no tender associations could be 
attached. And the widow seems pensive. The widow's 
might — aye, we all know it. The matrons wot full well 
thereof, the wary bachelors stand from under, the married 
men succumb thereto, while the girls, bud and blossom, 
give up the battle in despair. One of them, however, has 
taken slight comfort to herself by repeating, apropos of 
her rival, the woman's epitaph on her husband: "Tears 
cannot restore him, therefore I weep." 



Talking of widows — teaching the young idea how to kick 
seems like a good money-making scheme and surely just 
the thing for a demure young widow. The novelty alone of 
the dancing class ought to make it take, and, if report 
speaks truly, the mixture of languorous Castilian grace, 
with Hungarian girl and vivacity ought to be the means of 
tiding over the financial difficulties that have prompted 
this undertaking. Let us hope that this may be, and that 
thus the prancing charger will be retained at the riding 
school to add, by its spirited actions under the spur of its 
fair rider, to the Thursday evening celebrations. 

Eoyptian Hen.vi. Safe, Sukb, Pleasant A vegetable hair dye (or 
restoring gr-iy b ilr to Its jrlglaal col jr. Im-nedlate effect. Free from all 
objectl mable qualities. At all druggists and hair dressers. Langley & 
Michaels Co.. agents. 

cTiareu & Lloer-Beiair's 

NUITS. 

BURGUNDY WINES. 



Cbambertln 
lieaune 



Clos-Vouneot 

Pommard 
In Cases, Quarts, akd Pints. 



Ctaiblis (White) 
" 1878 



Q. M. PABSTMANN SOHN. 

MAINZ X HOGHMEIM, 

RHINE WINES. 



Geiseobeimer Liebfraumilch Hochheimer (own growth) 

Mareobrunner Rucdesheimer Steiowein (Buxbeutel) 

Johannlsberger. Scbloss Steinbe'-ger. Cabinet 

and KOESIGIN VICTORIA BERG, Bronze Label, 



So e Agents. 



CHARLES MUNECKE & CO. 

314 Sacramento St 



R. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL 
CREAM. OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER. 

Removes Tan. Pimples. Freckles, Motb 
Patches, Rash, and Skin Diseases, and 
every blemish on beauty, and defies de- 
tection It has stood the test of 48 years 
aad ts so harmless we taste It to be sure 
It is properly made Accept no counter- 
feit of similar name Dr. L. A Sayre 
said to a lady of the ham-ton (a pa- 
tient): As you ladies will use them, 1 
recommend 'Gouraud's Cream' as the 
least harmful of all the Skin prepara- 
tions." For sale by a'l Druggists and 
Fancy Goods Dealers in the United 
States, Canadas, and Europe. 

FERD. T. HOPKINS, Prop'r, 

37 Great Jones St., N. Y. 

DR. CHRISTENSEN, Dentist, 

Has removed to 3720 Mission street, between Twenty-third and 
Twenty-fourth. Four specialists in attendance. 

Phone— Mission 160. 

\A/ANTED:— Several trustworthy gentlemen or ladles to travel In Call- 
fornia for established, reliable house. Salary 1780 and expenses. 
Steady position. Enclose reference and self-addressed stamped envelope. 
The Dominion Company, Dept. 7, Chicago, 111. 




January 29, 189S. 



SAX I-RANCISCO NF.WS LETTER. 



INSURANCE 



THE Insurance Commissioner has revoked the license to 
do business in this State of the Fidelity Mutual Life 
Association, an assessment company of Philadelphia. Some 
time ago, Commissioner Clunie commanded all assessment 
companies to comply with the law requiring that there 
shall be set forth in their policies and applications that the 
liabilities of members is not limited to fixed premiums. 
With the exception of the Fidelity Mutual Life all associa- 
tions doing business here, both home and foreign, at once 
complied, and the Commissioner's action is in consequence 
of the Fidelity's persistent refusal to conform to Mr. Clu- 
nie's interpretation of the law. 

George W. Turner of the Northwestern National is mak- 
ing a month's tour throughout the coast States. 

George L. North of the Provident Savings Life Society 
is in the Hawaiian Islands, establishing an agency for his 
company. 

The general agency firm of Syz & Co. has moved into the 
premises lately vacated by the Alliance Insurance Com- 
pany in the Insurance Block. 

The Pacific Surety company has new offices in the Safe 
Deposit Building. 

Charles J. Okell, Pacific Coast manager of the Employ- 
ers' Liability, has moved to 401 California street. 

M. O. Brown, for many years Western manager of the 
Westchester Fire Insurance Company, was elected secre- 
tary of that company this month. 

The Globe Insurance Company has sued its former San 
Francisco agent, E. W. S. Van Slyke, to recover $1320 
premiums alleged to have been collected by him. 

The coast fire underwriting was profitable last year. 

Charles S. Watson, manager of the Employers' Liabil- 
ity's northwest department, visited San Francisco last 
week. 

Manager Stolp of the National Life is in Vermont. 

Charles A. Laton has received the appointment of 
Pacific Coast manager of the Traders' Fire Insurance Com- 
pany. 

Frank W. Dickson has been appointed assistant mana- 
ger of the Royal Exchange's Pacific Department. 

Robert Dickson is now permanently located in New 
York. 

Colonel C. Mason Kinne has returned from a two weeks' 
trip into the interior. 

The literary programme for the annual meeting of the 
Fire Underwriters' Association next month will be as fol- 
lows: "Our Duty to the State," D. Ostrander of Chicago ; 
"The Study of Law as an Aid to the Insurance Man," 
Chester Deering; " Stipulation and Waiver," T. C. Van 
Ness; "The Mistakes of Moses," T. Edward Pope; 
" Special Agents," Ed. Niles; " Origin, Growth and Effect 
of Valued Policy Laws," F. G. Argall; "Assistant Mana- 
gers," W. H. Bagley; "The Local Agent and Adjust- 
ments," R. A. Luke; "Eloquence of a Smile," Wm. Sex- 
ton ; "Talking Back," William Maris; "The Practice 
of Fire Underwriting;"Young E. Allison of Louisville, Ky. ; 
" The Value of the Sprinkler," W. S. Davis; "The Agnos- 
tic Elements of Underwriting," Amos Sewell; "An Insur- 
ance Topic," H. McD. Spencer. 

A. L. Reid, an old-time insurance man, who has been 
rusticating on his ten thousand acre ranch near Oroville, 
has leased this property, and returns to the city with a 
view of getting into the Underwriters' harness a»ain. 

The Insurance base-ball league has been organized, and 
clubs have been formed by the following offices: Alliance, 
Firemans Fund, Home & Pbcenix, Lion & Imperial, Pala- 
tine, National & Springfield, Pennsylvania, American 
Svea, and Agricultural. 

Sheppard Homans, the eminent actuary, died suddenly 
in New York City on January 8th. Mr. Homans was in his 
sixty-seventh year, was actuary for the Mutual Life from 
1855 to 1875, at which time he organized the Provident 
Savings Life. He originated the American Experience 
Table of Mortality. 

Oall at Rosekran?<ft Co , No. 342 Sutter street, and inspect their 
"Crown Incand isce 11 Gas Burner." This burner has no equal, giv- 
ing them >it light at the suiilUHt cjst of any other gas-burner. 
These gentlemen supply mantles for all gas-burners. 



INSURANCE. 



FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE 

Firemans Fund 

INSURANCE COMPANY, OP SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Capital, $1,000,000. Assets, $3,500,000. 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited), OF MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 
SOLID SECURITY. OVER $9,000,000.00 RESOURCES 

CH AS. A. LATON, Manager, 439 California St., S. F. 
Fire Insobance. 

CONNECTICUT FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF HARTFORD. 

Capital Paid Up »l,0O0,00O 

Assets 3,300,018 

Surplus to Policy HolderB 1,668,332 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager. 

Pfll IM M nnvn San Francisco Agent, 

UULIN 1*1. DIMU. N. W. Cor. Sacramento and Montgomery Sts.,S. F. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSURANCE CO., LIMITED, 

OF LIVERPOOL. 
Capital 16,700,0011 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., Agents, 

No. 816 California St., S. F 

Founded A. D. 1712 

Insurance Company ot Nortn ftmerica 

OF PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 

Paid up Capital 13,000 ooo 

Surplus to Policy Holders 5.022.016 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent, 412 California St., S. F 



ROYAL EXCHANGE ASSURANCE, OF LONDON, 

Incorporated by Royal Charier, A. D. 1726. 

Capital Paid Up, J3 446,100. Assets, S2I.581.4I3 

Surplus to Policy Holders, 88,980.251. 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manag'fr. B. J. SMITH, Assistant Manager. 

501-5 3 Montgomery St., comer Sacramento. 

PHOENIX ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON Established i*b. 
PROVIDENCE-WASHINGTON INSURANCE CO. i°°or P ora.ed "»» 

BUTLER & HALDAN, General Agents. 

418 California St., S'F. 

THE THURINGIA INSURANCE COMPANY. 

Of ERFURT, GERMANY. 
Capital. »2,250.0O0 Assets. 810,P8i.248. 
Pacific Coast Department : 204-208 SANSOME ST., S. F, 

VOSS. CONRAD& CO.. General Managers 

Accident Employers Liability and Fidelity Bonds Insurance 

THE GUARANTORS FINANCE COMPANY OF PHILADELPHIA. 

ARTHUR C DONNELL, Gen Agent Pacific Coast. 401 California St. 
pppcNJ 128 O'Farrell street, 

Coal Merchants "wcSd^nd cnaTcoaT 

DDAC Genuine Wellington 

DrWO. Coal a specialty. 

Orders promptly Delivered. Telephone Red 1581 




SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 29, 1898. 



r/Fz 




The Jubilee day of California has passed 
Toe Close of a in the due course of events, and another 
Golden Epoch, link has been forged in the historical 
chain which binds the glories of the past 
firmly and fast in the memory of all who claim kindred with 
the Golden State. The celebration was a success in a gen- 
eral way. and the procession of old and young— the pioueer 
and his descendants— was something the like of which will 
never be seen again in this city. Never again will so many 
of 1 he old boys be gathered "together alongside of those 
upon whom their mantle is to descend. They have fought 
a good fight, and resting upon their well-earned laurels. 
can peacefully await the closing in of the shadows now 
gathering for them in the West, where the sun of their 
life is slowly sinking beneath the waves of Time, confident 
that the work begun by them will be carried on by worthy 
representatives, their noblest monument — the great, ever 
growing, city by the threshold of the Golden Gate. The 
only mistake in the arrangements was keeping the mining 
element too much in the background. Four old men were 
mixed up in line who should have headed the procession. 
They were the companions of Marshall, working with him 
in the mill-race when the historic piece of gold was picked 
ud. The celebration was in honor of this event in the his- 
tory, not of a State alone, but of the world, and the posi- 
tion of honor was due to the men who assisted in making 
1I1U history, No one can paiusay this, nor that the 
miners themselves should have been the next most prom- 
inent feature of a parade, celebrating the glories of min- 
ing and an important discovery of gold. A good many 
people were impressed by a lack of individuality about a 
precession which they naturally expected to lean more 
toward an industry which has done so much to build up 
the State after laying the foundation of its prosperity. 
So grand, however, was the display made by the military 
and civic organizations, not to speak of the barbaric mag- 
nificence of the Chinese detachment, that defects can be 
passed over lightly as errors of judgment, avoiding an un- 
friendly criticism, which might tend to mar the amities of 
au occasion when the best of fellowship should prevail. 

From the news coming in from the 
Prog-essive Mining different mining sections of Cali- 
ln Cai forma. forma, the excitement over the 

bonanza reports from the North 
docs not seem to have bad a very disturbing effect. Pros- 
perity reigns as a rule in most of the old-time mining 
camps, and legitimate development work was never more 
active than at the present time. An outside demand is 
again noted for properties in this State, with a disposition 
apparent to do business on a small scale with a careful in- 
vestigation of all offerings. The fly-by-night promoter is 
not in evidence. He has overdone the game and has 
starved at it. In the future the only prospect of success 
for the craft depends upon a reputation for honesty and 
far dealing, which is something the old brigade cannot 
b mst about There is consequently an opeuing for new 
men whose skirts are clean; mer. v-ho use judgment in the 
sel< dim of their wares, and who will frown down all at- 
tempts at inflation at the suggestion of the mining hog in 
London and elsewhere, whose policy is expressed in the 
stat ment, ' that cobble stones are good enough for flota- 
t 0.1 purposes, provided they are properly gilded." 

Under the heading of " English Capi- 
Drooping Under .ts talists are so Dull," the Mining and 
Own Weight. Electrical Review, in its recent elab- 
orate and well-edited Jubilee edition. 
Bays: "The Great Northern Industrial Gold Company, 
Limited, is the high-sounding title of a ne v combination 
which sets forth in a six-page prospectus th' many advan- 
tages to be derived by purchasing stock from the pro- 
moters, who claim to own valuable mining property in 
Plumas County, near Quincy. California. The companv is 
capitalized for £400,000, with headquarters in London. 
One or two of the mines named in the prospectus may be 
good properties, and we are informed tbey are, but not 
worth anything like what the company claims them to be. 
It is known in London that $20,000 has been expended to 



start the big bonanza (?) scheme, but as capital is shy in 
the English metropolis, and speculators have passed 
through the eye teeth cutting stage, only $5000 worth of 
the company's paper has found takers. Perhaps English 
capitalists are waiting for their American cousins to bite 
first. Charles Edward Ertz, the promoter, could not do 
better than to place the project before the people who are 
apt to know more about the property than the residents 
of London town, whose fogs and other afflictions dull their 
sense of appreciation." The more one studies this "Com- 
edy of Errors, chapter by chapter, full of glaring exag- 
gerations, the more convincing becomes the impression 
that some of the experts employed should take a course 
of scholastic training before appearing in public agair. 
People who cannot figure up the acreage correctly in a 
number of ordinary quartz claims can scarcely be ex- 
pected to estimate reliably On ore reserves, or any other 
more or less simple calculation in mining engineering. 
However, the scheme is virtually " a dead cock in a pit," 
killed by its own immensity. There are too many indica- 
tions of Klondicitis or some other malarial affection about 
an offer to dispose of $88,000,000 for $2,000,000. The sprat 
set to catch the mackerel is too utterly insignificant a 
bait to fool the most credulous. It may not be generally 
known that the property in question has been condemned 
by engineers of the California Exploration Company, after 
a long and careful investigation, and also by other experts 
who have visited it in the interests of capital. In face of 
this, our London scientists can see 11,000,000 tons of $8 
ore in sight, sufficient to keep 250 stamps running for 100 
years without as much as leaving the surface workings. 
Behold a genuine case of " where doctors differ." 

There are signs of life again on the mining 
Pine Street stock exchanges, and brokers and dealers 
Waking Up. look forward to more active trading, which 
will start money moving more freely. There 
are hopes that Sierra Nevada will open up well on the 
900 level and the Reilly tunnel, where work is now going 
on. A showing of ore in this quarter would boom prices 
elsewhere by creating a demand for stocks. These are 
scarce among the public just now, and in evidence of this 
is the advance noted on purchases which do not at times 
exceed a couple of hundred shares. A few thousand share 
lots picked up in a single session would be likely to double 
prices up in many cases. Justice has been firmly sustained 
all through the dull times, and the continued development 
in the mine would warrant a higher range of values than 
the stock has touched yet since the new strike was made. 
The whole town is ripe for an upheaval in the mining mar- 
ket, and a good, steady boom in this quarter would put 
the Klondike nonsense out of the heads of a good many 
folks who have no more right to venture into those high 
latitudes than they have to try and make Samoa on a bicy- 
cle. It is only lack of excitement here which suggests such 
an insane departure. 

Colonel W. C. Albergerhas just returned 
Gridironing the from an Alaskan surveying expedition, 
New Eldorado, locating a railroad route over the Chil- 
coot Pass. Mr. Henry Bratnober is in 
London with a proposition to run a road over the Dalton 
trail, and a couple of New York companies are figuring on 
lines which will parallel the White Pass and Stickeen route. 
In the meantime the Canadian Pacific has a party out, 
with the idea of flanking the ocean frontage by a connec- 
tion with Calgarry, a switch-off northern terminus from 
the main trunk line. A few enterprising contractors, with 
1 an eye to business, might run up a Palace Hotel or two 
along the different routes. With the addition of saloon 
steamboats on the Yukon, the annoyances of travel would 
then be reduced to the mosquito plague and climatic inter- 
ferences with the comfort of travelers. 

There is a possibility that a sale of some 

A Sale Aoout California property will be concluded dur- 

Conciuded. ing the coming week. English capitalists 

are the purchasers in this case. The 

property in question has already been favorably mentioned 

in the News Letter, with full confidence that it will bear 

out all that is said of it, on a fair capitalization. 

THE latest mine to bob up in London is the old Drum- 
mond mine, which has just appeared as a limited cor- 
poration, with a capital of $280,000 in round numbers. 



- , ■" *■- — M1M— MH— !■ "Mj'iMUfc. 




CO 
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CO 







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mrtm 
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CO 



January 29, 189R. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



•3 




' Hear the Crier!" "What the devil art thou?" 
'One that wlllplav the devil, sir, with you." 



fA R. LANE of the Palace Hotel, who put in an appear- 
jl arjce last Monday at the Receiving Hospital to have 
his abrasions on his face mended, having fallen off his 
horse when ihe parade started, should take a lesson to 
heart. Every man in California entertains the hallucina- 
tion that he knows how to ride, and the spectacles that 
some of the aides presented on the day of the great pro- 
cession leads one to believe that riding is an almost un- 
known art in California. Gentle Mr. Lane, before you 
again venture on a steed do for Heaven's sake essay its 
trial upon a rocking horse. One can't be a Tobin, a 
Hobart or even a Wilfred B. Chapman at once, and really 
Mr. Lane came nearer the performances of the ex-Talbot 
Clifton than any man one knows of. It was an outrage to 
permit these defenseless creatures to ride. The trouble 
was they only fell off unhurt and then ran shrieking for 
help to the nearest hospital or dispensary. But their 
fiery chargers maimed and almost killed several specta- 
tors who lined tbe streets, and whose bosoms the minute 
before swelled with civic pride in watching these eccentric 
performances. 

1WI R. Harry W. Patton, of Democratic fame and some 
j I notoriety, has sued a thoroughly moribund paper in 
Los Angeles for $50,000 for damaging his reputation. Un- 
happy Harry. Harry was six years ago working for $1 
per diem as an agriculturist in Los Angeles County. Luck 
threw the Banning Herald in his way, and luck made Papa 
Evans of Eiverside select him as the man to influence the 
Legislature to form the county of Riverside — and luck for 
him made Budd, Governor. Now, there are some good 
Democrats in Los Angeles County, but Budd, who has in 
the South favored every obscure and unknown newspaper 
man, has delighted to honor Patton. He has made him 
trustee of the Highland's Insane Asylum, trustee of Whit- 
1ier — and now Bank Commissioner. No wonder it is asked 
in Los Angeles whether Patton is the only Democrat in 
that part of the State. Mr. Jim Budd should ask some 
other Democrat beside Harry Patton what is thought of 
him south of the Tehachapi. It would make his ears tingle. 

THE Reverend Mr. C. O. Brown in the minds of most 
citizens is more despicable than ever. His confession, 
if a long hypocritical and whining cry for mercy can be 
called one, only makes the average man wish that he could 
have the reverend gentleman at the mercy of a stoutly- 
shod foot for the space of one short half hour. It is 
generally thought right and proper for a man to shield a 
partner in an alleged crime, but when this fellow Brown 
plays the baby act he is more to be despised than ever. 
It is to be hoped that he will be kicked out of every fold, 
and that he may become a street preacher before an 
audience armed with a good store of well-developed goose 
eggs. 

PROFESSOR Bernard Moses of the State University is 
an ambitious man, and it is said he wants to be the 
President of that institution, and is working tooth and naii 
for the appointment. He, it is affirmed, has the support 
of Regent Deneicke, the two Budds, and Regent Reinstein. 
His attitude is, of course, winning for himself golden opin- 
ions of the other professors, who are strangely unanimous 
regarding his unfitness for the position. There is alto- 
gether too much wire pulling over at Berkeley for a seat 
of learning. 

IT is generally believed that what is told a doctor is held 
as sacred by him as is a confession to a priest. A young 
doctor, whose name shall be withheld, until he sins again, 
was the recipient of a confession on the part of a man ad- 
dicted to the use of drugs. The tale was told him secretly, 
and advice was asked. What did this amiable young man 
do but tell everybody what the subject of the consultation 
had been. He had better take a hint in time and for the 
future keep a closed mouth. 



Wll EN the agitation was started against the nickel-in- 
the-slot machine, the innocent and much-wronged 
saloon and cigar man declared that there was " nothing in 
it" for thorn. Not at all. They only maintained that ex- 
pensive and decorative machinefor the amusemeut of their 
customers, and that they lost by it. Their attitude was 
much admired by the patrons of the machine, and they 
were regarded as an oppressed and harassed body of re- 
spectable citizens. And so they are ! But their state- 
ments do not bear the impress of truth. A nickel-in-the- 
slot machine was opened the other day before some of the 
patrons, and they then learned of the profits to the saloon 
keeper of such a machine — it was only $20 odd, and this 
was in an obscure saloon — what, then, can it be in a well- 
known one on a prominent street. 
IT may not be generally known but the position of driver 
to a laundry wagon is a most lucrative one. A man 
with an exquisite tenor voice is doing that work, and he is 
quite well-beloved by scores of fashionable women who 
wanted to rescue him from that ignoble situation and get 
him a position in some wholesale liquor store or other highly 
honorable shop. The young man who sings in church grew 
somewhat indignant and explained that he made more as 
a laundry-driver and in the commissions on bills be collected 
than he could possibly as a clerk. "Can't we do you a 
favor," said a highly influential dame to the proud singer. 
"Yes, you can," said he, "if you will." "We certainly 
will," four women chorused. "Then get me an invite to 
see the next man hanged" — and the ladies now only praise 
his voice and not his looks. 

IF rumor lieth not in regard to the spirit and temper of 
the men working in the Union Iron Works there will 
shortly be a strike on hand. It is claimed that the men 
complain of long hours and an insufficiency of pay, and 
that they are cut when not working even when it is not 
through their own fault, but because of some breakdown in 
the engines. This should not be neglected by Mr. Scott. 
He is regarded as a good and just man and it is certain 
that he would rectify a grievance if he knew of its exist- 
ence — but the fact remains that there is much grumbling 
among those swarms of mea laboring in the Union Iron 
Works, and it would take but little for it to break out in 
the form of a strike. 

WHICH is the more profitable business: being a member 
of the stock board or raising puppies for rich people? 
This is a question which agitates many. Now a stock 
broker in the old country, according to their antique 
ethics, is somewhat of a gentleman. Dukes dabble in stocks 
and their illustrious names appear as members of boards, 
but then they don't raise puppies except their own — and 
some of them have bountiful crops — but then to what class 
does a man belong who is a dog-raiser for another? This 
question — now that the whole matter of society and who 
should belong to it is being agitated — this question must 
be settled. Are we to accept a kennel-keeper as one of 
the elect? 

SN innocent-looking, little, old gentleman from the 
Antipodes was recently captured in this city for hav- 
iug committed a malpractise in New Zealand. He is to be 
returned; and in all probability he will be hanged. A local 
doctor, in the employ of the city waxed frightfully wroth 
over the brutality of English laws. "Why," said he, "no 
jury in this country would even think of hanging him. Was 
it not with the woman's consent the deed was done?" And 
the by-standers agreed with him. It is a vast pity that 
some of the rigor of the English law is not introduced into 
California. In British Colonies law is respected. Here it 
is despised. 

TROOP A of the National Guard, which has won for it- 
self much evil notoriety through the memory of the 
famous Captain Jenks of horse-starving fame, made a wry 
exhibition of its incapacity in the great parade held last 
Monday. The men could hardly ride, or rather not ride at 
all. Even the trumpeter did not know how to blow his 
own horn. 

THE Klondike craze has no abatement. A certain 
lunatic learning that the hills across the bay were 
snow-covered determined to harden himself by spending a 
night in the snow on a windy hill- top. He did it, and now 
he thinks he will be able to stand any degree of cold in 
Klondike provided he does not first die of the pneumonia,*.' " 



•4 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 29, 1898. 



BANKING. 



Bank 0! British Columbia. 

Southeast Cob. Busb and Sansomb Sts. 
Incorporated by Royal Charter, 1863. 

Capital Paid Dp 18,000,000 

Reserve Fund 1500,000 

HEADOFFJCE 60 Lohbard Street, London 

Branches— Victoria, Vancouver, New Westminster, Kamloops, Nan 
tamo, Nelson, Sandon, and Kaslo, British Columbia; Portland, Oregon 
This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available In all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon Its Agents, as follows : 

New York— Merchants' Bank of Canada ; Chicago— First National Bank ; 
Liverpool— North and South Wales Bank; Scotland— British Linen 
Company; Ireland— Bank of Ireland; Mexico— London Bank of Mexico; 
South America— London Bank of Mexico and South America; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China; Australia and 
New Zealand— Bank of Australasia and Commercial Banking Company oi 
Sydney, Ld ; Demeraha and Trinidad (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 

Bank of California, San Francisco. 

Capital and Surplus, $6,000,000 

WILLIAM ALVORD President | CHARLES R. BISHOP.. Vice-Pres't 

ALLEN M.CLAY Secretary THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

S. Prentiss Smith.. Ass't Cashier 1 1. F. Moulton 2d Ass't Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS. 
New York— Messrs. Laidlaw & Co.; the Bank of New York, N. B. A. 
Baltimore— The National Exchange Bank. Boston— The Tremont Na- 
tional Bank; Chicago— Illinois Trust and Savings Bank: Union National 
Bank. Philadelphia— National Bank of the Republic. St. Louis— Boat 
man's Bank. Virginia City (Nev.)— Agency of The Bank of California 
London— Messrs. N. M.Rothschild & Sons; Paris— Messrs. de Roths- 
cbild Freres BERLiN—Direction der Disconto Gesellschaft. China, 
Japan and East Indies— Chartered Bank of India. Australia and China 
Australia and New Zealand— The Union Bank of Australia, Ltd., and 
Bank of New Zealand. 
Letters of Credit issued available in all parts of the world. 

The San Francisco National Bank, 

Southeast Corner of Pioe and SaDsome streets, S. F. 

Jas. K. Wilson President. E A. Brcgpierb, Vtce-President 

Lewis I. Cowgill, Cashter. 

Capital *500,000 

Directors: Jas. K. Wilson. E J. Staples, Wm Pierce Johnson, Geo. 
A. Pope, E. A. Bruguiere, Ed. G. Lukeus, Charles c. Judson. 

Aoents: New York— Hanov, r National Bank, Chase National Bank; 
Boston— National Bank of the Commonwealth. Philadelphia— Drexel & 
Co. Chicago— Continental National Bank. St. Louis— The Mechanics' 
Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London— Brown, Shipley & 
Co. Paris— Morgan. Harjes & Ce. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San FranGisco. 

33 Post Street, below Kearny, Mechanics' Institutb Building. 

Guaranteed Capital 11,000,000 Pald-Up Capital 1300,000 

JAMES D. PHELAN. President. S. G. MURPHY, Vice-President. 
GEO. A. STORY. Cashier. JOHN A. HOOPER, Vice-President 

Directors— James D. Phelan, L. P. Drexler, John A. Hooper, C. G. 
Hooker, James Moffltt, S. G. Murphy, Frank J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy, 
and Joseph D. Gram. *' 

Interest paid on Deposits. Loans on approved securities. 
Deposits may be seat by postal order, Wells, Fargo 4 Co., or Exchange 
on City Banks. When opening accounts send signature. 

San Francisco Savings Union. 

Corner California and Webb Streets. 

Deposits. Dec. 31, 1896 ia» .SB 327 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus . . . 1,575,631 
ALBERT MILLER, President I E B POND, Vice-President 
DiRECTOPS-Thomas Magee, G. W. Beaver, Philip Barth, Daniel E. Mar- 
White Cashf'r Fremer ^ George C. Boardman, Robert Watt; Lovell 
Receives Deposits, and Loans only on real estate security. Country 
JS?.i«. a 1ff s JSf y .»<> sent by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by oheck of reliable 
parties, payable in San Francisco, but the responsibility of this Savings 
n, ,i,„ „™J5? CeS ;?'"?'., wUh the aotual recel P t 0I ""> "oneY The signature 
£«. ^K? ,tor , ! "'ould accompany the first deposit. No charge is made tor 
Fnga"?Slto8 "° Ce hours-9. a. u. to 8 p. u. Saturday even- 

Swiss American Bank or locarno, Switzerland, and 
California Mortgage & Savings Bank, s ',k"t on s BO F merj 

Paid up Capital and Reserves, W20 000. 
.« ■Sfn' s,lviD es »nd commercial banking business transacted. Inter- 
;"coSli.rV!il , pYp%i ePO,IU - L °'"' SOn " PPr0Ve<1 real «"«• ««»»*. "d 

F D C^pil 01 v S T^ r „ nSt ,^ I ^ ni L ke ' A ' SoarDoro JC Rued ' E - Martinonl. 
I C blebe, A. TogDazzlnt. H Brunner, McD R Vennble A G Wlelnmi 
F. Kronenberg. Charles Mart in . C. Ge hret. P. Tognazz^nl S G?andi ' 

Crocker- Woolworth NationaFBank of S. F. 

Corner Market, Montgomery, 

and Post Streets. 

Pald-Up Capital 11,000.000 

WM. H.CROCKER . ih».m.,. 

W. E. BROWN vii'.'S \, . 

GEO. W.KLINE Vice-President 

„ _ Cashier 

DiRECTORs-Henry T. Scott, E B. Pond, Hy J.Crocker, Geo. W. Scoti. 







Java : the Card en of the East ; by Eliza Kuhsniah Scidmore. wilh 38 
illustrations and indix. Published by The Century Co., l."l>7 

Those who have read Miss Scidmore's "Journeys in 
Alaska" or her "Jinrikisha Days in Japan" know that she 
is a bright, obseivant, and enthusiastic traveler, who puts 
down her impressions of new lands and peoples in a vigorous 
and interesting manner. Her book on South-eastern 
Alaska, though published more than a dozen years ago, 
remains the best handbook for the tourist's use to-day. 
In Java Miss Scidmore found an excellent subject, on 
which few books in the English language exist. For five 
years (1811-18K;) Java was under British rule, but in the 
latter year the island was restored to its former masters, 
the Dutch, who retained the excellent British police and 
judicial systems, but resumed the old land-system. 
To encourage the cultivation of the sugar-cane, 
advances were made to colonists willing to erect 
sugar-mills and the natives were obliged to place 
one-fifth of their lands with cane. This "culture-system" 
was extended toother crops, and has worked well: Java, 
with an area of less than fifty thousand square miles, 
supports a population of twenty-four millions. Turning 
to lighter matters, Miss Scidmore comments vivaciously 
on the peculiar deshabille of sarong (narrow skirt) and 
dressing-jacket, without stockings, worn by the Dutch 
women uutil dinner-time, and on the splendor of the pros- 
perous Chinaman, in spotless white duck, with patent- 
leather shoes and silk hat. From unhealthy, sweltering, 
low-lying Batavia Miss Scidmore journeyed by rail across 
the island almost to its eastern end, stopping at several 
towns en route. She was much struck with the beauty of 
the roads bordered and over-arched by lovely trees, and 
with the wonderful variety and lavish abundance of the 
fruits of that tropical paradise. She never tires t f ex- 
pressing her delight at the beauty of the views of coffee 
and tea plantations, rice-fields, groves of palms and forests 
of splendid trees. Nor is natural loveliness all that Java 
has to show: in the interior are the ruins of temples of 
colossal size and extent, adorned with statues, cartings, 
and bas-reliefs of a bewilderingly elaborate kind. But, 
interesting as these temples are to the areba>o!ogical 
specialist, and gloriously picturesque and impressive as 
they are to the spectator, the description of them is 
necessarily so full of minute details and unfamiliar names 
that it is apt to grow a little tedious. The most remark- 
able of these vast ruins are at Brambanam, of which Cap- 
tain Baker, a British military officer, writes: "In the 
whole course of my life I have never met with such stu- 
pendous and finished specimens of human labor and of the 
science and taste of ages long since forgot, as in this 
little spot." Many excellent reproductions of photographs 
of the temples, and of the wall-sculptures and statues with 
which they are embellished, accompany Miss Scidmore's 
description. At Djokjakarta she was received by Prince 
Pakoe Alam, and witnessed a performance of the national 
puppet show and a lyric drama, at which the leading 
members of Djokja Society, European, Javanese, and 
Chinese, were present in their handsomest clothes. Miss 
Scidmore amusingly recounts the loss, one by one, of ber 
deepiy-cherished illusions about the tropics: she saw no 
monstrous serpents, no fierce tigers, could not get a de- 
cent cup of coffee, or find the valley of the deadly upas- 
tree. But she thoroughly enjoyed her trip, and, the 
longer she stayed, the more she appreciated ihe loveliness 
and fertility of Java, and the charm of manner of the 
Javanese. She complains, however, of the restrictions im- 
posed upon tourists by the Dutch government, and of the 
somewhat unsatisfactory food furnished by the hotels. On 
the railways there is a well-organized system of lunch- 
baskets. Miss Scidmore's volume is perhaps a little over- 
laden with detail, but it contains much information not 
easily found elsewhere, and communicated in the lively and 
agreeable style of a practised writer of books and articles 
of travel. 



January 29, 1898. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



'5 



Speaking of Cambridge, Mass. , Miss J. L. Gilder says : 
" It has a peculiarity . . . possessed by do other American 
town: wealth is not the one and only qualification for 
social success in Cambridge. There a man is esteemed for 
his own sake and not for the sake of his bank-account. 
There may be other towns in America where personal 
worth counts for something, but they are few and far be- 
tween. I have in mind one place in particular where they 
as much as tell you that it is your money and not yourself 
that they want. Money is the god of America's idolatry, 
and it is for this reason that professional people find living 
abroad so much more attractive than living at home." 
Yet even in the United States there are two classes of 
professional men who, though poor, have an excellent 
social position, viz.: TJ. S. military and naval officers. But 
these are so few that they do not affect the truth of the 
general statement that money is the universal standard. 

It was recently stated in these columns, on the authority 
of The Critic (which obtained the statement from an Eng- 
lish paper), that Mr. E. Hichens, the author of "The Green 
Carnation" and of "Flames," was the associate editor of 
Literature, the new literary weekly, of which the editor 
is Mr. H. J). Traill. The managerof Literature now pro- 
tests that " he is absolutely unaware of Mr. Hichens' ex- 
istence, has never read "The Green Carnation" or 
" Flames," has never to his knowledge met the author of 
these books or any person of the name of Hichens, and 
has never received any letter or application for employ- 
ment from any one of the name." 

" The Sinner, " by "Rita," has been issued by Rand, 
MciNally & Co., the well-known Chicago publishers. It is 
a narrative of the life and adventures of Deborah Gray, a 
nurse in a large London hospital, and seems to be full of 
incident. 

Mr. A. E. Keet, formerly editor of The Forum, has be- 
come the manager, in the United States, of the Pall Mall 
Magazine. 



As every dog has his day, so every publisher has his 
periodical. The Macmillan Company issues "Book Re- 
views," the Scribners have "The Book-Buyer," Dodd, 
Mead & Co. "The Bookman," andMessrs. G. P. Putnam's 
Sons "Notes on New Books. " One of the most interest- 
ing of these is the "The Book-Buyer," the January issue 
of which opens with an article by the Right Hon. James 
Bryce on Bishop Potter's recently published book entitled 
"The Scholar and the State " More than two pages are 
devoted to a picture and a description of the Stevenson 
fountain in Portsmouth Square— a favorite haunt of Stev- 
enson, where he picked up strange acquaintances of many 
tongues and hues. There are good portraits of Messrs. 
James Bryce, F. Marion Crawford, C. F. Lummis, and 
others. The last seems by much wandering among Span- 
ish-speaking people to have acquired a somewhat Spanish 
type of features. Under the heading of "looking Back- 
ward" Stanley Waterloo's "The Story of Ab," which was 
recently reviewed in these columns, is contrasted very 
favorably with Mrs. F. E. Wait's tale of prehistoric man, 
" Yermah the Dorado," which is justly said to be "intelli- 
gible only in spots." 

Gentlemen given to the noble art of oratory should take 
warning by the prospectus of The Bookman, which fur- 
nishes a good example of the mixed metaphors into which 
the popular speaker so readily falls. In its announcement 
for 1898 we read: "No intelligent American absorbed in 
the current of human affairs . . . can afford to neg- 
lect the literature of his day. Yet ... so immense 
is the yearly output of literature, that the reader, though 
desirous of keeping abreast of the stream, finds himself 
bewildered without a pilot to guide him through the sea 
of printer's ink. Just such a guide The Bookman aims at 
being." Here our "intelligent American" is first repre- 
sented as swept along by a strong current, then as a 
swimmer trying to make headway against a rapid stream, 
and lastly as a sailor who has lost his reckoning at sea, 
and has no pilot to guide his vessel. "The literature of 
his day" is spoken of first as an article of merchandise, of 
which a vast quantity is manufactured, then as a strong 
str<am, and lastly as a "sea of ink." The Bcokman, what- 
ever else it may be, scarcely seems to be a guide to the 
use of good English, if we may judge from this sp5cimen. 




< Mixture 

I Smokinq Tobacco ## 



BANKING. 



The Anglo- Galifomian Bank, Limited. 

Capital authorized 16,000,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 

Paid Up l,5UO,OU0 

Reserve Fund 700,000 

N. E. Cob. Fine and Sansome Sts 
Head Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Seligman & Co., 21 Broad street. 
The Bank transaots a General Banking Business, sells drafts, makes 
telegraphic transfers, and issues letters of oredlt available throughout the 
world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 
and bullion. IGN. STElNHART t Mana „ era 
P. N. LILIENTB.AL f Managers 

The German Savings and Loan Society. 

No. 526 California Street, San Francisco 

Guarantee capital and surplus $2,109,000 99 

Capital actually paid up in cash. . 1,000 000 00 
Deposits December 31, 1897 26,t69,633 36 

OFFICERS: President, B.A.Becker; First Vice-President, Daniel 
Meyer; Second Vice-President, H. Horstman; Cashier, A. H. R Schmidt; 
Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann; Secretary, George Tourny ; Assist- 
ant Secretary, A. H. Muller; Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS: B A. Becker, Daniel Meyer. H. Horst- 
mann, Ign. Stelnhart, N. Van Bergen, E. Rohte, H. B. Russ, D. N. 
Walter and N. Ohlandt. 

Wells Fargo & Go.'s Bank. 

N. E. Corner Sansome & Sutter Streets 

John J. Valentine President 

Homer S. King Manager 

H. Wads worth Cashier 

F. L. Llpman Assistant Cashier 

Cash Capital and Surplus 16,250,000 

BRANCHES. 

N. Y. City.H. B. Parsons, Cashier. | Salt Lake City. J. E. Dooly, Cashier 

Portland, Or.. R. M. Dooly, Cashier 

Directors— John J. Valentine, Benj. P. Cheney, Oliver Eldrldge, Henry 

E. Huntington, Homer S. King, George B. Gray, John J. McCook, John 

Bermingham, Dudley Evans. 

London, Paris and American Bank, Limited. 

N.W. Cor. Sansome & Sutter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital 12,500,000 

Paid Up Capital .|2,000,ouo 

Reserve Fund I 850,000 

Head Office 40 Threadneedle Street, London, E. C. 

AGENTS — New York— Agency of the London, Paris, and American 
Bank Limited, No. 10 Wall Street, N. Y. Paris— Messrs. Lazard, Freres 
& Cie, 17 Boulevard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the 
world. Commercial and Travelers' Credits issued. 

§ IG AL G T R S E C^i BAPM }"->°^"- 

Security Savings Bank. 

222 Montgomery St.. Mills Building. 
INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. 
LOANS MADE. 

DIRECTOBS. 

William Alvord S. L. Abbot Jr. E.H.Hewlett 

Wm. Babcock O. D. Baldwin E. J. McCutchen 

Adam Grant W.S.Jones R. H. Pease 

HUMBOLDT SAVINGS ftND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 18 Geary Street. 

Directors: Adolph C. Weber, President; W. J. Lowry, Vice-Presi- 
dent; Ernest Brand, Secretary; W. S. Keyes; I. Kohn; G. H Luchsinger; 
C. E Hatch, Attorney. 






Offioe of the President. 



Hxpttsa and Banging. 

Saw eFra-wctsco, 2)ece»n6ei 31, 1897. 



w oar Annual Report of Precious Metals produced in the States and Territories west of the 
: Columbia)durin^ 1897, which sliows in theaggregate. OV'l. $69,830,597; Silver, $37, : 
1, $9, 775, 14) - ; result, $ 153, 435, 469. The " value at which the several 

J 1 cts. per lb ; and Lead, $3 38 per cwt. 

-.wance mu- ' nations from reported figures, by reason of constantly increasing 

■ and base metals from the mines outside of the Express and the difficulty of getting 

le data from private sources. Estimates obtained iu this way are liable to be exaggerated and are, to a 

• but with some modifications on this account, made herein, the general results reach e d, 

nay be accepted as the closest approximation possible under the circumstances, 



".TATHS ANK TKKI' 



Cold liust sod Bui 
lion by / 



California 



Alaska 
Idaho 

-1 ... 

Arizona 



Texas 

British Columbia and North West Territory. 



Total ... $55/ 



and 



■■ --.-: ButtlOSl 
by Express. 



i,59 



2,7? 

4,4 r . 

''•554 
'.555.873 

27,5'* 
o,tJi 



fc,o75,'93 

1, 34', 374 

'",725 

200)000 

3,57 



864,813 

120,000 

I,837,"8 



|I4,02I,223 



$ 12.948 
451.453 

4,555.000 
9,452,000 
813,748 
12,869,783 
I53,34» 
143,693 
■i-i'. '/), 
309.717 

31,000 
3,150,000 



$32,278,290 



Ores and Base 

Bullion by Freight. 



$1 



I9S 9»7 

2J4 053 
11.900 

26,l60 
52,000 

741,000 

J25JO0 

770 WO 

780, ;'/2 
[9V000 

69V-21 

s&OOO 

2,500 

257/", 



$18,830,824 

3,3"7,845 

2,461,697 

568,109 

3.6? 
10,021,600 
40,227,500 

9247,442 
34,9/6,829 

",235,505 

6,085,575 

3'6,5'7 

OI.OOO 
I'/, 582,000 



$51,326,5«2 $153,435,469 



The gross yield for 1897, shown above, segregated, is approximately as follows : 

•V, $69,830,597 

....24,* 4 y 37,184,034 

' • 36,645,694 

- 6fVs 9,775,144 

' r "Ul . . $153,435,469 






Z£F 



Th ' >' SlSll herein Irestrd of, Is the greatest in the history of the Country, that of sold, W«vxS77, 

being abov. an ,,1, and the world - * output of gold for 1897— approximately $240,000,000— is surprisingly large and 

per ceul gr^airr iK:,., r.timated by me aix months ago. The most notable increases have been in the British Possessions of the 

1 M.l«, 



1 ' Au.iralaan, .iled states of America and 

coma, aii.ves uu 00LB rx thx statcs astd txsjutouzs west of th* msaocai arvza, 1870-1807. 










$ 54,"- 

58, y 

62, 2 

72,2 

74,1 

75,173 
?8,42i,754 
81,154,622 
75, 

84,'. 
92,411,835 

127," 
118, 1' 

120,.' 

'53.1 



Product after 
deducting amount. 

Columbia and Writ 
Coait 0/ Mt ■ 



The Net Products of the State* and Territories west of the Missouri River, excln 
aire of British Columbis and Weal Coast of Mexico, divided, are sa follows: 



$ 52,'" 
55.7 

• 1 .824 
7". 
71,01 

87,2 

72,088,888 
77.232,512 
81,19.8,474 
89,2 

,9,212 

87,31 

'V).222 
IOJ,3 

112,665,569 
126,7 
126,)v 
117,94 
ill.:' 

1 17.J- 



from 

at $4.8665. 



• 1 during the 
San 1'rancisco, $11,156, 



LEAD. 


COPPER- 


SILVER. 


!.D. 






$17,320,000 
19,286,000 
19,924,429 
27,483,302 

29,699,122 

31,635,239 
39.292.924 
45.846,109 
37.248,137 
37,032,857 
38,033,055 


$33,750,000 
34,398,000 
38,177,395 
30,206,558 
38,466^88 
.1,194 
42,886.935 
44,880,223 
37.576,030 
31,470,262 
32,559.067 






2,250,000 






















3,452,000 
4.185,769 
5.742,390 






$ *9 


6,361,902 


M9S 


42.987,613 


30,653.959 


.'55 


".037 


48,133,039 


'.3l8 


,55o 


5,683,921 


42,975.101 


27,816,640 


1 091 


',252 


43.529.925 


25.183.567 


2.991 


7,8V 


44,516,599 


26,393,756 


5,192 


9.270,755 


52,136,851 


29,561 ,424 


."73 


10,362,746 


50,833.884 


32,500,067 


11,263,630 


18,2', 1 


53 152 747 




'4,593.323 


...763 


64.808,637 


32,527,661 


■>5T 


69,092 


62,930,831 


3'. 795.361 


12,!'- 


■3,2' 




3', 685, 118 








29,847,444 




23,631,339 


1.521 


33,948,723 


8.223,513 


22,276,294 


28,72 


45,623,291 


7.17' 


-'■"5 


35,274,777 


48.399,729 




28,71 


33,684.963 


-.242 


.,144 


36,388.694 


'.4.o',l ',-,1 


63 6SS.S97 



past year to ua the Straits, etc.. have been as follows : Prom London 

202. Total, $48,412,039. as against $44,102,381 last year. Pounds Sterling estimated 



a. f w i 



^iX 1 1 i l"e b § \'a \'c y o i 911 c ocico . 

STATBMENT OF THE PRODUCT OF COLD AND SILVER IN THF. KEPDHUC OF MEXICO, REVISED AND CORRECTED FROM 1 877 to 1897 

VALUES UPON MINTAGE DASIS. 



COLIJ. 



SILVER. 



1877-I878. 
I878-1S79. 
1879-I8SO. 
l8SO-lSSl. 
I88I-IS82. 
I8S2-1883. 
1883-1S84. 
I884-ISS5. 
1885-I886. 
18S6-1S87. 
I887-I888. 
18S8-I889. 
1889-I89O. 
I89O-I89I. 
189I-I892. 
I892-I893. 
1893-1894. 
I894-I895 . 
I895-I896. 
I896-I897. 

Total. 



$ 7. 



47,000 
S8 1,000 
942,000 
,013,000 
937,000 
956,000 
,055,000 
914,000 
,026,000 
,047,000 
,031,000 
,040,000 
,100,000 
,150,000 
,275,000 
,400,000 
,425,000 
,750,000 
,475,000 
,500,000 



$36,664,000 



124,837.000 
25,125,000 
26,Soo,ooo 
29,234,000 
29,329,000 
29,569,000 

31,695,000 

33,226,000 
34,112,000 
34,600,000 
34,912,000 
40,706,000 
41,500,000 
43,000,000 
45,75o,ooo 
48,500,000 
47,250,000 
54,225,000 
54,450,000 
60,683,000 



$"69,503,000 



$25,581,000 
26,006,000 
27,742,000 
30,247,000 
30,266,000 
30,525,000 
32,750,000 
34,140,000 
35,138,000 
35,647,000 
35,943,000 
41,746,000 
42,600,000 
44, 150,000 
47,025,000 
49,900,000 
48,675,000 
58,975,(00 
59,925,000 
69,183,000 



$So6, 167,000 



EXHIBIT OF COINAGE OF GOLD, SILVER AND COPPER, IN THE REPUBLIC OF MEXICO, FROM THE 1st OF JULY, 1873, to THB 

30th of June, 1897. 



1873-1874.. 

1874-1875.. 
1875-1876. . 
1876-1877 . . 
1877-1878.. 
1878-1879. . 
1879-1880. . 
1880-1881 . 
1881-1882. . 
1882-1883.. 
1883-1884.. 
1884-1885.. 
1885-1886. . 
1886-1887.. 
1887-1888.. 
1888-1889.. 
1889-1890. . 
1890-1891 . . 
1891-1892 . . 
1892-1893 . . 
1893-1894. . 
1 894-1895.. 
1895-1896 . . 
1896-1897.. 



Total. 



Gold Dollars. 



Silver 1 ollars. 



$866,743 
862,619 
809,401 
695,750 
691,998 
658,206 
521,826 
492,068 

452,59° 
407,600 
328,698 
423,250 
425,000 
410,000 
340.320 
305, '<-o 
243,298 
308,000 
291,940 
361,672 
553,9', 8 
545,237 
565,786 
453,474 



$12,014,554 



$iS,S46,o67 
19,386,958 
19,454.054 
21,415,128 
22,084,203 
22,162,987 
24,018,528 

24,617,395 
25,146,260 
24,083,921 

25,377,379 
25,840,728 
25,850,000 
25,600,000 
26,711,000 
25,274,500 
24,328,326 
24,238,000 
25,527,000 
27,169,876 
30,185,611 
27,628,981 
22,634,788 
19,296,009 



$576,877,699 



Copter [> li.ahs. 



fl5,g66 
21,712 
30.654 
9,035 
4L364 
16,300 
14,035 
42,258 
i 1,972 



$203,296 



Summary. — Totals: Gold, $12,014,554 ; Silver, $576,877,699 ; Copper, $203,296. Grand total, $589,095,549 

EXHIBIT OF THE COINAGE OF MEXICO FROM THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE MINTS IN 1537 TO THIS KND OF THE 

FISCAL YEAR OF 1S97. 



Colonial Epoch. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


COPl'EK. 


Total. 




$ 8,497,950 
19,889,014 
40,391,447 


$752,067,456 
441,629.211 
888,563,989 


$200,000 
342,893 


$760,765,406 




461,518,225 
929,298,329 






INDEPENDENCE. 


$68,778,411 


$2,082,260,656 


$542,893 


$2,151,581,960 




$ 557,392 
. 45,040,628 


$ 18,575,569 
740,246,485 




$ 19,132,961 
790,522,290 




$5,235,177 


REPUBLIC. 


$45,598,020 


$758,822,054 


$5,235,177 


$809,655,251 


Eagle coin, from 1st July, 1873, to 30th of June, 1897 


$12,014,554 


$576,S77.699 


$203,296 


$5S9,095.549 



SUMMARY. 
Colonial Epoch — from 1537 to 1821, $2,151,581,960; Independence — from 1S22 to 1S73, $809,655,251 ; Republic— from 
1873 to 1897, $589,095,549. Total, $3,550,332>76o. 




/S^4^^*cO 



President. 



i8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 29, 1898. 



THE GLAUS SPREGKELS BUILDING 



THE acquirement of great wealth is often attained by 
its possessor without resulting in the benefit of that 
community in which it is amassed or the material develop- 
ment of the State; and the possession of large fortune is 
often of very little value to those who secure it or to the 
people among whom it is gained. Carrying with its pos- 
session immense responsibility, the power of immeasurable 
good and the betterment of society, it becomes a trust 
whose wise uses are among the highest privileges that 
can be enjoyed. 

Among the men on the Pacific Coast whose energy, 
brains and forethought have amassed great fortunes, the 
same of Claus Spreckels, by right of lasting and beneficial 
results to the State and people, stands in first place. He 
has invested and expended his large means in a manner 
that means the employment of labor, the development of 
material resources, and the addition of permanent wealth 
and increasing stimulus to a most important industry. 

The building of the Valley railroad, which will add many 
millions to the assessable values of the State, stimulate de- 
velopment and afford transportation to a large district of 
country, is due to the prompt and decisive action of Mr. 




SIB CLAUS SPRECKELS. 

Spreckels. Without his faith in the enterprise, and his 
practical support, the Valley railroad would to-dav have 
an existence only on paper. 

Mr. Spreckels is best known, at home and abroad, as a 
manufacturer of sugar. To him California owes the firm 
establishment on its soil of this great and growing indus- 
try. By this means millions of dollars have been saved to 
the State, profitable employment provided for an army of 
men, and happy, prosperous homes built up. The beet 
sugar industry in California is in its sturdy infancy. Mr. 
Spreckels has pioneered the way in this practically in- 
exhaustible field. He has built factories, advanced money 
to the farmers, provided them with land, and in every 
way given them practical encouragement in beet growing. 
The success that has attended the inauguration of this in- 
dustry has stimulated other capitalists; and in different 
parts of the State great factories are going up; wild and 
hitherto useless lands are being brought into cultivation, 
labor is finding profitable employment, and a vast occupa- 
tion, capable of almost limitless expansion, is assured. 

This really splendid achievement, which means through 
all future time increasing wealth, larger employment and 
greater general prosperity to the State of California and 
its people, is solely due to Claus Spreckels. He first 
demonstrated the adaptability of California soil to sugar- 
beet culture, expended his monev freelv in support of bis 



The Patent Brick Co. 

piration of the patent, 
place in the markets 



own faith, and proved the wisdom of his judgment. The 
credit for the founding and up-building of this vast and 
prosperous industry in this State belongs to Mr. Spreckels. 

His money has gone into real estate and artistic im- 
provements in San Francisco, where in recent years he 
has expended large sums in improving and erecting income 
property. The splendid Claus Spreckels building, on the 
corner of Market and Third streets, is the latest illustra- 
tion of his public spirit. This magnificent business struc- 
ture will stand for all time as a monument to his enter- 
prise — an ornament to the city, and an evidence of that 
excellent judgment that has characterized his invest- 
ments, which the people of this State have perpetual rea- 
son to regard as a means of their own prosperity. 

A handsome half-tone of this magnificent business build- 
ing, of which Reid Brothers were the architects, appears 
in this issue of the News Letter, and below will be found 
the names of many of the firms whose skill and labor con- 
tributed to the completion of the structure. 

This company was organized in 
1^75. and held the patents on the 
patent kilns up to the time of ex- 
Their brick has taken a leading 
because of its hardness, which 
means durability, with little waste in handling or in trans- 
portation. The company furnished the brick for the Mills 
Building, New City Hall, St. Ignatius College on Van Ness 
avenue, the Academy of Sciences, the Chronicle and Call 
Buildings, the Spring Valley Water Company's Building, 
corner of Stockton and Geary streets; also the San Fran- 
cisco Gas and Electric Building on Post street. The com- 
pany has invested in their works some $250,000, with a 
capacity of fifty million brick per annum. The office of 
the company is at 240 Montgomery street; President, 
Philip Caduc. 

The splendid and highly orna- 

The Thomas Day Co mental electroliers in use in the 
building were furnished by the 
Thomas Day Company, of 725 Mission street. This firm, 
which is the largest of its kind in the United States, as it 
is one of the most complete in all its appointments, turns 
out only the finest quality of work. All kinds of gas and 
electric fixtures, designs in bronze, brass, and fine metal 
work are done here, and electro-plating is treated as a 
fine art. The latest and most artistic furnishings and 
fixtures for private residences and public buildings are 
made by the firm, whose standard of excellence is recog- 
nized throughout the Coast. A large number of men are 
constantly employed by the firm, and a great and pros- 
pering business has been built up which is a benefit and 
credit to the city. 

This firm furnished all the hol- 

Gladding, MoBean <t Co. low fire tile proofing used in 
walls of the great building; 
and the beautiful dome of the structure is composed of 
terra cotta filled in between the steel ribs of the struc- 
ture's crown. The works of this firm are at Lincoln and 
Vallejo, Cal., and the tiling, terra cotta, etc., turned out 
are of very superior quality. This material is made in all 
colors, and is of a most durable and excellent quality. 
Gladding, McBean & Co. employ only the most expert and 
skillful labor, and the work done by the firm is always 
first-class in every respect. Their office is at 1358 Mar- 
ket street. 

The contract for the stone work 

McGMvray Stone Co. on this building was let to the 
McGilvray Stone Company, of 
which Mr. John D. McGilvray is the President. This most 
difficult part of the contract was executed with eminent 
satisfaction. The beautiful appearance of the exterior of 
the Spreckels Building is largely due to the finished char- 
acter of this contract. The company's works are located 
on King street, between Second and Third. 

The foundations of this splendid struc- 

Gray Brothers, ture were laid by the firm of Gray 
Brothers, the well-known artificial stone 
paving and concrete contractors, whose offices are at 316 
Montgomery street. The foundations of the Spreckels 
Building were subjected to the most rigid scrutiny, and met 
every requirement. The firm is noted for the promptness 
and care with which every contract, small or large, is 
executed. 



Januar\ 29, 1898. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



19 



To this firm was given the contract 
Peacock <t Butoher. for the immeuse smokestack ami 
the ample power house, and the 
substantial manner in which the work was done attest the 
reliable quality of their workmanship. The firm have per- 
formed many lareo contracts here, among them being the 
Lane Hospital, the power house of the Mission-street Rail- 
way, power house of the Edison Electric Light Company on 
Stevenson street, being among their larger contracts. 
Mail box. Builders' Exchange, 4I> New Montgomery street. 
The California Art Glass Bending 
California Art Glass, and Cutting Works, at 103-105 Mis- 
sion street, manufactured the glass 
for the two handsome lamps over the portico, and the bev- 
eled, bent, and crystallized glass in the building are the 
artistic product of this firm; as also are the fine embossed 
plate glass screens in the business office of the Call. The 
Works are manufacturers of memorial windows; fine art 
glass windows for private residences are specialties, and 
a large business is done by the firm throughout the Coast 
and abroad. 

The handsome fittings, furniture, and 
Fink & Schindler. finish of the business office of the 
Morning Call, in the Spreckels Build- 
ing, were made by the well-known firm of Pink & Schindler, 
of 1309-15 Market street. The skill of this firm, which 
employs only the best mechanics, has been displayed in 
the interior of numerous fine residences, bauks and offices 
throughout the city. 

In preparing the foundations for 
J. S. Stratton & Son the building the work was in 
charge of J. S. Stratton & Son, 
who are the oldest contractors in house-raising and moving 
in the city. This is the largest contract of this kind let for 
the year, and was executed most satisfactorily. Their 
office is at 40 New Montgomery street. 





I 

1$, 


'if-- 

■ 


; 


5 








1 -'^f* tv "" Mo@t!s«?P ! '- 

- 



The above illustration shows the hand- 
Thomas Lundy. some interior of the jewelry store of 
Thomas Lundy, which occupies the 
ground floor of the Spreckels Building, facing Third street. 
The Palace Hardware Company, 
Palace Hardware Co. at 603 Market street, furnished 
the hardware for the building, 
and the artistic design and high quality of the appoint- 
ments show that the company enjoys every facility for fill- 
ing all contracts for high-class goods. 

The steam heating in this great 
W. W. Montague & Co building was put in by W. W. 
Montague & Co., whose place 
of business is at 309-317 Market street. 



Gas Consumers Association, 316 Post street. Reduces gas bills 
from twenty to forty per cent. Electric meters tested. 

Huber's Del Monte Orchestra furnishes the best music for an en- 
tertainment. Telephone: Care Ben]. Curtaz, Main 1247. 



Nature makes the cures 
after all. 

Now and then she gets 
into a tight place and needs 
helping out. 

Things get started in the 
wrong direction. 

Something is needed to 
check disease and start the 
system in the right direction 
toward health. 

Scott's Emulsion of Cod- 
liver Oil with hypophos- 
phites can do just this. 

It strengthens the nerves, 
feeds famished tissues, and 
makes rich blood. 

50c. and $1.00 ; all druggists. 
SCOTT & BOWNE, Chemists, New York. 



DR. BYRON W. HAINES 



14 Grant Avenue 
Rooms 16-17-18-19 



Dentist 



Dr. FRANK C. 



PAGUE, 
Dentist 



Has removed Ms office to the Spring Valley Water Works Building, Geary 
and Stockton streets, southeast corner, S. F. Rooms 3, 5, and 7. 

Some papers give allthe 
news part of the time, 
and some papers give 
part of the news all of 
1 the time '■• >■ >■ x :< 




The Qall 



. Is. tKfi.jOnly, paper that gives 



ALL THE NEWS ftLL THE TIME 

SUBSCRIPTION PRIGE-lncluding Postage: 

Daily Call (incl'd'g Sunday) 12 mos..$6.00 I Sunday Call. . 12 mos.. 11.50 i 
6 " 8.(10 I Weekly Call..)2 " 1.50 , 
3 " 1.50 1 " '• 6 " 75 

1 " 6 > Sunday and 

Delivered by carrier every day, 65 cts. | Weekly Call 12 " 2.50 , 




JOHN D. SPRECKELS 




FlMEstationery.steeland oopper-plate engraving. 
Market street . San Francisco . 



Cooper & Co., 746 



DR. cj. NICHOLS, 

(Formerly County Physician of Amador County.) 

Office: xl Powell street, cornei Powell and Ellis. Residence, 

Baldwin Hotel, S. P . Hours : 1 to 4 p. m. ; 7 to 8 p. m. 

dOHN E. RICHARDS, Law Offices, 

Removed from Crocker Building to 404-405 406 Claus Spreckels Bldg. 
Telephone Main 5415. San Francisco. 

The HOTEL RICHELIEU, SJS^S^E: 

Principal and finest family hotel of San Francisco. 

Motel Richelieu Go. 

THE OPIUM AND MORPHINE HABIT. 

" What 'We May Do to be Saved" is a little book, 
giving full particulars of a reliable cure. Free. 
l*i . J. L. Stephens, Dept. B., Lebanon, Ohio. 



SAX FRAXCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 29, 1898. 




d@gte.0-o. 



SUCH a jovial temperament as that possessed by the late 
Alexander T. Badlam. whodiedon Wednesday night, is 
espeeiallv rare in a man of his years. His humor was 
spontaneous and unfailing, and bis high spirits were so in- 
fectious that everyone was glad to meet bim. 

He was easily the most industrious practical joker in 
town and his skill as an amateur prestidigitator made him 
the wonder and fear of his acquaintances. He would 
deftlv extract pins from cravats, watches and chains. 
restoring them to their surprised owners with great 
eclat. 

A favorite trick was to seize a friend by the button of 
his coat, and while telling him a funny story, to unob- 
trusively cut off the button with his knife. Bad 
former partner and always his close friend was Fulton G. 
Berry of Fresno. 

After Berry had been despoiled of several buttons, he 
procured, at great trouble and some expense, a button on 
the under side of which was a tiny needle, so arranged as 
to pop out whenever the button was touched. Berry had 
this contrivance sewed on his coat, and after wearing the 
bait for some time. Badlam seized the button, and the 
little needle jabbed the joker in the hand. Badlam was 
well pricked. He never again attempted a practical joke 
at Berry's expense. 

Mr. Badlam was a devotee of the straw hat. which he 
wore in season and out of season. It was no extraordinary 
occurrence, on the coldest day of winter, for the old gentle- 
man to d -ive about in a big overcoat and a very small 
straw hat. Once Colonel Andrews, who always dresses 
by the fashion plate, remonstrated with his friend upon 
his peculiar headgear. 

■• Have to do it." explained Badlam. "Keeps my head 
cool!" he added. — he was perfectly bald. 

As a politician, Badlam was a pronounced success, mak- 
ing such a rattling canvass, that bis opponents had no 
chance. His slogan was: 

"Its a cold day when I get left! ' 

For a long time he did not get left, but as Sir John 
Macdonald. the veteran Premier of Canada, used to say: 

"There's nothing so uncertain as an election, except a 
horse race." 

So one time. Badlam's luck changed, and the other 
fellow won. On the day after the election, when he arose, 
the practical joker found that some appreciative friends 
had, during the night, deposited a load of ice on his door 
steps. 

# » » 

Urged on to vengeance by Dr. David Starr Jordan, the 
unjustly accused Professor W. R. Dudley of Leland Stan- 
ford Junior University, proposes to get even with his 
bucolic accusers in one way or another. His experience 
was a remarkable illustration of the ignorance as well as 
"the insolence of office. ' He was furiously angry that, 
while near to nature's heart and while laudably engaged 
in the perfection of his knowledge as a scientific botanist, 
he should be arrested by the dusty minded Dogberrys of 
1 Cruz and actually lodged in jail on the charge of 
being one of the most dangerous counterfeiters in the 
country' 

While the peaceful and law abiding scientist was at first 
very wroth, now "grim-visaged war hath smoothed his 
wrinkled front" and the professor proposes taking an 
original but justifiable method of revenge. 

"The Santa Cruz Dogberry and Verges having accused 
me of shoring the queer. " says Professor Dudley. "I now 
propose, in the interest of science, shoving my botanizing 
trowel into their heads, which are certainly soft enough 
to make it possible for my trowel to do its duty. When I 
discover what kind of moss grows inside their skulls I will 
write a paper!" 

* • * 

The sarcastic tongue of Senator R. B. Carpenter has 
won for its owner fame and some dislike, even beyond the 
confines of California, for while sarcasm occasionallv adds 



to the gaiety of nations, it rarely increases the happiness 
of him against whom it is directed. One of the character- 
istics of the attorney and politician is his extreme con- 
servatism, and his pessimism concerning the tendencies of 
the present age. 

The Senator was the occupant of one roomy leather chair 
in the elegantly-appointed smoking room of the Palace 
Hotel. Attorney-General Fitzgerald sat in another, and 
Morris Estee made it a trio. The three old cronies were 
smoking, and Estee was talking. He grew enthusiastic 
over his favorite theme — the march of intellect. The At- 
torney-General listened in sympathetic silence, but Mr. 
Carpenter, rolling his eyes sideways, lifted up his voice in 
sarcastic approval. 

"Oh, yes," said the Senator. "The march of intellect 
has certainly become exceedingly rapid of late. It has 

marched out of fight .'" 

* * * 

Everybody knows Colonel Caldwell. The colonel is a 
Virginian, of the old school. The colonel's piety has con- 
densed into one creed: courtesy to women. He never 
'eaves a room with a lady in it without backing through 
the door. Miss X.. who is very practical remarked the 
other evening: "Colonel Caldwell, have you eyes on the 
back of your head?" "I would have them madam were 
you behind me." An acquaintance the other day asked: 
"Colonel, do you always back away from the ladies?" "I 

do suh! but by G I don't back down from the men, suh." 

A lady, much given to Browning, asked the following 
question: receiving the following answer "Colonel Cald- 
well, is falling in love an evidence of reason?" "My 
dear madam." replied the Colonel, " in love we desert the 
calm of logic and surrender ourselves to the rose-tinted 
delirium of instinct." "Rose-tinted delirium of instinct" 

is out of sight. 

* * * 

Many of the stores about the city were handsomely 
•decorated in honor of the Golden Jubilee last Monday. The 
public-spirited merchants in a great measure made up for 
the poor showing in this direction by the city. Among 
others— and the most strikingly beautiful — was the White 
House, which welcomed the day and the city's guests 
right royally in a combination and wealth of colors that 
won the admiration of tens of thousands. On Kearny 
and Post streets, the face of the large building was a mass 
of harmonious colors, almost completely hiding the White 
House from view. The sight was a beautiful one, and very 
happily voiced the enthusiastic welcome of Raphael Weil A 
Company to the occasion and the visitors. 

* » * 

If ever there was an example of dire ingratitude it was 
the recent election at the Mercantile Library, when the 
two ladies who had been placed upon one of the tickets 
were defeated. Everyone knows that when the Library 
was almost in t.rtrtmis the ladies stepped to the front, and 
by unceasing effort and tireless energy brought order out 
of chaos, and materially aided in keeping the institution 
going. It is to be hoped the mistake, to put it mildly, will 
be rectified when the new election is held next month. 

* * * 

Having been held up at the point of a pistol near his 
residence in the Western Addition and relieved of all his 
valuables a few winters ago. Joe Friedlander, receiving 
teller of the Anglo-California Bank, is exceedingly wary 
of the ubiquitous footpad. As far as possible, he avoids 
pedestrianism after nightfall, although since bis former 
unpleasant experience, he has wisely been prepared to de- 
fend himself, should he ever be attacked. His second ad- 
venture occurred last week. 

The young banker had been making an evening call, and 
his homeward way being along Pine street, on which there 
are no cars, he was striding along at a good pace. The 
January night was unusuallv dark, and Joe could not help 
1 thinking that the conditions were ideal for the practice of 
the footpad's artifices. In the midst of these unpleasant 
reflections, he suddenly became conscious of the indistinct 
outlines of a form, creeping along near the houses on the 
opposite side of the street. 

That was not especially reassuring, but Friedlander has 
lots of nerve and be neither increased nor diminished his 
gait. Then a shadow crossed the street, diagonally, in 



January 29, 189S, 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



front of the teller who realized that he was in for an at- 
tack. He stood still, awaiting the approach of the man 
who, throwing off all pretense, was now coming boldly to- 
ward him. Joe waited until his antagonist was four yards 
distant. 

" Hold on, my friend." he said, coolly, pointir.g his open 
umbrella, which thus served the joint purposes of a spear 
and shield combined. "I don't need you! Don't come any 
closer!" 

Tbe footpad stopped obediently. Friedlander was sur- 
prised to see, despite the gloom, that the thug was under- 
sized and anything but formidable in appearance. 

Then came the demand. 

" Please, sir," said a piping voice to the stalwart teller. 
"Can you tell me where is the Japanese mission?" 

* * * 

A man and his wife, well known in local musical circles, 
are remarkable chiefly for the disparity in their sizes. 
They crossed the bay together on Monday morning, in 
company with countless others who wanted to see the 
Golden Jubilee parade. There was a tremendous jam 
about the ferry boats and the strapping wife utilized her 
diminutive husband as a buffer. He was a mere toy in 
her hands, and using her small lord and master as a police- 
man does his club, she pushed the people ahead of her, 
hither and thither. 

"Now, my dear," she frequently ejaculated, in shrill 
accents, which carried to the outskirts of the crowd. 
"You must take care of your wifie! I will stand a great 
deal, but I won't be abused! This crowd must stop 
shoving me!" 

The masculine Chiquita did his best, but when he finally 
landed at Market street, the musical composer looked as 
if he had been used as a battering-ram, — and so he had. 

* * * 

Tbe new pastor of the Central Methodist Church, where 
worship the largest flock of followers of the remote John 
Wesley, in this city, is most outspoken; and in his vocabu- 
lary a spade is called a spade. His name is Dr. Charles 
E. Locke, aud he is young, vigorous, and bright. 

When Dr. Locke first came to San Francisco from the 
East, by way of Portland, he was both annoyed and dis- 
tressed by the addictedness of his congregation to the un- 
pleasant habit, known in clerical circles as "the amen 
rush." Even more trying to the divine than this sudden 
bolting of the worshipers was their irreverent prepara- 
tion for escape, as the service was drawing to a close. 

The members of that church retire in a more orderly 
fashion since they were electrified by a recent announce- 
ment. 

" Those of you who do not get their coats on during the 
closing prayer," remarked the young divine, with quiet 
irony, "can do so while I pronounce the benediction." 
* # * 

Miniature painting is one of the daintiest and most beau- 
tiful expressions of art, as it is the most enduring. The 
face painted on ivor}' defies all time and retains its tint, 
expression, and tone for a century as for a day. San 
Franciscans who take an interest in Ceramic art, and value 
superior miniature work, are just now deeply interested 
in a collection that may be seen at the studio of Mr. T. W. 
Church, 307 Sansome street. The collection is the finished 
work of Mrs. Magda M. Heuerman, a distinguished minia- 
ture portrait painter of Chicago. This lady's work in- 
cludes ivory portraiture in water colors, of which she has 
seven specimens; a pastel study and a number of delft and 
porcelain paintings of different sizes. The even and excel- 
lent quality of the entire collection makes it one of great 
interest to lovers of this beautiful form of art, and stamps 
her as a master in these dainty and imperishable achieve- 
ments. It is impossible to look at this lady's work and not 
feel that she not only possesses the truest artistic tem- 
perament, but that she is perfectly able to give it per- 
petual and delightful form in all she undertakes. Three 
of the miniature portraits have been awarded first prizes 
in open competition in this country and elsewhere, notably 
at the South American exhibition of 1886, at New Orleans 
in 1885, at tbe Parthenon at Nashville, Tenn., at the 
World's Fair at Chicago. This was perhaps the most sig- 
nal endorsement of Mrs. Heuerman's work, as she secured 
five medals and diplomas. The porcelain paintings are 



ambitious pieces, and among them are reproductions 
of Rosenthal's "Vacant Chair," Thuman's "Psyche," 
Holbein's "Madonna," Rembrandt's "Breakfast," and 
Camera's " T\ rolese Innkeeper." There are three delft 
pieces, and one of these — " Minna " — was given a medal at 
the World's Fair, and found wide publication and favorable 
comment in the leading art magazines. Mrs. Heuerman 
has spent years of study abroad, and the reproductions 
are from celebrated originals in noted European salons. 
She has organized a class in miniature painting at the 
studio of Mr. Church, which will afford an excellent 
opportunity to those who desire to learn this rare art. 

A STUDY IN DEMONOLOGY. 



L-IAVING but a dollar and a quarter, how can I 
II dine ?" he muttered. " I will go to the theatre 
instead." 

On his way out between the acts, while he was thought- 
fully balancing his last quarter in his pocket, he encoun- 
tered a friend and asked him into the cafe. " If he takes 
whiskey, I shall be forced to beer," he thought. "Bah! 
how I hate the stuff." 

His friend ordered beer. 

"Whiskey," he said, and reflected that even then he 
would have to walk; home. His friend offered him a cig- 
arette, and he absent-mindedly took two. 

After the play he met the Devil around the corner. 

" You are desperate," said the Devil. 

" What of it i " he replied. 

"Nothing," said the Devil; "only, you will do as I say. 
She was in one of the boxes to-night." 

"Yes; with her father." 

"Never mind. He is now reading a telegram which 
calls him down-town. Her carriage number is 181. It 
will be called in two minutes. Ride home with her.'' 

" But the carriage is close, and I drank " . 

" Here," said the Devil,, " take a clove. Take two." 

He went back. 

The next night he met the Devil again on the same cor- 
ner. 

" She is mine," he said. " We are to be married. And 
now about the price." 

"My dear fellow," said Satan pleasantly, "don't men- 
tion it. You can pay that later — in installments." — Life. 

r 

THE death of Mrs. J. L. Flood, wife of the millionaire 
mining man, J. L. Flood, which occurred at the Cali- 
fornia Woman's Hospital on the morning of the 15th inst., 
came as a great shock to the numerous friends of that lady 
in this city. Mrs. Flood had been sick but a short time, 
and there was no thought that she was dangerously ill. 
Mrs. Flood's death takes away a lady, unassuming, kind, 
benevolent, and most courteous. She was known for her 
wide and discriminating charities, and her friends were 
numerous and devoted. Mrs. Flood's people reside in Kan- 
sas City, where she was born and reared, and where her 
parents and relatives hold a prominent place in society. 
Her sister, Miss Maud Fritz, who was visiting her at the 
time of her demise, and her husband, and Mr. N. P. Mes- 
ser, left on Sunday, the 16th, for Kansas City with the re- 
mains, at which place they will finally rest in the family 
plot. 

Tile old pioneers who are rallying to the city this week are hale 
and hearty ; nearly all of (hem splendid specimens of manhood. To a 
man, they drank Argonaut and J. F. Cutter Whiskeys in the early 
days, and the habit still clings to them. To this fact they attribute 
their rugged old age and happy declining years. E. Martin & Co., 
at 411 Market street, are sole Pacific Coast agents. 



Stiake Into Your Shoes 



Allen's Foot-Ease, a Powder for the 
feet. It cures painful, swollen, smarting feet, and instantly takes the 
sting out of corns and bunions. It's the greatest comfort discovery of the 
aee. Allen's Foot-Ease makes tight fitting or new shoes feel easy. It is 
a certain cure for sweating, callous, and hot, tired, aching feet. Try it 
to day. Sold by all druggists and shoe stores. Bv mail for2.Sc. in stamps. 
Trial package FREE. Address, Allen S. Olmsted, Le Roy. N. Y. 

has no shading; it has connective 
I iflht I inP ^hnPthanrl vowels and easy, flowing curves; it 
bill lib LlllU ulIUl blldllU is simple, legible and fast as the 

fastest. Full personal course, &25; 
by mail$»5; first-class references: descriptive '• Sketch" free. 
ROSCOE L. EAMES, Room 556 Parrott Building; telephone Jessie 1011 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 29, 1898. 




JUBILEE week has been a gala one in San Francisco. 
In the first place the clerk of the weather has been 
most obliging; the rain of Monday was held off loDg 
enough to allow the procession to pass its weary length 
along to be viewed by countless thousands, and be dis- 
missed ere the clouds opened; and though the evening was 
moist enough to spoil the firework display, the entertain- 
ments under cover were delightful affairs and largely at- 
tended. The Pioneers made merry with song and dance 
at their hall, and there was a large crowd present. At 
Native Sons' Hail, Pacific Parlor gave a Jubilee ball, 
which was a great success. The ball was beautifully and 
elaborately decorated, the cone-like adornment overhead 
especially eliciting enthusiastic admiration and commenda- 
tion, and from !* o'clock until long past midnight the light 
fantastic was tripped right merrily. The reception and 
banquet given at the Jewett residence on Monday served 
the double purpose of celebrating the day and entertain- 
ing guests from the country whom the Jubilee bad brought 
to the city. The decorations were much admired, being 
emblematic of pioneer and mining days, and the occasion 
was greatly enjoyed by the old veterans, as well as by all 
who were present. 

Tuesday was bright and clear again, and barring the 
cold, nipping air, the weather has, in the main, been satis- 
factory. The Native Daughters held a reception in Na- 
tive Sons' Hall between the hours of 'Z and 5 o'clock on 
Tuesday afternoon, during which time the place was liter- 
ally packed. At the ball in the evening there was vocal 
and instrumental music first, and the crowd was again so 
great it was with difficulty the dancing which followed 
could be indulged in. Athletic sports have pleasantly 
filled up the rest of the Jubilee programme, and to-night 
the Mining Fair will open at the Pavilion. 

The hop at the Presidio on Tuesday evening was a very 
pleasant one, so many of the San Francisco belles partici- 
pated. One party was under the care of Mrs. C. C. 
Keeney, with whom tbey had dined previous to leaving 
town. The second dance of the Cinderellas came off at 
Native Sons' Hall on Wednesday evening, and was equally 
successful with the first meeting of this new exclusive 
club. Thursday evening's event was the ball given by the 
Century Club at their rooms on Sutter street. 

Between the Symphony concerts at the Tivoli and the 
Beecher lectures at the Century Club Hall, which are 
given on alternate Thursday afternoons, our fashionable 
dames and belles are occupied those davs to the exclusion 
of nearly everything else, for to miss one of either, unless 
for some excellent reason, would be almost a social sin. 
The concert had its turn this week, and the Tivoli was. if 
possible, better filled than at any of the preceding ones. 

Party calls at the Borels', both afternoon and evening, 
amounted to a regular "tea." Calls were made after the 
concert and during the evening until quite a late hour. 

Lunt's Hall, on Polk street, has been re-christened, and 
will hereafter be known as Cotillion Hall, somewhat to the 
regret of those who cherish pleasant memories of delight- 
ful hours passed at "Lunt's. The Saturday Evening 
Cotillion Club was among the first of like organizations to 
occupy it under its new nomenclature, and it seemed as 
though they assembled in larger numbers than usual in 
honor thereof. There also was held the usual dance of the 
Friday Fortnightlies last evening, when the cotillion was 
led by Mr. Ed. Sheldon, with Miss Susie Blanding as his 
partner. The next meeting will be held at Golden Gate 
Hall on Thursday evening, the Kith of February, so as not 
to conflict with the dance of the Friday Night Cotillion 
Club, which will take place at XativeSons' Hall on the 
11th of February. The Fortnightlies dance will be the 
Army ard Navy Cotillion, which will be under the special 
guidance of Lieutenant Nolan. U. S. A. 



To-day is well-filled up with engagements. Among others 
there will be a reception by the Forum Club in their rooms 
on Grant avenue this afternoon at 3 o'clock. Dr. and 
Mrs. George H. Powers give a tea at their residence on 
Mason street, when the hostess will be assisted by her 
1 daughter Catherine, Mrs. L. L. Baker, and the Misses 
Moody. Sabine, Bigelow, Simpson, Bruce. Anthony, Dick- 
son and Thomas. A corresponding number of young gen- 
tlemen will join the party at dinner after the reception is 
over. This evening Miss Bernie Drown gives a dance at 
the handsome home of her parents on Washington streets. 

Teas and dances alternate these January days, and 
though the month has not been so full as usual of those 
mild entertainments as the former generally prove to be, 
they are by no means neglected. At Mrs. Herrin's tea 
last Saturday there was a charming gathering of belles 
and an equally large number of beaux in attendance. The 
house was elaborately decorated, and delicious refresh- 
ments were served. Mrs. Richard Bayne. Mrs. Avery 
McCarthy, and the Misses Mary and Clem Kip, Kate and 
Maggie Salisbury, Susie Blanding, Helen Wagner. Helen 
Thornton, and Palacbe assisted the hostess in her duties. 
The tea given by the Misses Helen and Mollie Thomas 
was a very pleasant one, and all the more enjoyable from 
being informal to a degree. The same can also be said of 
the tea given last Sunday by Miss Alice Hager in compli- 
ment to her cousin. Miss Johnson, who is at present visit- 
ing the family. Mrs. Tim Hopkins, who has been a guest 
at the Palace Hotel most of the season, repaid some of her 
social obligations by a luncheon last week at the Univer- 
sity Club, at which Mrs. Benedict was guest of honor. 

There was a pretty wedding in Berkeley on Tuesday 
evening, where, at the home of the bride's father, B. F. 
Bergin. Miss Ethel Bergin and Frank N. Lowell were 
united in marriage by the Reverend Dr. Coyle, of the 
First Presbyterian Church of Oakland. Miss Emma Ber- 
gin was her sister's maid-of-honor: Miss Edna Lowell and 
Miss Maggie Smith officiated as bridesmaids, and Fred L. 
Lowell supported his brother as his best man. The en- 
gagement of Miss Edna Lowell and Harry S. Scott is an- 
nounced, the wedding to be an event of the near future. 

The reception given by the Misses Feldman last Friday 
evening was in honor of their brother, E. H. Feldman, of 
Portland, Oregon, who is here on a visit, and was a de- 
lightful affair in every respect. The guests were limited 
to fifty, and the earlier hours of the evening passed in 
playing Hearts, for which the prizes were pretty and 
novel. Then followed dancing, and then supper, after 
which there was dancing again for an hour more. 

What a jolly week the coming one is to be. The de 
Guigne reception, the Terpsichorean dance, the Whittier 
dinner and cotillion, and the Murphy balcottiimt are among 
the most notable affairs, and coming upon succeeding 
nights, what a weary set of " tootsies " some of our belles 
will have by the end of the week ! In addition there are to 
be luncheons and dinners, and possibly a couple of teas, 
■ though the probabilities are they will be postponed until 
the following week. 

One of the most successful and charming gatherings of 
. the past week was the Assembly and German given by the 
members of the Entre Nous Cotillion, on last evening, at 
the Palace Hotel. The young ladies were all handsomely 
attired and the scene during the German was a brilliant 
one. Six pretty and novel figures were danced under the 
leadership of Mr. Sanford G. Lewald, assisted by his part- 
ner Miss Katie Poheim. Those participating in the first 
set were: Mr. and Mrs. Geo. D. Graham, Mr. H. C. 
Warwick and Miss Maud Haas, Mr. W. Meussdoffer and 
.Miss Felice Kingsford. Dr. T. J. Frazer and Miss Minnie 
Young. Joe F. Poheim Jr. and Miss Mabel Hollis. Mr. and 
Mrs. J. J. De Haven, Jas. T. Ludlow and Miss Macauley, 
Leo. Pockwitz and Miss Mizpah Fredericks, A. H. 
Meussdoffer and Miss Elizabeth Kavanagh. Wm. F. Hooke 
and Miss Nellie G. Martland, Vincent O Neil and Miss 
<"am).e. Dr. Stinson and Miss Phillips, Henrv A. Whitley 
aid Miss Reid, Jasar (!ou!d and Miss Shroeder. 

Among recent guests at the Hotel Rafael were Mr. and 

Mrs. H. H. Sherwood, Mrs. Pieginald Brooke, Oscar T. 

I Sewell. Consul Artsimovitch, Mr. and Mrs. Fleishman, etc. 



January 29, 1898. 



SAN 1--RAXCISC0 NEWS LETTER. 



23 



The special feature of Washington's birthday will be the 
banquet of the Sons of the American Revolution at the 
Palace Hotel. The members of this organization are all 
descendants of men who served their country in the peril- 
ous times of 177t>, and special efforts are being made to 
have the forthcoming demonstration lively, entertaining 
and patriotic. It has leaked out that the affair will have 
special historical significance. 

Invitations are out for the wedding of Miss Alice Lillian 
Deming and Harry Corson Clarke, the ceremony to take 
place on Wednesday, February nth. A reception will be 
held at the home of the bride's parents, at 716 Ellis street, 
from 9 to 11 r. M, on that evening. 

We are soon to lose Miss Genevieve Goad, who will 
spend the rest of the winter the other side of the Conti- 
nent. Mrs. Phoebe Hearst has gone on a visit to the 
City of Mexico. Mr. and Mrs. Joe Grant have returned 
from their visit to Oregon. 

The Palace Hotel Grill Room has been a muchly-sought 
place these Jubilee times, couutry visitors being anxious 
to see what the famed resort was like, with the result that 
they were enchanted with the delicious meals served there 
and the beauty of the surroundings. 

Theatre parties are, for the moment, set aside; but 
Lenten days are near at hand, and then no doubt there 
will be a revival of them. 

Mrs. Julia Melville Snyder, the well-known teacher of 
dramatic acting, elocution, singing and piano, has moved 
to 239 Powell street, rooms 6 and 7. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. C. La Montague left for the East last 
Wednesday morning. 

The Friday evening song recitals given by Anton Schott 
at Y. M. C. A. Auditorium have been a decided success. 
Mr. Schott's popularity is evidenced by the .large 
audiences, who greet every number and enthuse over the 
rare musical treat he has afforded them. 



THE floral market in the big tent in Union Square, and 
in which the patriotic ladies, headed by Mrs. Lovell 
White and the State Floral Society, are showing what 
fifty years of floriculture in California means, is an un- 
qualified success. The booths have been crowded with de- 
lighted visitors during the three days of the show, and the 
display of flowers in the market is a bewildering tribute 
to the soil and climate of the State in January — and all 
other months of the year. This show of bud and blossom 
originated with Mrs. White, and has been one of the de- 
lightful features of the Jubilee week. 

SINCE the Klondike, craze has re-started, there has 
suddenly sprung into business quite a new and alto- 
gether profitable industry, which promises to do away 
with the highly honorable office of Poundtnaster, and the 
still more honorable calling of dog-catching. Small boys 
having heard that fabulous prices are paid for dogs, have 
started in to steal them, and offer them to the out-going 
argonauts at fabulous prices. Who shall say that the 
small boy is not enterprising when he steals large dogs, 
and succeeds, too, in selling them for larger prices. 

The Chinese took part in last Monday's parade, but, as little 
Johnnie might say, if you want Japanese curios, tapestries, ivory 
carvings, etc., you will liave to go to George Marsh & Co.'s. at G25 
Market street, under the Palace Hotel. Tbey have a splendid as- 
sortment of these fashionable goods, and are selling tbem at' very 
reasonable prices indeed. 

Shibt Waist Buttons, Silver Links, and other novelties in sterling 
stiver at J. N. Brittain's, watchmaker and Jeweler, 20 Geary street. 



Dressmaking Parlors. Prices 85 up. Perfeot satisfaction. 
B. Campbell, 714 McAllister St. Telephone, Steiner 1693. 



Y. M. C. A. Auditorium. 



Ellis and Masou Sis., 
San Francisco. 



ANTON SGHOTT RECITALS. 

Six Educational Soog Recitals onFriday evenings, commencing 
January Uth. and to be continued lor five weeks. 
FRIDAY EVENING, 8:15 o'clock. 
Prices— $1 and 50 cents. 



H 



SAN FRANCISCO BAY. 

OW wanton through the fading years, 

Thy waters ebb and flow, 
The clouds above dissolve in tears, 
This life raay cease its hopes and fears, 
Thy waters ever glow. 

In visions o'er thy silver sheen, 

My thoughts now steal away, 
Where, flowing through the walls between, 
The heaving swells from ocean green, 

Rush onward to the bay I 

Or where the hills in templed heights, 

Ascend from sandy snore, 
Beam forth a thousand starry lights. 
That tower high in lofty flights, ■ 
Above the surge's roar. 

Then waft me where the rivers wide, 

In rippling floods of light, 
That onward to thy bosom glide, 
Their waters in the salt-sea tide, 

To lose their essence bright. 

Again upon thy shore I stand, 

Where summer breezes blow; 
Again I view the sun-kissed land. 
Where rise the hills on every hand, 

Above thy waters low. 

Harry S. Jektner. 



Schilling's Best 



tea 


extracts 


coffee 


and 


soda 


spices 



are all as good in their way as Schilling 's Best 
baking powder. 



Partington's School 



of ... . 
424 FINE STREET, S. F. 

Extra Classes on Saturdays and evenings. 



MAGAZINE and 

NEWSPAPER 

ILLUSTRATION 



LUDLAAL 

928 Sutter St. 



ELOCUTION and 

DRAMATIC ART. 



THe SOLLY WALTER School of Illustration, 

In Pen and ink. 26 O'Farrell Street. 

S1GN0R FERNANDO MIGHELENfl, 

Vocal studio. Y. M. C. A. building, room % third floor. 
Complete artistic preparation, English, Italian, French and Spanish. Pose 
of voice, gesture, repertoire. Reception hours : 1 to 2 p. m. Terms moderate. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Sierra Nevada Silver Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 114 

Amount per share 20 cents 

Levied ...January 19, 1898 

Delinquent in office February 23. 1898 

Dav of Sale ot Delinquent Stock March 13 1898 

E. L. PARKER, Secretary. 
Office: Room 14, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery St., San Franoisco, Cal. 

DIVIDENl NOTICE. 
Pacific Auxiliary Fire Alarm Company. 
A dividend, No. 18. of five cents (5c) per share on the capital stook of this 
company has been declared, payable on and after February 14, 1898. Books 
of transfer close Friday, February 4, 1898. Bv order of tbe Board of Direc- 
tors. W. HANSON Secretary. 

Office; Room 309, Claus Spreckels Building, Market and Third streets, 
San Francisco. Cal. 

WANTED:— Several trustworthy gentlemen or ladies to travel in Cali- 
fornia for established, reliable house. Salary 8780 and expenses. 
Steady position. Enclose reference and self-addressed stamped envelope. 
The Dominion Company. Dept 7, Chicago. 111. 



24 



SAX FRAXCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 29, 1898. 



PERSONALIS. 



THERE is a pleasant story concerning the early ac- 
quaintance of Humbert and the Princess Margherita, 
which illustrates the truth that, as a rule, affection is not 
a considerable factor in royal marriages. However, it is 
undeniable that in the case of these two, the arrangement 
turned out to be a fortunate one. In 1868 Prince Hum- 
bert was 24 years old, and his father wished to find him a 
wife. The wife destined for him — an Austrian archduchess 
—had died. One day Victor Emmanuel told his prime 
minister, General Menabrea, that be must absolutely find 
a spouse for the prince. To this peremptory command the 
soldier quietly remarked that she was already found, and 
he mentioned the Princess Margherita, the beautiful 
daughter of the Duke of Genoa and niece of the king. 
Victor Emmanuel was at first surprised, but resolved to 
make inquiries into the princess' character, and to pay 
her an unexpected visit. So he set out for Turin, and was 
charmed with all he saw. The marriage was in due course 
arranged, and on April 21, 1868, was celebrated. 

Mr. Rudyard Kipling, so says an English exchange, 

has been the recipient of a graceful compliment from the 
Antipodes. A Dr. Nicholls, who was an enthusiastic ad- 
mirer of the works of the Anglo-Indian writer, recently 
died at Port Germain, South Australia, and bis friends 
inscribed on his tombstone the last verse of Kipling's 
L Envoi. A photograph sent to Mr. Kipling elicited 
the following letter: "Dear Sib: — I cannot tell you how 
touched and proud I am to think that you found any 
verses of mine worth}* to put on a good man's grave. 
You must be a brotherly set of folk at Port Germain to 
do what you have done for the doctor's memory, and here 
in England I takeoff my hat to the lot of you. There is 
nothing a man's people value more than the knowledge 
that one of their kin has been decently buried when he has 
gone under in a far country, and some day or other Port 
Germain will get its reward. Will you send me a copy of 
a local paper so that I may know something more about 
your part of the world. What do you do? What do you 
expect? What back country do you serve? And how 
many are there of you'.' I want to learn 'further 
particulars,' as the papers say.'' 

The death of the Duchess of Teck leaves the Duke 

with a very small income, for the $20,000 granted to the 
Duchess as a princess royal reverts to the state. A 
grant will probably be asked for. and the English press 
will probably complain that the British people are made 
to keep a German "pauper prince." The Duke's epider- 
mis is said to be ratber thick in this respect. Henry of 
Battenberg was much more thin-skinned. It is said that 
the taunts burled at him killed bim. 

Prince Mohammed AIL, brother of the Khedive of 

Egypt, is said to be in love with an American. He will 
be permitted to marry the girl of his choice if the Khedive 
has a son born to him. Otherwise Prince Ali must choose 
a partner among the ladies of his own rank f or the sake 
of the The fact that princes who are willing 

to become commoners are getting so numerous seems to 
indicate that the king business isn't what it used to be. 

Sad the married man. who likes to be sympathized with: 
My wife is never happy unle- ,- a grievance. ' 

"How happy sbe must be'" said the oretty girl, and then 
the married man grew strao<_*e:v silent.— Cincinna' 
quirer. 

Nickel Plate — Wett Shore F.tchburg Route. 
The popular low-rale short line between Chicago and Buffalo. Sew 
York. Boston, and other Easter -iree elegantly-equipped, 

Testibuled train' daily; Warner Meepingcare and Sickel Plate Din- 
ingCars. No change of -it York, or rhicaeoto 

Boston. For particulars. ad<l.-e»- B. F. Horner. G. P. and T. A. . Clere- 
land. O.; J. Y. Calahan. G. A. ill .. !]!., or 

Jay W. Adams, P. rocker Building. San Francisco. Cal. 

Mothers. besureaaduse"Mrs. VT.nsloWs Soothing Syrup ' for your 
children while teething . 



No one who knows Mac- 
beth lamp-chimneys will have 
any other — except some deal- 
ers who want their chimneys to 
break. 

Write Macbeth Pittsburgh Pa 



CITY INDEX AND PURCHASER'S GUIDE 

RESTAURANTS. 
Bergez's Restaurant, Academy Building, 332-334 Pise street, below Mont- 
gomery. Booms for ladies and families: private entrance. John Bergez 
Proprietor. 
Mar«on Tortoni, French Rotlsaerie, HI O'Farrell street. Private dining 

rooms and banquet hall. S. Constantlnl, Proprietor 
Poodle Dog Restaurant, S. E. cor. Grant ave. and Bush St. Private 

dining and banquet rooms. Tel 429 A. B BuscoiB Bbci 
Bay State Oyster House and Grill Room, 15 Stockton street and 100 
O'Farrell street. N. M. Adler Proprietor. Telephone Main 5067. 

MEDICAL 

Or. Hall, 14 McAllister St.. near Jones Diseases of women and children. 

POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS 
Hawaiian Stamps a specialty. MAKINS & OO 508 Market street. 
Selections on approval: any place In world. W. F. GREANY. 827 Brannan 
The W. H. Hollls Sump Co., (incorporated). lOSO'Farrell St., S.F. 

BOILER MAKERS. 
P. F. Dundon's 8an Francisco Iron Works, 314. 310, and 318 Main street. 
Iron Work of eTery description designed and constructed. 

San Francisco and North Pacific R'y Co. 



SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. Tibcbos Fbrrt- Foot of Market Street. 
WEEK DAYS— 7:30. 9 ». 1100 a m: 12:35. 3:30 5:10. «:30 p if . Thursdays- 
Extra trip at 11:3jp m Saturdays — Extra trips at 1 :50 and 11:30 P at. 
SUNDAYS— 8:00.9:30. 11:00 a si: 1:30 3:30. 5:00 0:20pm. 

SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FFANCISCO. 
WEEK DAYS— 8:10. 7:50.930. 11:10 am; 12:4&. 3:40. S:10r M. Saturdays- 
Extra tripe at 1:55 and 0:35 p m 
SUNDAYS— 8:10. 9:40. 11:10 AH: 1 :40. 3:40. 5:00. 0:25 p M. 

Between San Francisco and Scbuetzen Park same schedule as above. 



LEAVE 


S. F. 


In Effect Oct. 24. 1897 


ARRIVE ms. F. 


Week Days 


Sundays. 

8:00am 
9:30 am 
5:00pm 


DXSTIVATIOM. 


Sundays 


Week Days 


7:30AM 
3:30pm 
5:10 PM 


NOVAtO. 

Petaluma, 


1 1 40 A M 
0:10 FM 
7:35PM 


8:40 AM 
1035 AM 

im pm 




8:00 AM 


Fulton Windsor. 

rTrPtfls ' -rz 

Geyserville Cloverdale 


7:35 PM 


1035 A M 
032 p M 


7 30am 
3:30 pm 


7 JO AM 


- . , * 


1 Borland, Uriah 


7:35pm 


032 PM 


7.30a M 
3:30pm 


- >, A M 


Guemevllle. 


7.35 pm 


; js a m 

032 P M 


7 30am 
5:10pm 


IDUl 
5:00PM 


Sonoma. 
Glen Ellen 


10:40a m 
0:10pm 


8:40 A M 

« » P M 


7:30am 
3:30pm 


■ I km 

5 J;PM 


SebaatopoL 


IO:40am 1 
7-SPM | 


1035 a m 
832 P M 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West Springs: at Geyserville 
for Skaggs' Springs: at Cloverdale for the Geysers: at Hopland for Hlgn- 
'rCelseyville. Soda Bay. Lakeport. and Bartlett Springs; at 
TJaiab. for Vichy Springs. Saratoga Springs. Blue Lakes. Laurel Del 
Lake. Upper Lake. Porno Potter Vallev Jr.hc Day's. Riverside Lier- 
ley's BoctmeU's Sashedoln Heights. Rullvllie. Boonevllle. Orr's Bot 
Springs. MendoclnoClty. F-. Bragg Westport. Usal. 

Saturday-to-Monday Round Trip Tickets at reduced rates On Sundays. 
Bound Trip Tickets to all points beyond San Rafael at half rates 
TICKET OFFICE— «0 Market St.. 



AW FOSTES Pres. ± Gen. Manager. R 



Chronicle Building 
X- RYAN. Gen. Pass 



Agent. 



Broxcsitis. Sudden changes of ■:■.. weather eaoae Bronchial Troubles. 
will give effective relief. 



Occidental and Oriental Steamship Co. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Steamers leave wharf. FIRST AMD BRANNAN* STREETS, at 1 p sL, for 

YOKOHAMA AN0 HONGKONG. 

calling at ttube (H!o.-oi. Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting at 

Hongkong witk steamers for India, etc No cargo received on board on 

day of sailing. 

Coptic .Thursday. February 3. 1898 

Gaelic (via Hono'ulu) Wednesday, February 28. UB8 

Doric (via Honolulu) .... Saturday. March 12. 1898 

BaXGlc Saturday. April 2, 1898 

Roca-D Trip Ticeets at Rrx>r-cn> Rats*. 

For freight or passage apply at Company s Office. No 421 Market street, 
corner First d. D. STTBRS Secretary 

S. S. "Alameda." Thursday. February 8, 1868. 
S S ■ Australia", for Honolulu only, Thursday. 

998, at SP m 
Line to Coolgardle, Australia, and Capetown 
'riea 

J. D. SPRECKELS At BROS CO.. 
Agents. 114 Montgomery St. Freight office, 723 
Market St.. San Francisco. 



EANIC 




January 29, 1898. 



SAX FRANCISCO NRWS LETTKR. 



25 




UNBEAMS 




"I hardly think you are entitled to a pension," said the 
State official to the Billville applicant. "Your name 
does not appear on the war records. What battles were 
you in '.' " " Well. Colonel." replied the applicant, " ter 
tell the plain truth, I wuzo't in any battles, but I lost my 
voice a-hollerin' whenGen'rul Lee surrendered." — Atlanta 
Constitution. 

"Here's an account of a man." said Mrs. Gadsby, "who 
hasn't spoken a word to his wife for three years." "That's 
rather a rigid adherence to one of the rules of politeness," 
said Gadsby. "Rule of politeness!" said Mrs. Gadsby, in 
a scornful tone. "Yes — never to interrupt a lady while 
she is talking." — Odds and Ends. 

Pills — Dosem has been expelled from the medical asso- 
ciation for advertising contrary to the code. Squills — 
How did he advertise? Pills — Called to lead the prayer 
meeting the other evening, he walked up to the front and 
gave out the hymn, "The Great Physician Now Is Here." 
—Crypt. 

Old Harding — Well, I guess that young Dabsley 's deter- 
mined to marry our Lib in spite of everything. Mrs. 
Harding — Why do you think so, Jeremiah? Old Hard- 
ing — Why, you know, she sang to him, and played the 
piano night before last, and here he is again. — Tid-Bits. 

"Seems to me it costs you a good deal to study," said 
the father, as he handed his son money to buy books with. 
"I know it," replied the youth, pocketing gratefully a $10 
bill, "and I don't study very hard, either." — Harvard 
Lampoon. 

"You," he cried, "are the light of my existence." "Ah," 
she replied, "don't tempt me." "Tempt you?" he ex- 
claimed in surprise. "Yes — to go and blow myself out." 
— Cleveland Leader. 

Mamma — Are you afraid of the dark, Bessie? Bessie — 
No, mamma, I ain't fwaid of the dark, but I'm awfully 
fwaid of 'tings 'at's in the dark 'at you tan't see." — New 
York Evening Journal. 

"Uncle Alex, why do people saw wood and say nothing?" 
"Because the words a man wants to say when he is sawing 
wood would get him turned out of church." — Detroit Free 
Press. 

' Old Nurse— Well, how do you like your new little sister? 
Bertie — Oh, nursie, ask mamma not to name it a girl — 
name it a boy so I can have a kid to play with. — Truth. 

She — Mr. Brown does not pay his wife much attention. 
He — No; the only time I ever knew of his going out with 
her was once when the gas exploded. — Pick-Me-Up. 

She — I see a man in St. Louis has trained a number of 
pigeons to draw him along in a boat. He — Oh, well, I've 
seen pigeon towed men before. — Yonkers Statesman. 

Mrs. o'Donovan — Oi didn't see ye at Pat's fun'ral, Mrs. 
O'Dowd. Mrs. O'Dowd— No, mum! Oi niver injoy 
fun'rals onless they're in me own family. — Judge. 

" What was that noise up in your room last evening ? " 
"That ? Oh, I was breaking the first of my New Year's 
resolutions." — Philadelphia North American. 

"Actor Ratcliffe had a London wife, too, don't you know?" 
"Then he cawn't really be such a bad fellow as they've 
tried to make out." — Cleveland Plain Dealer. 

Mr. Oldboy — I am a self-made man, sir. I began life as a 
barefoot boy. Kennard— Well, I wasn't born with shoes 
on, either." — Glasgow Mail. 

" Does she paint from life ? " " No; from a saucer." - 
Cleveland Plain Dealer. 

A Panorama 440 Miles Long. 
From the Observation (Jar on the New York Central a living pan- 
orama 440 miles long may be seen. This includes tbe Genesse, 
Black River and Mohawk Valleys and 143 miles of the Hudson 
River, including the foothills of the Adirondack Mountains; the 
Capitol at Albany; the Catskill Mountains; the Palisades of tbe 
Hudson and the New York Central's magnificent approach to the 
metropolis— this being the only trunk line whose trains enter the 
city of New fcork. 



Southern Pacific Co. --Pacific System. 

Trains Leave and are Duo to Arrive at SAN FRANCISCO: 
{Main Line. Foot of Market Street.) 



Leave. I 



From January 1, lass. 



I Arrive 



•6:00 A Nlles, San Joso, and way stations »8:45 A 

7:00 A Benicia Suisun, and Sacramento 10:45 A 

7:00 A Marysville. Orovilie. and Redding, via Woodland 5:46 p 

7:00 A Vacavllle and Rurusey 8:45P 

7 :3u A Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, Napa, Callstoga, Santa Rosa 6:15 P 

8:00 A Atlantic Express, Ogden and East 8:45P 

8:30 a Nlles, San Joso, Stockton, lone, Sacramento, Marysville, 

Cbico, Tehama, and Red Blufl 4:15P 

•8:80a Peters, Milton, and Oakdale »7:15P 

9:00a New Orleans Express, Merced, Raymond, Fresno, Bakers- 
field, Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, Doming, El Paso, New 

Orleans, and Eas>t 6:45p 

9:00 a Vallejo, Martinez, Merced, and Fresno 12:15 p 

*l:00p Sacramento River steamers *9:0UP 

1:00 p Nlles, Sin Jose, and Way Stations J9:I5 A 

l:30p Martinez and Way Stations 7:45p 

2:00 p Livermore, Mendota, Haoford, and Visalia 4:15 p 

Livermore San Jose, Niles and vVay Stations tlO:15A 

4:00 p Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, Napa, Callstoga, El Verano 

and Santa Rosa 0:15a 

4 :00p Benicia, Vacavllle, Woodland, Knight's Landing, Marys- 
ville. Orovilie, and Sacramento 10:45A 

4:30p Niles, San Jose, Tracy, and Stockton 7:15 p 

4 :30 p Lathrop, Modesto, Merced, Berenda, Fresno, Mojave (for 

Randsburg), Santa Barbara and Los Angeles 7:45A 

4:30 p Santa Fe Koine, Atlantic Express, for Mojave and East 6:45 p 

15:30 p " Sunset Limited." Los Angeles, El Paso, Fort Worth, Lit- 

tleRock.St Louis, Chicago, and East .. H10:15a 

15:30p "Sunset Limited Annex," El Paso, New Orleans, and East gl0"15 A 

6:U0P European mail, Ogden and East 9:45 A 

6:00p Haywards, Niles and San Jose 7:45A 

J8:00P Vallejo f7:45P 

8:00 p Oregon Express, Sacramento, Marysville, Redding, Port- 
land, Puget Sound and East 8:15A 



SAN LEANDRO AND HAY WARDS LOCAL. (Foot Of Market St.) 


i»6:00 AT 


Melrose, 


7:15 A 


8:00 A 


Seminary Park, ' 


i*B:45 A 


9:00 A 


FlTCHBURG, 


10:45 A 


10 :00A 


Elmhurst, 


11:45 A 


ill .00 A 


San Leandho. 


13:45 P 


{12:00 M 


South San Leandro, 


«1:45 p 




ESTDDILLO, 


13:45 P 


£3:00 P 


Lorenzo, 


«4:45P 


4:00 P 


Cherry, 


(5:45 p 


5:00 P 


and 


6:15 P 


5:30 P 


HAYWARDS. 


7:45 P 


7:00 P 




8:45 P 


8:00 P 


i Runs through to Niles. 


9:45 P 


9:00 P 


t From Niles. 


10:50 P 


ttll:15 P 


[rri2:oo p 



Coast Division (Narrow Gauge?. (Foot of Market St.) 

8:15 a Newark, Centerville, San Jose, Felton, Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruz and way stations 5:50p 

*2:16p Newark, Centerville, San Jose, New Almaden, Felton, Boul- 
der Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal way stations *10:5Ua 

4 :15p Newark, San Jose and Los Gatos 9:20.* 

fll:45p Hunters' Excursion, San Jose and Way Stations 1,7:20P 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 

From San Francisco— Foot of Market street (Slip 8).— *7:15, 9:00, and 
11 :00 a. m., U :00, *2 :00, t3 :00, *4 :00, t5 :00 and *6 :00 p. h. 

From Oaklaito— Foot of Broadway.— *6:00, 8:00, 10:00 A. M.; 112 :00, *1 :00, 
{2 :00, *3 :00, 14 :00 *5 :00 P. M. 

Coast Division (Br oad Gauge). (Third and Townsend streets). 

6:55 A 

9:00 A 



San Jose and way stations (New Almaden Wednesdays only) 
San Jose, Tres Plnos, Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove, Paso Robles 
San Luis Obispo, Guadalupe, Sari and principal vay stations 4 

10 :40 A San Jose and way stations *8 

11 :80 A San Jose and way stations , 8 

*2:30p San Mateo, Redwood, Menlo Park, Santa Clara, San Jose, 
Gilroy, Hollister, Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, Pacific 

Grove *10 

•3:15 p San Jose and Principal Way Stations *9 

*4:15p San Jose and Principal Way Stations 9 

*5 :00 p San Jose and Principal Way Stations 1 

5 :30 p San Jose and principal way stations 5 

6 :30 p San Jose and way stations 7 

til :45p San Jose and way stations 7 



:15p 

:00 a 
;35a 



40A 
.00 A 
45A 
:30p 
:30P 
;80P 
:30P 



A for Morning, p for Afternoon. *Sundays excepted. tSaturdays only. 

JSundays only. tt Monday, Thursday, and Saturday nights only. 

^Mondays and Thursdays. gWednesdays and Saturdays. 

The Pacific Transfer Company will call for and check baggage from 
hotels and residences. Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time Cards and 
other information. 

Pacific Coast Steamship Co. 

Steamers leave Broadway Wharf, San Francisco for ports in Alaska, 
9 a. m.. January 1. 6, 11, 16, 21, 26, 31, and every 5th day thereafter. 

For British Columbia and Puget Sound ports, 9 a. m., January 1, 
6, 11, 16, 21, 26, 31, and every 5th day thereafter. 

For Eureka (Humboldt Bay), Steamer " Pomona," 2 p. m., January 
1,5, 10, 14, 18, 22, 26, 31. February 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 25, 29. 

For Newport, (Los Angeles) and all way ports, 9 A. m. ; January 1, 5, 
9, 13, 19,21,25, 29 and every fourth day thereafter. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Port Harford Santa Barbara. Port Los 
Angeles, Redondo, (Los Angeles) 11 A. m., January 3, 7, 11, 15, 17, 23, 27, 
31, and every fourth day thereafter. 

For ports in Mexico, 10 A. m., January 6, and 2d of each month thereafter. 
The company reserves the right to change, without previous notice, 
steamers, sailing dates, and hours of sailing. 
TICKET OFFICE— Palace Hotel, No. 4 New Montgomery street. 
GOODALL. PERKINS & CO., Gen. Agts., 10 Market St., San Francisco 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 29, 1897 



HOME DECORATION- 



IK the walls be in good condition and have a surface of 
hard-finished plaster, textiles, like cretonne, denim or 
burlap can be applied with paste in the same manner as 
wall paper. If the walls have been papered, and the paper 
is not broken, the textile can be applied directly on the 
paper; but care should be used that all dirt and grease 
spots be rubbed off, then the surface, whether papered or 
not, be gone over with a sizing mixture of glue and water. 

If burlap is the material to be used, it should be bought 
of as great a width as the size of the room will allow it to 
be used with economy, so that there may be as little 
trouble with the joinings as possible. Cut the material to 
fit the space to be covered, allowing an inch or more where 
there are to be joinings, and after the wall has been cov- 
ered with a coating of paste, set immediately in place and 
press down with the hands and a clean cloth. Care should 
be taken to remove all blisters, also that the pressure be 
not enough to force the paste through, and thus stain the 
outer surface. Neat joints may be made by allowiug one 
edge of the materialto overlap the other about one inch, 
then place a straight edge over this joining and cut 
through both thicknesses with a sharp knife. This will 
remove both selvedge edges and leave the clean-cut edges 
of the material to meet on the wall and be held flat by the 
piste. 

In hanging cretonne or denim a different method should 
be followed. These materials being closer in texture form 
better joints by sewing the edges together on a machine, 
then pressing them flat with a hot iron. In this way 
rather large pieces can be put on the wall on which a layer 
of paste has been spread, and soon smoothed out; the un- 
sewed seams of course should be kept in the corners or 
along the frames of doors and windows. 

In hanging plain denim the reverse side is usually shown 
— that is, what is known as the right side is put next to 
the wall, for the reason that the wrong side has a better 
decorative effect, being less hard. In any work of this 
kind the paste should be applied hot with a very large 
brush, such as are used for applying white-wash. 

Where a silk or damask texture is to be hung, it is 
usually tacked at the top, bottom and corners, the tacks 
being afterwards covered by a guimp braid. The advan- 
tage of tacking the material in place is that it can be taken 
down and put up elsewhere if need be. If, however, the 
occupant does not expect to move in a year or two, it can 
be pasted on the walls in the same manner as the cretonne, 
care being used not to stretch the material, and thus spoil 
the pattern. 

In many cases the plain burlap is applied to the wall 
with a view to decorating it later. Color is applied in a 
wash or stain, by means of which varied tones may be 
secured. When the burlap is thor- 
oughly dry it must be sponged off to 
remove any paste that may have been 
forced through, and then gone over 
with a thin sizing composed of ceiling 
varnish and turpentine so that it will 
take the staining color evenly. Do 
not use glue sizing, for this will cause 
the material to curl up and shrink and 
spoil the appearance of the wall. The 
stainiug color should be made very 
thin, in the proportion of three-fourths 
turpentine, one-eighth oil and one- 
eighth dryer, to which a small quan- 
tity of coloring matter is to be added. 

Textile wall coverings require occa- 
sional cleaning by being brushed down 
with a brush or whisk broom to re- 
move the dust and smoke which 
gathers, but they need not be renewed 
very often under ordinary usage. 

Semi-transparent window draperies 
of open-meshed linen canvas offer a 
good field for decoration with tapes- 
try stitches. Variety is introduced 



3 CKK><K><><><><><>C><><><><><><><>0<><>00<><><><><K>0<X>0<>0<>Oj 

1 ANDY CATHARTIC 



CURE CONSTIPATION 



10c. 

25c. 50c. 

Constipation Afflicts 

part of the people all the time, 
all the people part of the time. 
Are you a chronic or occasional sufferer from constipation ? 1 
Do you want a sure, pure cure ? 

CASCARETS (eat 'em like candy) will stimulate ' 
your liver, regulate your bowels, leave your 1 
blood clean and rich, sweeten your breath and [ 
make your stomach do its work. 

CASCARETS kill disease germs, cure; 

sick headache, taste good and do good, please ' 
the children, destroy and drive off worms and 1 
other parasites. 

• ■■■■•*•! 

A 10c box will prove their merit, and put you on 1 
the right road to perfect and permanent health. Try \ 
a ioc box to-day 1 If not pleased, get your money 
back. Larger boxes, 25c or 50c. 



ADDRESS 

Sterling Remedy Co. ; 

OHICAGO OR 
NEW YORK. 255 

5 CKM>C><><><>C>C>0-0-CK> C><K>C^><>0<>0<><>0<><><><XX>CK>CK><>-00 



BOOKLET AND 
SAMPLE 

FRFE 
FOR THE 
ASKING. 




The 
only Cenuine. 
Beware of 
imitations I 



by powdering the upper half of the curtain with small 
geometrical figures worked in shades of shrimp pink, 
golden-green, light blue and soft golden brown, and having 
for the lower half a continuous or repeated design with 
similar coloring. Above the hem of the curtain, threads 
are drawn to the depth of an inch, and strands of the filo- 
selle in three shades of golden brown are run into the in- 
terstices of the drawn work. The most satisfactory ma- 
terial for the tapestry stitches is the old-fashioned filo- 
selle, which is one of the lustreless '•filling silks" intro- 
duced by the Kensington School of Art Needlework. 



Ayres' Business College. 325 Montgomery. Individual instruction. 
shorthand, typewriting, bookkeeping, telegraphy; life'' scholarship, 150; 
low rates per week and month ; day; evening. Send for catalogue. 




Price per Copy, 10 Cents. 



Annual Subscription, $4.00 




«* H l 2^S? , »»o 




tifalif xrrmOCa btxti sjer. 




Vol.LVI. 



SAN FRANCISCO, FEBRUARY 5, 1898 



Number 6. 



Printed and Published every Saturday by tile proprietor. FRED HARRIOTT 
5H Kearny etreet. San Francisco. Entered at San Francisco Post, 
office 09 Second-class Matter. 

Tie office of the NEWS LETTER in New Tort Oity is at Temple Court; 
and at Chicago, 903 Boyce Building, {Frank E Morrison, Eastern 
Representative), where information may be obtained regarding subscrip- 
tion and advertising rates. 

IT must be most nauseating to those persons in this city 
who have been cured by patent medicines, to find out 
after all that they were benefited by counterfeit pills. 
Touching illustrations of misplaced confidence, they have 
been badly swindled! 

IT has been alleged that the Supervisors are responsible 
for the fenderless cars that are operated in this city. 
Many devices have been submitted, but for some reason 
none have been acceptable to the Board. Now, however, 
having grown weary of waiting, the companies have de- 
termined to equip their cars with fenders, and if the 
Supervisors object, the matter will be taken to the courts. 

IT is noted that one John McCarty has made complaint 
to the police against the Alaska Electric Exploration 
and Mining Company for attempted fraud. The News 
Letter is not able to say whether this Exploration Com- 
pany is a fraud or not; but there can be no doubt that 
fraudulent Alaska development companies will spriDg into 
life, and that many an unwary sucker will get severely 
frost-bitten by them long before he gets within a thousand 
miles of the frozen land of gold. 

WHATEVER specious argument may be advanced by 
the Harbor Commissioners in explanation of the suit 
brought against them by the Paraffine Paint Company, 
the fact remains that the bids of the lowest contractor 
were not considered. No amount of explanation can change 
this record. And the erasures and substitutions in the 
books of Darby Laydon & Co. that were proved in court 
have a crooked and dishonest look. Altogether it appears 
that the Paraffine Paint Company has made out its case. 
It will take more than a wave of Colnan's accumulative 
hand and an emphatic denial to overturn the charges made. 

EVERY old hulk that can be kept afloat in a mill pond 
will be fitted up for the Alaska trade this spring, and 
it will be necessary for the authorities to look well after 
the equipments and sea-going qualities of the northern 
fleet if they would protect gold-hunters from drowning. 
Some of the vessels that sailed north last fall should never 
have been permitted to leave the docks, and that their 
passengers were not lost may be charged solely to good 
luck. The northern seas are swept by heavy storms in 
the early spring, and, except the most rigid enforcement 
of laws are maintained, there will be many a man sent to 
the ocean's bed in these frail and rotten ships. 

READY who should have known better has just been 
victimized by one of the fake dental parlors that 
flourish in this city. After paying a considerable sum to 
one of these frauds she was compelled to seek a reputable 
dentist and have the work undone, and then done over 
again. She is, uo doubt, one of hundreds. The cunningly 
worded advertisements of these confidence men, in which 
gold fillings and guaranteed work are furnished for next 
to nothing, are a sure sign of fraud, and the fakirs should 
be avoided as self-confessed swindlers. The laws should 
reach these fellows who endanger the health and lives of 
their victims, beside robbing them. Penitentiaries are 
occupied by better men than they are. 



IN the suit of the Paraffine Paint Company against the 
Harbor Commissioners for awarding contracts for pre- 
serving piles used along the city front, contrary to law, a 
good deal of suspicious-looking testimony is being brought 
out. It appears as if something stronger than creosote 
had been used in protecting the piles furnished by Darby 
Laydon & Company. 

IT is unfortunate that the city Pound has been again 
dragged back into politics by the appointment of Os- 
born to the position of Poundmaster. Jake Lindo made 
the department a reeking scandal years ago, and it has 
ever since been redolent of foul smells and corrupt politi- 
cal combinations. The return of Osborn to the job he was 
thrown out of means that a new combination has been 
formed, and that the old order of things will be renewed. 

EX- COLLECTOR Welburn, whose escape from justice 
for embezzling funds of the Government is fresh in 
the public mind, has been again indicted by the Grand 
Jury. That he is not to-day in confinement for his un- 
doubted crimes is a disgrace to the criminal machinery of 
our courts. Welburn is now in hiding or has left the 
country. His guilt was clearly established last fall, and 
the failure to convict him was a palpable miscarriage of 
justice. The same influences that saved him before would 
in all probability gain his acquittal on a second trial. The 
fact that he is undoubtedly guilty must inspire his friends 
with every hope that he would get off scot-free. 

THE interior press quite heartily seconds the views of 
the News Letter that the State University at 
Berkeley badly needs an overhauling; and that the work 
should begin at the antiquated and somewhat superfluous 
head of that institution. The Fresno Expositor says: 
"Somehow, they seem to have gotten into a rut at Berke- 
ley, and one feels that the long metre doxology is floating 
about in the air. Dr. Jordan, of Stanford, has out-classed 
them. He keeps himself and Stanford in the foreground, 
and does it with consummate tact and ability. They need 
a young, able and aggressive man at Berkeley; super- 
annuated ministers make no better teachers than they do 
preachers." We commend these facts to the Regents. 

IT has been alleged that Supervisor Delany has attempted 
to blackmail the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty 
to Animals; and Supervisor Haskins is charged with hav- 
ing sought a bribe of $250 as the price of permitting a 
prize-fight. These are charges that are to take up the 
attention of the Grand Jury. In addition, the whole Board 
and the City Architect are to be grilled for having failed 
to force the completion of the new Hall of Justice on 
Kearny street. As to this last, there can be no doubt 
that the Board has shown a shameless disregard of the 
people's interests, and that the contractors have con- 
temptuously broken every valid obligation of their con- 
tracts. They have made no attempt to be fair, and an}' 
warmed-over, half-baked excuse they have seen fit to 
offer has been accepted by the Board. The delay has cost 
the merchants of Kearny street a considerable loss of 
business, and the taxpayers have been utterly ignored as 
usual. The Board deserves a vigorous overhauling; the 
contractors should be kicked out, their bonds forfeited, 
and the work completed under the supervision of the 
City's Architect, as contemplated by law in such cases. As 
for the personal charge against Delany and Haskins — 
they have not admitted that they are guilty; in fact, they 
have denied it. A rigid and thorough investigation alone 
can determine whether they are telling the truth or only 
joking. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 5, 1898. 



THE PRESIDENT'S NEW YORK SPEECH. 

IT is clear that President McKinley had a set purpose in 
accepting the invitation to dine with the National As- 
sociated Manufacturers at New York. The time had ar- 
rived when he had something of moment to say to the 
Nation and he went there to say it. The result was a 
speech that will be read with interest, not in the United 
States only, but throughout the world; that antagonized 
the Senate and the Administration upon an issue that will 
ultimately hurl every Senator who voted for the Teller 
resolution into oblivion, and that happily, as we believe, 
will relieve the tension felt everywhere as to the inten- 
tions of this great country to repudiate its obligations in 
part. In the ringing words of the noble assurance just 
given by the President of the United States: "the money 
of our country is, and forever must be unquestioned and 
unassailable. Nothing should ever tempt us— nothing ever 
will tempt us to scale down the sacred debt of the nation 
through a legal technicality. Whatever may be the 
language of the contract, the United States will discharge 
all its obligations in the currency recognized as the best 
throughout the civilized world at the time of payment." 
Those words, ennobling the President as they do, are still 
more ennobling to the people in whose name he uttered 
them. At the last election a plurality of over 600,000 gave 
him a mandate to say just those very things. That plur- 
ality, cast under many adverse circumstances, would, if 
the election had to take place to-day, be at least doubled. 
When a large majority of the people refused to repudiate 
at a time when little else seemed left for them to do, it is 
obvious that the President voices the common honesty of 
the country when he says that it never should, and never 
will discharge its obligations in money worth less than luo 
cents on the dollar. That now stands as the assurance of 
two administrations, each representing one of the two 
great parties iuto which the country is divided. Cleveland 
for the Democracy, and McKinley for the Republicans, 
have, in their most serious mood, and in their most earn- 
est language, committed the nation, with its expressed 
approval, to the payment of all debts, public and private. 
in honest money. 

The latest repetition of this assurance ought not to have 
been needed, but it was. The country fought out that 
fight at the last election, ratified the St. Louis platform, 
and elected William McKinley of Ohio to the greatest 
office on earth, believing that he would stand, as he is 
standing, on that platform as firm as a rock of adamant. 
But in the Senate it was clearly being forgotten that there 
had been an election in November. ISitii, and it proceeded 
to say that less than forty-five cents on the dollar was a 
sufficient discharge of the Government's debts. The 
speeches in favor of that proposition were peculiarly irri- 
tating and calculated to injure the credit of the country, 
to breed distrust at home and abroad, and to even pre- 
cipitate another financial panic. Senator Teller, the 
leader of the cheap money majority, said in the course of 
the debate: " I want to say here and now that I believe in 
paying the debts of the Government in silver, even if that 
is the cheapest metal. The Government has a right to 
the difference." His resolution, which was finally adopted 
by the very substantial majority of fifteen, was of like 
tenor with his speech. When the result of the vote was 
announced, Senator Vest exultantly exclaimed: " that 
means the free and unlimited coinage of silver." Another 
Senator denounced the President for "not having the 
nerve to kick Secretary Gage out of the Treasury. " 

But the President had the nerve to do something bet- 
ter. Hardly had the blatant words and traitorous votes 
of the Senators been recorded, when up rose the President 
of the United States and calmed a storm that would other- 
wise have surely arisen. Probably no speech ever deliv- 
ered was better timed, or more effective in achieving a 
great purpose. The House the next day promptly in- 
dorsed the President by fifty majority. The press of the 
country, so far as it is independent of the silver mine 
owners, is almost unanimous in its hearty approval of his 
course, and public opinion is everywhere with him. It is 
but due to him and his great effort'that all honest citizens, 
regardless of past party affiliations, should bear in mind 
his closing exhortation and strive to give it effect. Said 
he: " Our citizens cannot be excused if they do not, under 



present conditions, redouble their efforts to secure such 
financial legislation as will place their honorable inten- 
tions beyond dispute. It is not enough nowadays for peo- 
ple to say tbey are in favor of honest money. The people's 
purpose must be given the vitality of public law." 

A Word of The utmost warning that can be given will 
Warning. utterly fail to prevent the unieasoning rush 
of miners, prospectors, and adventurers into 
Alaska. The probability of death from cold and starva- 
tion has no terrors for the thousands who are even now in 
the very dead of winter hastening as rapidly as steam 
can carry them toward that inhospitable country. 

There can be no doubt that great wealth lies hidden in 
the frozen North; and that immense fortunes will be accu- 
mulated there in the next few years is equally true. But 
the rose-colored stories that are brought out of the Yukon 
by returning miners are great exaggerations. The state- 
ments of large fortunes earned in a single season, making 
princes out of the penniless, are nine times out of ten far 
beyond the truth. If a man have ten thousand dollars in 
nuggets, the owner doesn't hesitate to make it forty or 
eighty or one hundred thousand dollars: and his powerful 
imagination finds a ready ear and strong stimulant in the 
reporters sent out by the daily papers. Like scandals, 
these stories grow as they travel. There are returned 
miners in this city to-day who are reported to have 
brought from the Yukon anywhere from $60,000 to $100,- 
000, when, as a matter of fact, one-eighth of those sums 
are far nearer the truth. There is no disposition to reach 
the facts. Such wild and exaggerated reports of fortunes 
gained in a moment fatten by what they feed on. and the 
foolish and feverish imagination is ready to accept the 
most improbable and baseless yarns and stamp them as 
gospel truth. Following in the trail of these fabulous accu- 
mulations may be seen an army of mining companies and 
corporations — many of them pledging easy and certain 
wealth to every man. woman, and child who will invest in 
their stock and bolster up their wild-cat claims. Stocks 
will be sold in mining properties that never existed; and 
locations disposed of that never belonged to the alleged 
owners. The country is ripe for just this sort of swindling, 
and every conceivable method that can be operated by 
sharpers, thieves, and that immense army of semi-respect- 
able men who operate just outside the shadow of the peni- 
tentiaries, will be worked at high pressure, and rake in a 
golden harvest. There will be honest and legitimate min- 
ing companies organized for legitimate business in the 
Yukon country, and conducted on business principles, just 
as there are rich mines in Alaska and fortunes to be gained 
there. But it will require vigilance of a superior order to 
avoid the many swindling devices that await the confiding 
public, who hope to lay down one dollar and pick up one 
hundred in return for it. 

is Cuba Nearing It looks as if the hand of President 
a Cnsis McKinley may be forced, and that he 

may be compelled to do something 
about Cuba, although it is evident that his wishes do not 
incline to a possible war. He would like to see the island 
pacified and once more prosperous under a system of 
autonomy that would satisfy the natives and afford an 
opportunity for the gratification of their ambitious. To 
do him justice, it is but fair to say that Captain-General 
Blanco appears to be making an honest attempt to bring 
about just that condition of affairs. If he but succeeds he 
will deserve well of his country and of humanity. It must 
be confessed, however, that the outlook for success 
is as bad as it can be. Blanco has now other enemies to 
deal with than those in the field. The people, mostly resi- 
dents of Havana, who have remained out of the rebellion, 
and more or less loyal to the existing order of things, fear 
the consequences of setting up a new form of government 
in which the rebel chiefs would necessarily be the leaders, 
and for that reason are now favoring annexation to the 
United States. They think that neither their lives nor 
their property would be safe at the hands of the not over 
scrupulous men they have all along opposed. If home rule 
be established, it would seem to be necessary for Spain, or 
some strong power, to maintain a hold upon the place un- 
til all parties are fairly dealt with. She cannot altogether 
withdraw and leave her loyal people to the mercy of the 



February 5, 1898. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



negroes, Creoles, and other nondescripts, who constitute 
the bulk of the Cuban army. That is the real difficulty 
now in the way of pacifying Cuba, and is at the bottom of 
the recent rioting in Havana. How it will all end it is 
difficult at this distance to foresee. It may be that the 
lives and property of citizens of this country will be so 
menaced that our Government will be compelled to inter- 
vene. The sending of the man-of-war Maine to the harbor 
of Havana was doubtless intended as a precautionary 
measure. It is well to be prepared for possible eventual- 
ities. We take it that the sudden appearance of German, 
French and English vessels of war has no other meaning 
than the protection of their people in case of trouble. 
It looks as if affairs in Cuba were nearing some sort of a 
crisis. 

Since the foregoing was put in type the speech of Con- 
gressman Hill has come to hand, and it foreshadows that 
what we have rather intimated than said in the preceding 
paragraph is true. The gravity of his speech is found in 
the facts that he is at the head of the House Committee 
on Foreign Affairs; that he is known to be in frequent 
consultation with the President, has seen all the corres- 
pondence with Spain, and voices the policy of the Admin- 
istration. When he affirmed that the President "would 
not disappoint the expectations of his countrymen," he 
made it clear that intervention is not far distant. Presi- 
dent McKinley, he declared, had "protested with em- 
phasis and energy against General Weyler's conduct of 
the war, and had procured his recall." Furthermore, he 
had "informed the Sagasta government that the war 
must cease within a reasonable time." This, of course, is 
clear intervention, and plainly has the threat of force be- 
hind it. Congress was told, in the speech from which we 
are quoting, that " a faithful pilot was at the helm, and 
that it should hold itself in readiness to support him when 
he takes the step which the honor and interests of the 
country demand." This semi-official talk is not to be 
taken lightly. If it means anything at all, it means that 
the too-long-maintained and exasperating Cuban difficulty 
is neaping an interesting crisis. 

A Freo Love There is a Free Love Society here. Its 
Society. members are old widows that have fought 
the good fight and old maids that have 
been kept busy looking for a fight. The first are storm- 
beaten wrecks that have weathered the tempest of matri- 
mony. The latter are derelicts on love's troubled sea and 
praying to Venus for a tow. The first believe anything 
they had is not worth having; the latter, that anything 
they cannot get isn't worth getting. Their constitution is 
a well-digested objection to any objection of the seventh 
commandment. The chief promoter of this anti-love- 
perish-and-obey combine, is a widow; nothing strange. 
She says woman will soon propose to man, instead of dis- 
posing of his proposal. This i's the only woman's conven- 
tion we know of in which the members agree. Their agree- 
ment arises from the knowledge that it disagrees with 
everybody but themselves. The escutcheon of the Trust 
is one widow couchant; with two old maids unnecessarily 
rampant. Gupid stands in the background forging arrows 
at a fire fed with marriage licenses. Encircling his head, 
like a halo, is the motto of the society: "'Tis better to 
have loved and been caught, than never to have loved 
at all." 

Coinan And The How comes it that public officials will 
Harbor Trust. not bear in mind that a public office is 
a public trust? That is, that public 
employment should be entered upon with the same sense 
of personal integrity, and the same determination to do 
the best possible for the employer that is ordinarily evinced 
by men engaged in banks, mercantile houses and private 
life generally. If there should be any difference in the 
honesty of the persons engaged in the various trusts, it 
should be the more rigid as against men honored with 
public employment. Their positions are offices of honor 
as well as of emolument. They pull and haul and fight 
for their positions as if their very lives depended upon 
their appointment. They insist upon their good intentions, 
and upon their zeal to "make a record for themselves of 
which any man might be proud"; yet they are no sooner 
installed in office than they cast around for ways and 



means to betray their trust by making dirty money out of 
dirty jobs. We wish we could say that this charac- 
terization of official delinquency were an exception to the 
general rule. But it is not. At this very moment nearly 
all our officials are under suspicion of wrong doing. From 
Harbor Commissioner to pound keeper they are all under 
fire. The latest development is that the harbor depart- 
ment is not what it ought to be. Intrusted with the 
management of the entire city front, with power to grant 
privileges and withhold them, and to restrain or promote 
trade, that department ought to be in touch with our whole 
mercantile community, and be an open book that all men 
may read with pleasure and profit. If it grants priveleges 
to one firm that it denies to another; if its members 
privately exact largess for the "favors" it is in their 
power to grant, and, in short, if harbor accommodations 
are bestowed for favor, or presents in the nature of bribes, 
then, indeed, is a great state trust being sadly abused, and 
our port in a sure way to lose its prestige. We do not 
know of our own knowledge and therefore do not say that 
any or all of these things are being done, but the investi- 
gation now on foot looks ugly, and the way that certain of 
the commissioners meet it does not inspire confidence. In 
this connection, it is fair to point out that Mr. Commis- 
sioner Coinan occupies a position of greater responsibility 
towards the public than his two associates. Because of 
the manner of his appointment more is expected of him. 
He was fellow townsman, private secretary, political 
agent and Fidus Achates of Governor Budd, and is chair- 
man of the Harbor Commission. It was announced at the 
time that the Governor was so anxious about the depart- 
ment that he had selected a Simon pure man to make it 
what it ought to be. If Coinan now falls the State Ad- 
ministration goes with him. 

Words of A Mr. H. M. Walbrook of England re- 
English Praise, cently delivered a lecture on the Ameri- 
can press in Brighton, before the Sus- 
sex Institute of Journalists, and strange to say gave the 
highest praise to our journalism. This is most flattering 
to our national pride. The gentleman said that in Eng- 
land the leader was heavy and dull, acting as a sedative, 
and though each sentence bore the impress of reliability 
and responsibility, it was eminently hard reading. It was 
quite the reverse with the American leader. It was 
frothy, bright, cynical, and vastly amusing, but it con- 
veyed an acute idea of unreliability. It was to the re- 
porter, however, and to reportorial work that Mr. Wal- 
brook gave the fullest praise. He could not find a sufficient 
number of adjectives to laud the descriptive work done by 
our young men of the local staff. It may be also remarked 
that he did not encourage the Institute to copy our 
methods. The English journalist is possessed of the foolish 
notion to be accurate. Here accuracy would meet with 
distinct disapproval — that is, by the yellow journals. There 
are some papers who do try to secure facts, while the yel- 
low journals purposely distort tbem. Interviews are 
giver, which have never taken place, and letters are 
printed with signatures attached which have never been 
sent. But that is only in the line of progress; and we 
have to maintain our credit for being bright and amusing. 
It is a vast pity that the Sussex Institute of Journalists 
could not hire for a series of lectures Mr. Andrew Law- 
rence. One thing is certain, that if the said gentleman 
printed a paper in England similar to the one here, he 
would very shortly make along and intimate acquaintance 
with the inside of a British prison. And the English pub- 
lic would turn to Punch as a relief for solid reading. 

The Drugs We Some forty druggists in this city have 
Put Into been found out, it is said, in selling drugs 

Our Bodies. for what they are not. A wholesale 
manufactory of spurious pills, and other 
imitations of patent remedies, has been unearthed, the 
printer of the false labels has been discovered, and prose- 
cutions have been instituted. These things have been 
brought to light by the suspicions created in the minds of 
Eastern patentees when they found that their protected 
remedies were being retailed h,ere at less than wholesale 
prices. Forty druggists are a great many to have bagged 
in a single city engaged in making a living by fraud. Yet 
it is not as certain as it might be that their nefarious 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 5, [898. 



transactions have not been as productive of as much good 
as evil. One of the imitations, when analyzed, is said to 
have been found to contain nothing more potent than flour 
and bitter almonds. Now the question arises: was not that 
innocuous compound less injurious than the genuine article? 
If it was, the druggist was doing good by stealth, even 
though he might blush to find it name. It would be curi- 
ous to know just what effect these harmless pills had upon 
the troubles which the takers of them imagined they suf- 
fered. An eminent physician of this city, now deceased, 
who enjoyed a very large practice, used to say that he 
cured more patients with just such a pill as the imitation 
described than with any other drug in the pharmacopoeia. 
He was wont to say it was the bitter almonds that 
did the work. The more almonds the more nauseous the 
dose, and the more effective the remedy. Nothing has 
more effect upon the imagination, he used to say, than 
nastiness. When he saw that nature had only to be let 
alone to effect a cure, it would not satisfy the patient to 
tell him so, and resort was at once had to the bitter pill, 
of the remedial effects of which he was constantly bearing. 
This practice we have heard justified by other good physi- 
cians. If, then, the doctor may legitimately engage in it, 
why may not the pharmacist also ? Its merit consists in 
its safety. The trouble is that we pour too many drugs 
of which we know little into bodies of which we know noth- 
ing. The newspapers report that a man in New York 
the other day took six pills, arguing that if one pill would 
do good, six would do six times as much good. He is dead, 
but his experience lives. People to some extent are fol- 
lowing his example every day. Our medical societies are 
not doing what they might to lessen this evil. They say 
that in the end it brings them business. 

Why Annexation The treaty providing for the annexa- 
Hangs Fire. tion of the Hawaiian Islands does not go 
though with that alacrity which the 
sugar planters expected and desired. In fact, its ratifi- 
cation is now conceded to be but a forlorn hope. It lacks 
the necessary two-thirds majority in the Senate, and the 
unconstitutional device of adopting it by a joint resolution 
of both houses has apparently been defeated by the czar of 
the house, who, in addition to being honestly opposed to 
annexation, is desirous of putting the administration in a 
hole. No joint resolution will get through as long as Tom 
Reed of Maine is speaker with a docile majority at his 
back. But far above and beyond these Congressional 
moves are the earnest able appeals that are being made 
by the independent and disinterested journals of the coun- 
try to the sober second sense of those who are clothed 
with authority to act in the premises. No more able or 
patriotic articles have appeared in any newspaper pub- 
lished in the United States since the war, than those which 
have for weeks past been printed against the Hawaiian 
annexation scheme by such papers as Harper's Weekly, the 
Springfield Republican, the New York Nation, and other 
organs of opinion whose independence is above suspicion. 
The arguments against annexation have simply been over- 
whelming. No wonder that Congress is hesitating and 
dallying with the question. The pretense that if Hawaii is 
not annexed it will be taken by some other power is idle. 
The islands are admitted on all hands to be within "the 
sphere of our influence," and that phrase is now interna- 
tional law. Besides, nobody would take the islands as a 
gift. 

Judge Morrow's Anti- The decision of Judge Morrow, of 
Trust Doci.ion. the United States Court, sitting 
in this city in the case of the Coal 
Dealers' Trun, is of more than local importance. It will 
be received with interest throughout the country, and be 
commented upon by the press generally. It is a clear ex- 
position of the law, and a very direct application of it to 
the fa.ts. The Coal Dealers' Association is easily found 
to be an organization in restraint of trade. It established 
arbitrary prices for coal, from which the dealer was not 
permitted to deviate in any particular. It stifled all com- 
petition between retailers, restricted trade within pre- 
scribed limits, and established a monopoly of the closest 
kind in an article of daily 1 onsumption and of prime neces- 
sity. These the learned Judge found to be the facts. The 
law is held to be that as the coal is brought from other 



States and countries, the selling of it is inter-State com- 
merce, which Congress alone has the power to regulate. 
This Congress has done in the act of January 2, 1890, by 
virtue of which Judge Morrow holds that commerce be- 
tween the States, and between tbem and foreign nations 
must be absolutely free and untrammeled, except as it 
maj be regulated by Congress, and no contract or agree- 
ment on the part of individuals, associations or corpora- 
tions will be permitted directly or indirectly to hinder or 
restrain its natural current and volume. The coal dealers 
organized their trust very clumsily, or they would not 
have come to grief so easily. Trusts, all over the country, 
successfully evade the law by the secrecy of their real 
methods. Their articles of incorporation, instead of re- 
vealing, skillfully disguise the objects had in view. Un- 
lawful combines have to be made up, and managed in 
large part, by men who trust one another. This was not 
the case with the local Coal Dealers' Association. Its 
constitution and b3 r -laws revealed its whole scope and pur- 
pose, and supplied the only evidence necessary to bring it 
within the purview of the law. It will now probably at- 
tempt to amend its methods and try again. Meanwhile, it 
is estopped from doing business by an injunction. 

Tho Examiner's With a cheap and shoddy method that 
Latest Fraud. is inseparably connected with the livid 
journalism, the Examiner some days 
ago had a warrant issued for the arrest of Mr. H. E. 
Huntington for a misdemeanor, in that the company of 
which he is the President had failed to equip its cars with 
fenders for the protection of life. Three days before the 
warrant was issued Huntington left San Francisco for 
New York, and was two thousand miles away when the 
yellow journal and its little managing editor were frothing 
at the mouth and breathing vengeance upon him. No one 
in the city knew better than the Examiner that Mr. Hunt- 
ington was beyond the limits of the State when the war- 
rant was sworn out, but the opportunity to make a little 
cheap notoriety, to pose as a champion of the people, so 
dear to that paper and so thoroughly understood and 
heartily despised by the community, could not escape 
them. The shallow bluff was characteristic of the fakir, 
and excited only the contempt of respectable citizens, 
who know the Examiner for the fraud it is. This sensa- 
tional grasp at notoriety by that paper was doubly despic- 
able because in its lying attempt to arrest Huntington it 
was cloaking itself behind the bereavement of a poor fam- 
ily and trading upon their affliction to gain the sympathy 
of the public and parade itself as the defender of their 
rights. It was but another attempt to cheat the com- 
munity, and was worthy of its managing editor, whose 
reputation for questionable transactions are well estab- 
lished in this city. A paper without character, a man- 
aging editor whose career has been a stench in the nos- 
trils of honest people, and a proprietor who is even now a 
cowardly fugitive from justice of his own State — the Exam- 
iner, Lawrence, and Hearst form a combination that is a 
notable example of unclean and disreputable methods. 

Dancinfj. A St. L"uis clergyman invites his congrega- 
tion to dance. He is right. Damnation by 
dancing is the dogma 01 the clumsy. A wingless angel 
has as much right to dance as a winged angel has to fly. 
There is no more sin in moving to lively sounds than there 
is in keeping step to a funeral march. The anti-dancer is 
jealous. He is ignored by society. He would be as much 
out of place in a ball room as Mr. Greenway would be in a 
treadmill. 

As to the immorality of dancing, there are two-legged 
animals whose imaginations cannot rise above a dung hill. 
The ball room has, to say the least, as fragrant a reputa- 
tion as the camp meeting. Society is the perfume of 
civilization. AVhy should music, rhythm and grace be de- 
basing? Sam Jones says "Dancing is hugging set to 
music." Sam Jones is a theological buzzard. He knows 
no more of refined society than an organ grinder knows of 
sheet music. His forte is slinging mud at targets above 
his reach. Awkwardness hates grace; the uninvited, the 
invited. A lovely girl swaying in unison with delicious 
music, is just as elevating as an old woman turning somer- 
saults and yelling "glory hallelujah." 



February 5, 189S. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




C 



CLUBDOM is rife wilh the report, whis- 
pered with bated breath, that a well- 
known Californian wa? actually, really and truly, black- 
balled at the last meeting of the aristocratic society to 
which he sought admission as a member. The why and 
the wherefore cannot be ascertained from the members of 
that particular club, who are as dumb as oysters, and the 
outside conclusion is that the San Franciscan, who was 
wealthy enough for all club purposes at home, was not so 
considered here. There are several social organizations 
in New York where millions are required to make even a 
Chesterfield eligible to membership. In all other respects 
the rejected applicant stands A. L. 

* * * 

Give a dog a bad name, and everybody is ready to give 
him a kick whenever he passes by. Years ago George 
Brotherton committed une petite indiscretion — Capt. Lees 
and George Hickox called it forgery — and went to San 
Quen tin for a term of years. There he saw the error of 
his ways, and when released came back to his Philadelphia 
home, determined to begin life anew under honest stars. 
Since then he has been engaged in theatrical and sporting 
ventures, and has pursued a "straight" course. Some 
weeks since he assisted in getting up a quasi-charity en- 
tertamment^-Cinderella. it didn't succeed, that was all, 
probably through too much or too bad management. 
There was no crookedness charged against anyone. A 
sleuth hound of the press, who "spaced" in San Francisco 
years ago, heard that Brotherton was connected with the 
enterprise, so his paper (it wasn't the Journal) had a 
scoop the next morning — the Brotherton incident in San 
Francisco being refurbished for the occasion with all its 

familiar features. 

* # * 

Society gathered at the Waldorf-Astoria on Thursday 
last to assist at a matinee for the benefit of the Fresh Air 
Fund, and society was shocked. They drew the line at the 
Baroness Blanc, who writes her own songs, and here are 
the words that offended the aristocratic audience: 

I am a widow, and I am very, very shy, 
And I very seldom raise my drooping eye, 
But if you'll come some day at three, 
And have a quiet cnp of tea, 
I'll let you be alone with me. 
But you must first to this agree: 
That you won't try to set me a pace, 
That you'll like just my silk, without lace, 
And if you will remain till nine 
I'll try and change the tea to wine, 
And when you leave you'll say: 
She is fine, this widow who is shy. 

The Baroness appears in widow's weeds, and while singing 
lifts her skirt pretty high and indulges in a series of kicks. 
Naughty ? Well, you mustn't be too particular when you 
draw upon the variety artistes for amusement. 

* * * 

There is presented at the Lyceum, under Dan Frob- 
man's management, a drama or society play, whatever you 
may wish to call it, which is so constructed that it com- 
mands success, without the special necessity of discussing 
the sex problem in its peculiar relations. Tlie Tree of 
Knowledge is the best thing the Lyceum people have had 
for some time, and as a result the theatre is enjoying a full 
run of prosperity. The characters are strongly drawn, 
and the company is equal to its demands. Still it is to be 
regretted that Miss Oppe, the Anglo-American, is not en- 
tirely au fait in the splendid role assigned her. Mrs. 
James Mannering Hackett has a congenial role, and hus- 
band James looks on from the wiugs and encourages his 

now-acknowledged wife. 

* * * 

Among the San Frauciscans at the hotels this week 
were J. S. Webster and E. L. Pillsbury at the Manhattan, 
James L. Flood, N. T. Messer, W. D. Wilson, M. C. Aus- 
bro, and A. C. Dunham at the Imperial; A. Bachman at 
Holland; C. F. Burnett and Martin Berwin at Hoffman. 



They do things differently on the other side, for it is re- 
corded that the good people of Llambisher, Radnorshire, 
Wales, being much scandalized by the living together of 
two unmarried people, of different sexes necessarily, 
organized themselves into a vigilance committee, black- 
ened their faces, and after a tin pan serenade of the 
offending couple, compelled them to wade in the river for 
twenty minutes in their night-clothes to cool their ardor, 
and capped the climax by cutting off the woman's hair, 
flogging both and turning them adrift in an adjoining field. 
The next morning the guilty ones bad disappeared. Such 
a remedy wouldn't work in town, but in the country it is 

different. 

# * * 

The dinner of the season was the one which Creighton 
Webb, one of the mature young bachelor leaders of New 
York society, who occasionally serves his country as Sec- 
retary of Legation at St. Petersburg, gave last week at 
the Waldorf-Astoria, in honor of Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. 
Baldwin (nie Hobart). The Astors and a fair representa- 
tion of the other up-to-date Seventy-Five-Four Hundred 
were present, but Mrs. Deacon was conspicuously absent. 
The round table was used for the thirty-four guests pres- 
ent, and after they had exchanged society lies, Webb led 
them in a dance that was quite as enjoyable as had been 
his repast. 

# # * 

Helen Gould, who, in conjunction with Brother George, 
runs the Gould estate, has returned from semi-seclusion at 
the Tarrytown country seat and opened her city residence 
(Anglice — town house) on Fifth avenue, and society is 
wondering what it means. It is likely that Miss Gould 
has heard of the carryings on between Brother Howard 
and Kate Clemmons, ex-actress, and she wants to keep 
an eye on them. There should be scandals in the home of 

the millionaires. 

# * # 

Charles L. Fair is spending a few weeks in country re- 
tirement for the benefit of his health, which at latest date 
was much improved. He is having plans prepared for a 
pleasure yacht, on the lines of his Pacific Coast launch, 
with which he expects to astonish the natives the coming 
summer. 

New York, January 31, 189S. Entre Nous. 



The first and only ale 
without sediment 

A bottle 

of 

Evans' Ale, 

like 

The Cup of True 

happiness, 

Has no dregs at 

the bottom. 

Truly a unifying force! 

SHERWOOD & SHERWOOD. 

Pacific Coast Agents 

San Francisco, Portland, Los Angeies 



nnrrki 128 O'Farrell street, 

DnDDIN r^*~\ It A Aun U^i~*4- n cor. Powell. Dealers 
C/Oal MerChantS io wood and charcoal, 
nnrsc Genuine Wellington 

DnUO. Coal a specialty. 

Orders promptly Delivered. Telephone Red 1581 




DR. 


cJAS. C. GILBE.RTSON. Dentist. 




819 Mabket Street, third floor, room E, San Francisco 




Hours : 9 u> 5, /n-*demy of Sciences Building. 



has no shading; it has connective 

L>ifltlt"Lin6 SllOrtllflntl is^mple, liable and^a'sTir'the 
** fastest. Full personal course, $25; 

by maU$».5; first-class references; descriptive '• Sketch " free. 
ROSCOE L EAMES, Room 556 Parrott Building; telephone Jessie 1011 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 5, 1898. 



s«re_s£ 



]H WIIUl U U' < I KJ \J U~ 




W$ £ hM^ T^ I were not surfeited to sickness with 
musical farce, I think I might easily 
wax enthusiastic over The Pearl of Pelein. 
It is not another Geisha, hut it is likely to 
repair the fortunes of the Tivoli, which 
have been rather on the droop since that 
record-breaker left its boards. If The Pearl of Pekin does 
not score a respectable run it will not be because it is not 
bright, and pretty, and fairly amusing, and staged with 
even more than the usual scenic elaboration, but because 
the town is in such urgent need of serious entertainment. 
Of course I do not reproach the Tivoli for playing musical 
farce, — that is its prerogative — but having had scarcely 
anything but light shows to go and see for weeks past, the 
proper value of the Tivoli unjustly declines. The people 
are jaded with laughter — the laughter described in the 
book of Ecclesiastes as "the crackling of thorns under a 
pot." Our natures are becoming warped by having the 
risible faculties so strained that they refuse to perform 
their normal functions, and an epidemic of melancholia 
will be the inevitable reaction. A cant idea prevails 
among the mass of lay theatre-goers that farcical fun is 
what their souls require for their evening diversion, — 
show after show comes labeled with that horrible phrase, 
"It is to laugh," echoed by press agents and re-echoed by 
reviewers, — but they misunderstand their own needs if 
they fail to see that it is only by judicious contrast that 
their lives can ever become truly artistic and dramatic. 
Life is so full of humor that one needs tragic relief at the 
theatres in order to preserve a sane mental poise. Only 
after an unhealthy indulgence in the joys of sorrow can 
one fully appreciate frivolity. It takes a man with a 
streak of morbidity in his temperament to scale the most 
exquisite heights of folly. By pursuing any emotion too 
persistently one experiences only boredom and stagnation. 
Of course we are bound to have a reaction here as every- 
where else, — the history of the stage is a series of re- 
actions, each worn to death in its turn. The lewd farces 
of the Restoration were the inevitable result of the long 
suppression of mirth by the Puritans, just as to-day the 
revival of the romantic historical drama of no psychology 
is the result of an overdose of the lurid lady with a past. 
We may soon expect, then, that the San Francisco public 
will have nothing but crimson problem plays and purple 
Tschaikowsky symphonies. Instead of banishing <»»«/, in 
rational manner, with a pleasurable blend of groans and 
laughter, we shall fly to the other extreme uniil tragedy 
has no more power to thrill us than the crude exaggera- 
tions of a daily reporter. 

* * * 

But to return to The Pearl of Pekin. Surveying it in 
an unprejudiced attitude, which I can only attain after a 
severe mental wrench, I perceive there is much to delight. 
Of course there is no consistent attempt at local color 
either in the music or the acting, but to expect this would 
be to ask Tin Pearl of Pekin to conform to a standard 
which is never aimed at by pieces of its class. I will not 
weary myself by giving a narration of the story, for those 
who do not go to see it will not want it, and those who do 
go to see it will not want it either. The story is coherent, 
and the music by Charles Lecocq, with interpolations by 
G. A. Kerker and other people, is generally attractive, 
and especially so in the first act, in which there are fewer 
interpolations. There is a song written bv Mr. Edgar 
Kelley and sung very prettily by Miss Florence Wolcott in 
the third act, which is worthy of special mention. It is 
graceful and characteristic, and the use of that harrowing 
instrument, the mandolin, in the accompaniment produces 
a more agreeable effect than usual. Thescenerv is painted 
in Mr. Oscar L. Fest's best manner,— Mr. Fest is all right 
until he depicts the human or domestic animal. 

The Tivoli company tits the piece admirably for the most 
part. Miss Wolcott, as the Pearl, vocally the most im- 
portant person in the cast, did not do herself justice on 



Monday night until her song In the third act; her voice 
did not come out nearly as well as usual, though the part 
seems particularly well suited to her, with plenty of O 
Mimosa San business; she was palpably suffering from an 
attack of first-night nerves, and is no doubt herself again 
by this time. Miss Hall caused me disappointment be- 
cause she has what I should have considered her best fit- 
ting part since she came here. She is delightfully pictur- 
esque in both her costumes, but her acting is too brusque, 
and especially does her voice need modulation, she pitches 
it in the monotonous shout which distinguishes the ladies 
of the variety halls. Mr. Edwin Stevens, who as Tyfoo, 
the Mandarin, has the lion's part, is as usual amazingly 
unequal. He has some genuinely comic inspirations, and 
he has other inspirations which are tiresome, and does not 
seem to have the faculty of choosing the good and leaving 
the bad. His audience does not choose for him either, for 
his immense popularity carries him victoriously through 
every vicissitude. His drunken scene is one of the most 
pointless bits of business I ever saw. In his clear enuncia- 
tion of his songs he sets an example which several mem- 
bers of the Tivoli company would do well to follow. Mr. 
Leary has never done anything to make me forget how 
clever was his Wun-Hi in The Geisha. Mr. Phil Branson 
does very well with the French sailor, and the chorus is 
cheerful and industrious as usual, and does much effective 
singing and dancing and general chorus business. A 
pleasing diversion is the "Chin-Chin" quartette, sung by 
the Misses Cooper, Stockmeyer, Gray and Davis. In this 
Miss Georgie Cooper developed unexpectedly into a 
comedienne, at first I thought accidentally, but anyway 
successfully, so I will compliment her on humorous per- 
ception. 

* * *■ 

A good melodramatic situation at the end of the second 
act of Victor Durand does something to redeem the false- 
ness and heaviness and dull dialogue of the rest of the play, 
and that which does most to redeem the Alcazar com- 
pany's performance of it is Miss Gertrude Foster's clever 
acting. I have several times called attention to Miss Fos- 
ter's performances, because I observe that she possesses 
the real histrionic temperament to a remarkable degree. 
She is still improving, and especially in the control of her 
voice, — which is naturally neither strong nor musical — has 
much to improve. In the strong scene of the second act 
she displays much emotional power and steers herself dis- 
creetly through the difficulties of the third. Mr. William 
H. Pascoe, specially engaged for this week, plays the vil- 
lain in a straightforward, melodramatic fashion, which is 
the only way to play such a part. Mr. Frederick Pauld- 
ing and Mr. Charles Bryant are the best of the minors. 
All the rest leave more to be desired than I have space to 

detail. 

* # * 

Gautier, who does the novel and exhilarating equestrian 
act at the Orpheum this week, no doubt styles himself 
" The Great" in order to distinguish himself from his coun- 
tryman of the same name who is not quite unknown to 
fame, — though of a different kind. " The Great " Gautier, 
with perfect grace and sureness, keeps his spirited steed 
dancing round on a small circular platform for about fifteen 
minutes; it is the most breath-holding act since wonderful 
Adgie danced among her lions. The performance of the 
Brothers Damm is something out of the ordinary in acro- 
batics; they are marvels of agility. The Nawns were here 
not long ago doing the same act, — at least Mr. Nawn was, 
but it seems to me that this is a different Mrs. Nawn, — or 
should I say Miss Nawn ? Next week there will also be 
"The Great" Clivette, assisted by Mdlle. Clivette, in an 
entertainment of magic; the Gloss Brothers, "gladiatorial 
gymnasts," Adelman&Lowe, "refined musical specialists," 
and some performing dogs. 

* # * 

Herr Anton Schott presented another interesting pro- 
gramme to a good-sized audience at the Y. M. C. A. Audi- 
torium Hall on Friday evening of last week, at the third 
of his six recitals. Herr Schott is giving the public a 
valuable opportunity to hear songs by the best German 
composers, especially valuable as most of the local vocal- 
ists show so little enterprise in their selections and keep 
on repeating Massenet's '■' Elegy " and the IPagliacci pro- 



Febiuary 5, 1898. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



lo£ue, and other well-known songs. Miss Voltz assisted 
Herr Schott, and sang with taste, though her voice is not 
very agreeable in quality, and Mr. Arthur Fickensher ac- 
companied with his usual discretion. 

Mr. Harry Corson Clark will be seen in What Happened 
to Jonet, as soon as the Columbia Theatre is ready for occu- 
pancy. 

The Cirl From Paris will continue at the Baldwin for 
one week more, and then the Bostonians in The Serenade™. 

The programme for the next symphony concert has been 
changed. Beethoven's ''Eroica" symphony (No. 3) will 
be played instead of the Brahms No. 2. The other num- 
bers are those already announced. 

On Monday evening Charley's Aunt will be produced at 
the Alcazar. The performance on Tuesday evening is for 
the benefit of Mr. Frederick Belasco. 

The Pear! of PeJcin is on for a run at the Tivoli. 



SHake Into Your Shoes 



DEPUTY SURVEYOR OF CUSTOMS. 




Chauncey M. St John. 



THE appointment of Mr. Chauncey M. St. John to the 
position of Deputy Surveyor of Customs at this port 
by Mr. Spear, has been received by his party and by the 

public generally as a fitting 
recognition of his admir- 
able qualifications for the 
place, and a proper 
acknowledgment of his ser- 
vices to the political organ- 
ization of which he is a 
prominent member. 

Mr. St. John was born in 
New York in 1859, and 
came to this State when he 
was a mere boy. After 
preparing for Yale he 
studied law, and at the age 
of 22 years secured an ap- 
pointment with Collector 
of the Port Eugene L. 
Sullivan as official meas- 
urer of vessels, in which 
position he has gained the 
commendation and respect 
of all with whom he has 
been officially, or other- 
wise, brought into contact. 
He has been prominently connected with the social life of 
the city, and has as well developed a considerable scien- 
tific knowledge of astronomy. He is an active member of 
the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, of which he is at 
present a Director and Third Vice-President. He was 
one of the organizers of the Naval Battalion, and per- 
formed practical service in directing operations at the 
Oakland Mole during the strike of 1894. 

Mr. St. John comes of good stock. His great-great-grand- 
mother was a daughter of General Champion, of Revolu- 
tionary fame. She married Sidney Fitzgerald. Aaron 
Burr was made the guardian of Miss Fitzgerald, who be- 
came the wife of Wm. P. Whaites, whose father, Joshua 
Whaites, was a partner of the original John Jacob Astor 
in the manufacture of organs in London. 

The Deputy Surveyor is directly descended from Matthes 
St. John, who settled in Connecticut in 1632. The family 
were prominent in the political and social life of that time, 
and their name figures frequently in the honorable records 
of the colonial and revolutionary wars through which the 
country subsequently passed. 

Mr. St. John is a warm personal friend of Surveyor of 
the Port Spear. His nomination was made by telegraph 
by Mr. Spear, and confirmation followed the next day — a 
great compliment to him. He holds personal letters from 
President McKinley, in which his services to the party 
are warmly recognized. He is a prominent member of the 
California Society of the Sons of the American Revolution, 
and a man of sterling integrity and ability. 

Have you seen the stunning neckwear for gentlemen just ar- 
rived at Carmany's, 25 Kearny street? 

Fink Watch and Jewelry Repairing. Low prices. All work guaran- 
teed. J.N Brittain. watchmaker and jeweler, 20 Geary street. 



Allen's Foot-Ease, a Powder for the 
feet. It cures painful, swollen, smartiDg feet, and Instantly takes the 
sting out of corns and bunions. It's the greatest comfort disoovery of the 
age. Allen's Foot-Ease makes tight fitting or new shoes feel easy. It Is 
a certain cure for sweating, callous, and hot, tired, aching feet. Try it 
to-day. Sold by all druggists and shoe stores. By mail for 25c. in stamps. 
Trial package FREE. Address, Allen S. Olmsted, Le Roy, N. Y. 



Baldwin Theatre 



Friedlander, Gottlob & Co., 

Lessees and Managers. 



To-night, Sunday night, and all next week. Last performances 
of Edward E. Rice's superb speotaole, 

THE GIRL FROM PARIS. 

Tne top notcher of sucoesses. 

Monday, *eb. 14th— The famous, original BOSTONIANS. 

rr-' , I ' r\ 1—1 MRS. ERNESTINE KEELING, 

I \VO\\ UDSra llOUSe. Proprietor and Manager 

Our latest triumph. The merry operatic fan- 

PEARL OF PEKIN. 



Every evening, 
tasie, 



THE 

A great cast, including; Edwin Stevens, Phil Branson, Thomas 
C. Leary, Ar Boyce.Fred Kavanah, Florence Wolcott, Georgia 
Cooper, Jennie Stockmeyer, Edith Hall, Graoie Gray, Hannah 
Davis, etc. Song, dance, humor, ballet. 
Next opera, Said Pasha. 
Box office always open. 
Popular Prices 25cand50o 

Tivoli Opera House. — Extra 

Thursday afternoon, February 10th, at 3 :15 o'clock. Sixth concert 

SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY SOCIETY 

FRITZ SGHEEL, musical direotor. 

Programme: Overture, Peace Jubilee. Carl Reinecke; Sym- 
phony No 3 Heroic, Beethoven; Entrance of the Gods in Wall- 
halla (Rheingold), Johannes Brahms; Symphonic Poem, The 
Preludes (after Lamartine), Franz Liszt. 

Prices, including reserved seats, $1.50, $1, and 75c. Seats on 
sale at Tivoli, commencing Monday, February 7th, 

/**\ i San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall. O'Farrell 

\J rP neU m . street, between Stockton and Powells treeta . 

Week commencing Monday, February 7th. 

THE GREAT OLIVETTE, 

Assisted by Mile. Clivette, producing phenomenal silhouettes 
digitaris ; 16 Fille's Dogs , the best canine performance in Amer- 
ica; Gloss Brothers, gladiatorial gymnasts; Adelman & Lowe, 
musical specialists; The Great Gautier, the most sensational 
horseback act in the world; Brothers Damm, eccentric acrobats ; 
. the Nawns, Irish comedians; American Biograph, new life 
scenes. 

Reserved seats, 25c; balcony, 10c; opera chairs and box seats, 
50c; Matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday. Matinee 
Prices: Parquet, any seat, 25c; balcony, any seat, 10c; chil- 
dren, 10c, any part. 

r» I T*L i Fred Belasco, Lessee. 

MlCaZar I heaure. Mark Thall, Manager. PhoneMain254. 

Week of February 7th. Matinee Saturday. 

CHARLEY'S AUNT, 

" Will make a cat laugh." 

Never before at our prices. 15c, 25c, 35c, 50c, reserved. 

Note— In preparation, another great treat. 



Mech 



anics 



Patf 



Southwest corner 
I I IOn. Larkin and Grove 



MINING 



FAIR 

AND KLONDIKE EXPOSITION. 

Opens Saturday evening, January 39th, 7;30 o'clock. Continuing 
five weeks. Special opening ceremonies. Fair machinery 
started by President MoKinley from Washington. Grand, 
beautiful pageant, Music by Director Rogers and Bennett's 
band of 35 musicians. EverjthlDg in perfect working order. 
See the North Bloomfield Mine: the underground mine and tun- 
nel; free moving pictures, Alaska views; two hundred exhibits. 
Admisiion 25 cents; children 15 cents. Tickets on sale Satur- 
day, all day. 

Pacific Goast dockey Glub tmgieside Track). 



Racing from Monday, 
5th, inclusive, 



January 22d, to Saturday, February 



FIUE OR MORE RAGES DAILY, 

Raisorshine. First race at 2 p. m. S. P R. R. trains 12:45 and 
1 :15 p. m daily. Leave Third street station, stopping at Valen- 
cia street. Returning immediately after the races. Electric 
car lines — Kearny street and Mission street cars every three 
minutes, direct to track, without change. Fillmore-St. cars 
transfer each way. 
F. H. Green, Secretary. S.N. Androus, President. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 5, 1898. 




IT is generally understood 
that San Francisco is 
somewhat liberal in its interpretation of what may be con- 
sidered the conventionalities of life. We are decidedly not 
conventional — and yet there is an element in society who 
are ever ready to denounce others whom they consider to 
have overstepped the bounds and are quite eager to point 
the approving ringer at themselves. Among these people, 
who prate for ever and a day that it is not right to know 
this person or that person because they have not followed 
closely the narrow path of right, are those who think it 
quite the correct thing to let tueir daughters with a giddy 
chaperon sleep the night in a Fraternity house at Berkeley. 
The raw youths who "bach" there, give up their bed- 
rooms to the young women and their solitary chaperon and 
bunk it out in the living rooms. It may be also said that 
sleep is not sought till late in the dawning hours, and 
that " beer busts" generally precede the retirement. A 
pretty kind of thing this is to be sure. Four or five girls 
with a young chaperon spending the night in a house occu- 
pied by bachelors, and spending the hours previous to bed 
going howling in awful chorus college songs, drinking beer 
and having "a jolly good time." It smacks somewhat of 
the orgies that may be seen in any dive after midnight — 
and yet these people are forever saying it is necessary to 
draw the line somewhere. It is necessary, and the "line 
should be sharply drawn across their society. 

* * * 

The young men who do society in the role of beaux are 
to be much admired for their entire neglect of that all- 
important requisite— respect. It seems to be the proper 
thing nowadays for these gilded butterflies, who do duty 
during the day as clerks, to relinquish all symptoms of 
slavish respect. In working hours they act as gentlemen 
of limited means who have superiors, but when night falls 
they are the Lords of Creation. When they are asked to 
do anything they " invariably " refuse if it is not to their 
liking, and their behavior in drawing rooms would lead one 
to suppose that their bringing-up had been in some stable. 
One young insurance clerk, whose father had long been in 
the army, is noted for his supreme indifference to what 
may be considered "gentlemanly." It is a pity that some 
well-meaning person does not catch him by the coat collar 
and proceed to mend nil his manners. He is certainlv in 
need of it. 

* » * 

It is most pleasing to our amour propre that we can 
cause the eyes of a Bostonian, who is of the bluest of the 
blue blooded in that most aristocratic city, to snap with 
wonder. A certain Mr. Cram, an engineer and architect 
of much repute, recently passed through this citven route 
for Japan, where he is to construct some buildings of sur- 
passing beauty. He brought letters to that admirable 
host, Mr. Porter Garnett, of the mint, who introduced him 
to the select dainties of a still more select Italian restau- 
rant. Then he met Mr. Willis, who showed him much at- 
tention ana who secured letters for him from Mr. Irving 
M. Scott. Mr. Cram is enthusiastic over San Francisco. 
He declared that we have several small Europes in our 
borders, and for hospitality we have not our equal. This 
is most pleasing. Mr. Cram, who is no end of a swell, says 
he intends to return to us and give us some more of Bos- 
ton before he goes back to the Bao'< Bay district. 
* * # 

There is a sort of breezy whisper going round the Swim 
that the handsome widow, whose aureole of white hair 
only makes the still youthful face it surrounds vet more 
attractive, is meditating a second "try" in matrimonial 
life. People who profess to know say that the daughter 
fancied she was the inducement for the frequent visits of 
the man from abroad, and great is her chagrin at recent 
unmistakable proof of his preference for her mother. If 
an outsider might be permitted to hazard a remark on the 
subject, we should say with the Irishman "small blame to 
nim for that same." 



A very dearmotherof a very interesting braceof daugh- 
ters is oft victimized by her very animate offspring. An 
individual whose identity is well-established by being the 
close friend of a gentleman whose allowance of whiskey is 
limited to some sixty drinks a day, and who has a weak- 
ness for whiskey poker, is also a friend of this family. He 
introduced into this house the game of whiskey poker, but 
concealed it under the name of "Bumps." The mater 
familias was delighted with the game. She was visiting a 
friend's house not long since, when she exclaimed, " I have 
a new game." "Whatisit?" "Bumps." " Show it to 
us." She did, and the head of the family, an old sinner, 
called out with a roar of laughter, "Why, that's whiskey 
poker." A cold reception is now awaiting that enterpris- 
ing voung man. 

* * * 

There is a certain young and very beautiful woman, or 
rather young lady, in Oakland, who was married during 
the course of the week, who believes in the constancy of 
man and the inevitable. She had her portraits taken in 
several styles and then gave them away, not signed by 
her maiden name, but by the name she was to bear when 
her name was changed by the decrees of the church and of 
the law. Oakland is singular in most things, but when her 
fair daughters have so much of belief that nothing will 
change when once promised, then indeed they are to be 
called blessed — but still young girls should not sign the 
name of their future husband before their own until it is 

un fait accompli. 

* * # 

The friends of Mr. de la Montanya are more than de- 
lighted that there is every prospect of a reconciliation be- 
tween the husband and wife. It may be remembered that 
Montanya went to France and had himself made a citizen 
of that country, and secured the control of the two chil- 
dren. Now he is back, and as Mr. Montanya has been 
seen with his wife, there is every good hope that they will 
soon be again together. 

CERTAIN CURE ">« INDIGESTION, 

DR. PAGF.T, the famous English practitioner, says tbe only cure as 
well as preventative for dyspepsia Is: 

" 1st— Eat slowly. 

'•2nd— Drink weak whisky and water with your meals. The White 
Horse Crcrxiri— bottled in Scotland— is in my opinion the best for purity 
and age. 

"3rd— Give over drinking tea with butcher meat; it Is a certain source of 
indigestion, and so are cheap wines and spirits. 

'■nh— Rest half-an-bour after eating, and take plenty of exercise in the 
cool of the day; and, bar accident, one may live to a mellow old age." 

Direct from distillers Always the same W Thf* (~*\\A H]e»r\A 
pure, mellow, matured Scotch malt. 7256 * l vc V-/IU DlCI VU. 

Sold by all respectable dealers. 
Being a high-priced whisky, manv don't 
keep it If they can sell another brand, 
therefore Insist on getting it. 



MACKIE <£ COY. DISTILLERS, LTD. 

Islay. Glenlivet, and Glasgow, 

CHARLES MEINECKE 
3U Sacramento St., S. F 




CO, 



Whisky 

f^ Horse 

W '(EILAR 

l" r«on ths 

6 ReciDC 

Agents. 



|R T. FELIX GOURAUDS ORIENTAL 
' CREAM, OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER. 

Removes Tan, Pimples. Freckles, Moth 
Patches, Rash, and Skin Diseases, and 
every blemish on beauty, and defies de- 
tection It has stood the test of 48 years 
and ia so harmless we taste It to be sure 
it Is properly made Accept no counter- 
feit of similar name. Dr. L. A. Sayre 
said tu a lady of the haut-ton (a pa- 
tient): As you ladies will use them, I 
reommend 'Gouraud's Cream' as the 
least harmful of all the Skin prepara- 
tions." For sale by all Dmgglstsand 
Fancy-Goods Dealers In tbe United 
States. Canadas, and Europe. 




FERD. T. HOPKINS, Prop'r, 

37 Great Jones St., N. Y. 



DR. CHRISTENSEN, Dentist, 

Has removed to 2720 Mission street, between Twenty-third and 
Twenty-fourth Four specialists in attendance. 
Phone— Mission 160. 



February 5, 1898. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




John L. Stoddard's Lectures: Illustrated and embellished with views 
of the world's famous places and people, being the identical dis- 
courses delivered during the past eighteen years under the title 
of the Stoddard Lectures. Volume I. Published by Belford. 
Middlebrook & Co., New York, Chicago, and London. 1897. 

The volume before us, the first of a series of ten, con- 
tains the lectures on Norway, Switzerland, Athens, and 
Venice. It is printed upon thick, high-surfaced, paper, 
and has upon every page one or more photogravures, re- 
producing some beautiful scene in Switzerland or Norway, 
or some marvel of Athenian or Venetian genius. The 
text is written in an entertaining and lively style, free 
from the merely statistical information that is dispensed 
so abundantly by many lecturers, and is forgotten almost 
before it is heard. Mr. Stoddard has an agreeable descrip- 
tive style, sometimes, perhaps, rather heavily embroid- 
ered with picturesque phrase and brilliant metaphor, but 
clear and flowing. Allowance must be made for the fact 
that a lecture, like a speech, is intended primarily to be 
heard, and not to be read; and the speaker may indulge 
in rhetorical outbursts, which, when coldly set down in 
print, appear rather showy and high-flown. Besides this, 
audiences in this country are accustomed to glowing de- 
scription, and expect it from public speakers, preachers, 
and lecturers. In his lecture on Athens, Mr. Stoddard 
dwells on the vast and undying influence exercised upon 
the world by Athenian literature and art, and refers at 
considerable length to the revival of the Olympic games 
at Athens, and to the victories of the American athletes 
there. His lecture on Switzerland is full of interesting 
matter, but familiar as he evidently is with that moun- 
tainous country, he does not seem to be a mountaineer, 
but prefers to do his mountain-climbing with a telescope. 
He expresses wonder that mountain-climbers can spend 
a night at the Grands Mulets, on Mt. Blanc, at an eleva- 
tion of ten thousand feet above sea-level, in cabins provided 
for their shelter and comfort. Yet every summer some 
dozens of people sleep at just that elevation at Camp 
Muir, on Mt. Rainier, in the open air on a ledge of rock 
and gravel. Nor, though he must have seen many glaciers, 
does he appear to have devoted any pains to their study, 
for in speaking of them, he several times uses the inaccu- 
rate terms 'frozen streams," "icy flood," or "frozen 
river." But things of this kind do not seriously impair 
the interest or value of Mr. Stoddard's lectures or mar 
the enjoyment of the ordinary reader. We have read the 
four lectures in this volume with much pleasure, and look 
forward to the publication of the other volumes of the 
series. The typography leaves nothing to be desired, and 
the photogravures are among the best that we have ever 
seen in the pages of a book. The ten volumes, when com- 
pleted, will form a record of wide and intelligent travel of 
which Mr. Stoddard may well be proud. 

In the Shadow of the Pyramids, a novel, by Richard Henry Savage. 
Published by Rand, McNallv & Co., Chicago and New Yirk. 
■ 1898. 

At the close of the Civil War in the United States, some 
forty American military officers, chiefly Southerners, en- 
tered the service of Ismail Pasha, the Khedive of Egypt. 
One of the most talented of these officers was Lieutenant- 
General C. P. Stone, whose military secretary was Major 
R. H. Savage, the author of this story. After twenty 
years of reckless extravagance and luxury, in which he is 
said to have spent five hundred millions, Ismail was forced 
by Great Britain to abdicate. "In the shadow of the 
Pyramids" deals with the closing days of Ismail's reign, 
and is full of plots, intrigues, diplomacy, and romantic love 
episodes, narrated in the well-known manner of the author 
of "Prince Schamyl's Wooing," and nearly a score of 
other exciting stories. It is sold in paper covers at fifty 
cents, and in cloth with gilt top ana rough edges at one 
dollar. 



B. O. Flower, who formerly edited that sensational 
periodical, The Arena, is now editing a monthly called The 
New Time. The first article in a recent issue was written 
by Justice Walter C'.ark, of the Supreme Bench of North 
Carolina, a gentleman whose loose and disingenious reason- 
ing about economic matters we had occasion to comment 
on when he was publishing an account of his travels through 
Mexico in The Arena. Copying the words of another equally 
sensational, though much abler writer — Mr. W. T. Stead- 
Mr. Justice Clark entitles his article, "If Christ should 
come to-day: who would receive him, and who would cru- 
cify him ? " He asserts that the millionaires and follow- 
ers of Mammon of to-day would crucify Christ just as the 
Jews crucified him nineteen centuries ago. That great 
fortunes are not accumulated by strict adherence to altru- 
istic principles, and that Christ's teaching would be as un- 
welcome to the rich men of to-day as it was to the rich 
men of Christ's day, we are quite ready to allow; but then 
we must also remember that the shrewdest, hardest, keen- 
est money-getters are quite frequently professors of the 
most strictly orthodox Christianity. Men like R. D. Rocke- 
feller and Andrew Carnegie crush their commercial rivals 
and grind the faces of their employees, all the while occu- 
pying their church pews regularly every Sunday. That 
their daily practice is utterly inconsistent with their re- 
ligious beliefs probably never enters their heads: that their 
whole course of conduct is utterly unworthy, not merely 
of a Christian, but of an honorable pagan, never for a 
moment occurs to them. They rob by the grace of God for 
six days of the week, and on the seventh thank the Al- 
mighty for his mercies — and invite the parson to dinner. 

Travel, an illustrated monthly edited by E. H. Talbot, 
and published at Chicago, is devoted exclusively to 
travel and railroad matters. The last issue that reached 
us has an article on "The German Side of Saxony," by 
Miss Grace H. Webb, and a short account of a visit to 
Mexico, by Elizabeth D. Preston; but the piece de resist-: 
ance is an exhaustive account of Indianapolis, the Hoosier 
capital, copiously illustrated with photo-engravings of 
public buildings, streets, and schools, portraits of James 
Whitcomb Riley, Benjamin Harrison, Lew Wallace, and 
oiher local celebrities, also with reproductions of pictures 
and statues by Indianapolis artists. A curious claim made 
on behalf of the town is that it is the "largest inland city 
in the world." But are not Paris, Lyons, Madrid, Berlin, 
Moscow, Vienna, Nijni Novgorod, Pekin, and many others, 
"inland cities," with populations far exceeding that of 
Indianapolis ? Birmingham is in the very center of Engr 
land, and has a population of about 500,000, or three times 
that of "the Hoosier capital." That Indianapolis is in 
some respects the most wonderful spot on the globe we 
are quite ready to believe, but we are unable to bring 
home to our mind the conviction that it is the "largest 
inland city in the world." 

The following remarks on French married life are from 
a most interesting article entitled "French Wives and 
Mothers," contributed by Anna L. Bicknell to a recent 
issue of The Century. " No matter how her matrimonial 
life may turn out, the Frenchwoman of the present day 
never complains, and never admits strangers, or even 
acquaintances, into her domestic troubles. On the con- 
trary, she takes a sort of pride in describing everything 
about her as particularly delightful: above all, she never 
complains of her husband, so long as she lives with him, 
whatever he may do. When at last some scandalous 
affair, which cannot be concealed, takes place, the public 
discovers with amazement that the affectionate couple 
hated each other: that the fathers- and mothers-in-law, 
always talked of as perfections and treasures, were intol- 
erable plagues and made endless mischief: that the charm- 
ing sons and daughters, so exceptionally gifted, gave 
great trouble in various ways: that the delightful home 
was a place of torture." 

The Honorable Frances Wolseley, only daughter of Lord 
Wolseley, the commander-in-chief of the British army, has 
written' "The Story of Marlborough," which is to be illus- 
trated by Caran d'Acbe, a French artist, who has hitherto 
been known as a caricaturist, but is also an excellent 
draughtsman of military life. Caran d' Ache's grandfather 
was an officer under the great Napoleon, and he has him- 
self served in the French army. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 5, 1898. 



"IRIS BLflMC." 



T BEY had been married l>ut six months when Tom 
Sutherland made his flying trip to Japan. Vernam, 
Vevey<S Co.'s Yokohama representative was muddling 
and needed "pulling up." 

Midst the picturesque disorder of half-packed boxes 
and portmanteaus, upset drawers and trays, Tom clasped 
Marion to his heart. 

"Courage, Iilue Eyes; be a brave little woman; I shall 
think of you every second of the time. Marie will take 
care of you; in Joseph you have a model butler 
and purveyor— don't lift that hat box, dearie, it's too 
heavy for you. Oh, yes, the case of irii blanc, your oon 
,,,„„/,, gift— how sweet of you! Yes, dearest, we'll put it 
in here, nexi to my handkerchiefs. 'Oh, the iru blanc, it 
Is so faint and it smells so sweet! Oh, the faint, sweet 
smell of the iru blancV Owen Meredith revised, my dear, 
to apply to your favorite perfume, the only perfume in 
the world for me, the perfume I shall always associate 
with vour dear, sweet self. What's this? Your robe a\ 
unit to wrap around it? What a delicate bit of sentiment, 
worthy of a young French bride! Hut it is one of the 
Maison Blanc' set, too costly and fine a piece of lingerie to 
go trotting around the globe with me." 

"Take it," sobbed Marion, clinging to his neck; "it will 
keep you from temptation, and be as a guardian angel 
hovering o'er you." 

So Tom Sutherland kissed his little wife a last fond fare- 
well, and went steaming for the Land of the Rising Sun. 
* * » » * 

Arrived iu Yokohama, Tom went over Hawker's books 
and accounts. 

Hawker had "loaded up" with more tea and silk than 
the western market warranted. This tea and silk had to 
be "readjusted," which was done greatly to Tom's credit. 

Hawker was threatened with the Keeley cure (be 
aluable a man to discharge), and told to brace up for 
a raise in salary. 

Tom had been away six weeks, during which time he and 
Marion had carried on a cablegram correspondence cost- 
ing hundreds. The iritblanc had been used conscientiously, 
Marion's robi dt nuit treasured sacredly, and fascinated 
bj its fairy tiluiincss and spotless purity, Tom had been 
able to resist the worthy Hawker's pressing invitations to 
"see the town" and make the acquaintance of the charm- 
ing Geisha girls. 

Worn out with fatigue aud sleepless nights, Tom ar- 
rived in New York Sunday morning at the unearthly hour 
of 4. His first impulse was to go galloping heme as fast 
as a hansom could travel, but recollecting that the house 
would be chain-locked and the servants asleep at that hour 
he decided that a Turkish bath would be first in order, and 
drove to a hotel. After his bath Tom was 
ushered into a room on the second floor: 

it was one of the bridal chambers of the house, and had 
the appearance of having been but lately vacated and 
hastily made up. A few hairpins lay on the dresser be- 
side the combing of a woman's hair. The bed was care- 
lessly done, the dent of a chambermaid's hasty slap was 
still visihie on the pillows. 

" Early birds!" laughed Tom. "Say. 'Front,' is this the 
only room you can give me? It doesn't look neat." 

" House lull, sir, answered the boy. "Parties in 'ere 
onlv left an hour ago.'' 

"Well, this will do for an hour's rest— call meat 7 
sharp." 

"Now, if Marion were only here' Only in dreams. 
darling, only in dreams have I seen thee — and if that boy 
fails to call me I mav dream here all day. Hello' What's 
this?" 

He had been slowly disrobing, and now, half clad, had 
pulled the bed clothes down, and was about to throw him- 
self on the bed. "What's this?" he repeated, picking up a 
crumpled piece of linen — "a night-shirt— er — a woman's' 
I beg the lady's pard.'n. '■• ./. unit, one confection — 

for it is as dainty as one of Marion's. And initials em- 
broidered in gold! — 'M. G. S.' 'M. G. S.?'— that's funny; 
same initials as Mario:: - M. G. S.. eh? Let me think.'' 



he added, slowly, with quivering nostrils, "let me — my 
God!" he cried, a sickening suspicion taking sudden hold 
of him — "iris blanc, irii blanc!" 

He staggered back from the bed, a deathly chill in his 
heart. 

"Iris blanc!" His nostrils dilated with a sudden horror. 

"Irii blanc!" The atmosphere grew heavy and stifling. 
"/n's \ blanc!" he screamed — "By God, there is no other 
perfume I know so well — 'tis hers! Yes, this is one of the 
Maison Blanc set; this is her gown beyond the peradven- 
ture of a doubt — here in a public place — hotel — bed — boy's 
remark, 'parties left;' there were two! I shall go mad if I 
stay here a moment longer! Her hair; the combing yon- 
der are the same color — and the hairpins? — yes, she wears 
hairpins like these. Oh, this is horrible, horrible! Faith- 
less — and married but six months! O heaven, why did I 
ever trust her out of my sight! — Damn Hawker, damn 
business! Deceived, deceived; cheated and fooled — dis- 
honored!" And the frantic husband fell sobbing across 
the bed. 

Who could the man be? was the thought that now 
racked his maddened brain as he tossed about in agony. 

He sprang to his feet with a fearful oath, teeth set and 
lips compressed, his face livid with hate and rage, a fierce 
light in his eyes, and in his heart the lust to kill. 

"Call a cab," he cried, to the startled bell-boy who 
answered his ring. With the evidence of his wife's guilt 
thrust in the pocket of his traveling ulster he sprang into 
the waiting hansom and ordered the man to drive for his 
life. During that memorable ride one hand clutched the 
tell-tale robi il> nuit, the other fingered nervously the 
stock of his revolver. Once he made up his mind to shoot 
himself and be driven up to home and faithless wife a 
corpse; but no, he would kill them both first and be driven 
away — a corpse. 

Joseph was so shocked by Mr. Sutherland's wild and 
hagged appearance that he could hardly gasp an answer 
to the fierce query 

" Where is your mistress?" 

"Mrs. Sutherland, aw, yes, sir," he stammered, "Mrs. 
Sutherland is in the library above." 

What was she doing up at that early hour? Tom dashed 
by the servant and ran up the stairs. Marion had heard 
his voice and with aery of joy ran to meet him on the 
landing. She threw herself at him with outstretched 
arms. He seized her by the wrists and dragged her into 
the light of the library. 

" Who is your lover and where is he hidden? Speak, 
you she devil," he hissed. 

"Tom, Tom, have you gone mad?" she cried. 
Yes, mad — mad with the lust to kill; mad to avenge 
my dishonor. Where is your lover? Speak!" 

" For the love of God, Tom, dear, be calm— just for a 
moment — and tell me what has happened." 

"Happened!" he roared. "Do you think to hoodwink 
me with cablegrams of undying affection, cablegrams at 
fifty dollars the message? Who is your paramour and 
where did he go after you left the hotel this morning?" 

Poor little Marion had fainted. 

He did not ling for her maid, but finding salts ou a table 
set about resuscitating the unconscious woman himself. 

" She must divulge his name," hemuttered hoarsely. 

She opened her eyes and commenced to sob hysterically. 
"What have I done? what have I done?" she moaned. "Is 
it all a horrid dream? Tom, dear, tell me, tell me. what 
has happened?" 

His name!" repeated Tom coldly. 

Again Mrs. Sutherland's hysteria seized her, and she 
could make no reply. 

There was a knock at the door. 

"What is it?" thundered Tom, pausing in his mad 
tram])- tramp from one end of the room to the other. 

"A gentleman to see Mrs. Sutherland, the gent " 

" Ha! now I shall learn the truth. I shall force it from 
his throat, tear it out with his tongue," and Tom Suther- 
land was flying down the staircase three steps at a bound. 

A tall, broad shouldered man, with a piratical black 
moustache, stood near the fireplace. He was smoothing 
his silk hat when Tom dashed in upon him. With a rapid 
double movement Tom covered the stranger with his re- 
volver and waved the robi >l< nuit before him. 

"You infernal scoundrel!" he shrieked, "you "but 



February 5, 1898. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



before he could get another word out Tom lay stretched at 
full length on the floor, seeing stars, moons and comets. 

The stranger had shot out from the shoulder with his 
right and uppercut with the left. When Tom came to, he 
found Joseph bathing his head and attempting to ad- 
minister some brandy. The stranger, perfectly composed, 
sat on a divan toying with Tom's revolver; the robe ae wait 
lay at his feet. 

"Who's that?" gasped Tom, nodding toward the 
stranger, and feeling his left eye and lower jaw. 

" That's Detective Sergeant Cuffy from the Central 
office," whispered Joseph in awe. 

"What in thunder is he doing here?" demanded Mr. 
Sutherland. 

"Didn't Mrs. Sutherland tell you, sir?" asked Joseph in 
surprise. "But, oh, Mr. Sutherland, please quit the 
drink, sir; you've got the horrors, sir, if you will pardon 
my speaking so bold and free like." 

"Cut all that and speak out — what is that man doing in 
my house?" 

"Haven't you heard about Marie, Mr. Sutherland?" 

"What about Marie," asked Tom dreamily. 

The detective now spoke for the first time. 

"I must ask your pardon, Mr. Sutherland, for knocking 
you down; I considered my life in danger. I arrested your 
wife's maid and her lover-accomplice. Isaac Marks, alias 
Sheenie Ike, as they were leaving a hotel early this 
morning. All of the stolen property was found in their 
possession, including the diamonds and the set of night 
dresses Mrs. Sutherland so particularly described. Here's 
one of them on the floor at your feet. 'Ike' and the wo- 
man were both togged out in your own and your wife's 
clothing, and were carrying their swag in your trunks. I 
hope I didn't hurt you, sir, but the fact is I hate to take 
chances with the D. T. 's and a loaded gun." 

This was adding insult to injury, Tom thought, but the 
recollection of the cruel injustice done the suffering woman 
upstairs brought all his manhood into being. 

"Cuffy, old man, I'm glad you knocked me down and 
brought me to my senses. Yes, Cuffy, drink's an awful 
thing; but let's have one. Joseph, open champagne. Ex- 
cuse me a moment; I have a few words to say to Mrs. 
Sutherland." 

Still sobbing, Marion lay on the floor of the library. 

"Marion," said Tom very softly, and there were tears in 
his voice. "Marion, can you ever forgive me. Speak, 
darling, speak to me," and he took her up in his arms. 
"Marion, dearest, I'll never touch another drop as long 
as I live. Thank God, I'm over the attack now." 

"But I never knew you drank, Tom, darling," she said 
chokingly, her tear-wet eyes gazing wonderingly into his. 

"No, dearie, no — that is, I never did before I visited 
Japan. While there I got into the habit of drinking saki, 
a liquor that is apt to make one imagine all kinds of horrid 
things. I had a fearful relapse this morning — but, oh, 
Marion,' I've brought you the rubies — four Burmah beau- 
ties. Hawker picked them out, and he's a judge, you 
know. Yes, I. always thought Marie a bad lot, but I never 
said so, you seemed" so pleased with her. Clever detective, 
that, to get everything back — your linen, too — the beauti- 
ful set I gave you for a wedding present. The one you 
gave me at parting I carried all the way back in my coat 
pocket thinking and dreaming of you, love, and your 
sweet welcome." 

To this day Mrs. Sutherland declares that Mr. Suther- 
land's saki drinking in Japan made his olfactory nerve 
hypersensitive, for the most delicate fleeting perfumes 
were noticed by him, especially the fairy breath of ira 
Wane. — Town Topics. 

A Panorama 440 Miles Long. 
From the Observation Car on the New York Central a living pan- 
orama 440 miles long may be seen. This includes the Genesse, 
Black River and Mohawk Valleys and 143 miles of the Hudson 
River, including the foothills of the Adirondack Mountains; the 
Capitol at Albany; the Catskill Mountains; the Palisades of the 
Hudson and the New York Central's magnificent approach to the 
metropolis— this being the only trunk line whose trains enter the 
city of New York. 

Aybks' Business College. 325 Montgomery. Individual instruction. 
shorthand, typewriting, bookkeeping, telegraphy; Hie! scholarship, $50; 
low rates per week and month; day; evening. Send tor catalogue. 




The 



(Remington 

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draw old friends closer and attract new 
ones, by the power of inherent merit and 
unfailing service. _^_ 

WYCKOFF. SEAMANS & BENEDICT 

211 Montgomery St., 

■m^^^b. San Franolsoo. — ■— — 



GEORGE MORROW & CO., (Establi8he d .sm.) 

HAY AND GRAIN 
Commission Merchants 



Warehouse 526 Seventh St. 



122 Clay street S P 
Telephone Main 35. 



Baggage Notice. 



Baggage called for and delivered 
at trains, steamers, etc. Trunks 
35 cents. Baggage called for, 
weighed and checked at your 
Hotel or residence. Trunks 50c. 



PACIFIC TRANSFER CO., 20 Sutter St. 



UNITED STATES 
LAUNDRY. 



Telephone South 420, 



Office, 1004 Market Street. 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



Partington's School 



424 FINE STREET, 5. F. 



MAGAZINE and 

of NEWSPAPER 

ILLUSTRATION 



Extra Classes on Saturdays and evenings. 



LUDLflltt. 



928 Sutter St. 



ELOCUTION and 

DRAMATIC ART. 



The SOLLY WALTER School oi Illustration, 



In Pen and ink. 



26 O'Farrell Street. 



SIGN0R FERNANDO MlGHELENfl, 

Vocal studio. Y. M. C. A. building, room 2, third floor. 
Complete artistic preparation, English, Italian, French and Spanish. Pose 
of voice, gesture, repertoire. Reception hours : 1 to 2 p. m. Terms moderate. 



DR. cJ. NICHOLS, 



(Formerly County Physician of Amador County.) 

Office: al Powell street, corner Powell and Ellis. Residence, 

Baldwin Hotel, S. F . Hours : l to 4 p. m. : 7 to 8 p. m. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 5, 1898. 




tfflL 




It is only a matter of time when 
The Normern Lights "another Klondike" will stand for 
In a Golden Eclipse, a polite but forcible designation of 
the offense for which Ananias and 
Sapphira were translated in sudden arid surprising haste 
to a realm of everlasting fire and brimstone, according to 
Holy Writ. The bubble seems destined to assume the full 
proportions of that of the South Sea and Dutch Bulb 
fiascos, of infamous memories, before up-to-date humanity 
is taught another lesson of the dangers attendant on the 
universal haste to grow rich. It is now safe to say that 
one-half of the published statements regarding the condi- 
tions and possibilities of mining in the Yukon region are a 
series of pure and unadulterated falsehoods, fostered by 
designing individuals and transportation companies, in a 
position to benefit by humbugging the public to a point 
which threatens a heavy loss of life. Of course an enor- 
mous amount of new money will be put into circulation, if 
that is any argument in favor of fiendishness disguised 
under the name of commercial enterprise. One company 
alone claims, and doubtless correctly, that instead of 
transporting 50,000 passengers as per original estimate, 
they have now to provide for from 82,000 to 100,000 appli- 
cants for passage. Take the last named number as the 
most reliable figure, which is very likely, and the minimum 
cost of transportation at $500, and no less a sum than 
$50,000,000 is transfeVred from one set of pockets to an- 
other. With this for one line alone, what an appalling 
range of figures it will take to represent the total outlay 
of money distributed among the outfitting and passenger 
lines all over the world. Experienced travelers in this 
Northern zone say that in addition to an outfit, which 
with transportation would be cheap at $500, no one should 
venture on the trip unless provided with $1,000 in cash. 
Lumping the sums together, and multiplied by the per 
capita of passenger lists from the different Western 
points of departure, and a sufficient reason can be ad- 
duced in good gold coin of all nations for the glittering 
blaze which is now kept up over the Yukon Valley, tran- 
scending in brilliancy the Aurora Borealis itself. 

That there is gold in this region of 
Emigration to Alaska vast and dreary solitudes cannot 
Should Be Stopped. be denied, but that it is in abund- 
ance, as one is led to believe from 
highly-tinted reports, is denied by the few honest and con- 
servative men who have personally investigated the mat- 
ter. The alleged discovery of the " Mother lode " is an- 
other instance of an exaggeration which is going to lead 
many to ruin, if not to death. Heavy capital can, from all 
reliable accounts, be used to good advantage in the Klon- 
dike, but reliable and experienced men, who have made a 
study of the district, all agree that there is no field there 
for the ordinary prospector, poorly equipped with supplies 
and tools, besides being, in nine cases out of ten, a mere 
tyro at the business. The United States Government has 
been warned in time of the true condition of affairs in the 
Klondike by Captain Ray, who was detailed to investigate 
and report on the situation. The tenor of his report is 
suflicient to warrant prompt action to check in some way 
the wild craze for emigration there before the trouble 
grows serious. If no work can be found for the thousands 
entering the territory this spring, destitution must follow, 
with all the horrors attached resulting from an absolute 
isolation from speedy relief. There are times when people 
should be protected from themselves, and this is one of 
them. 

The announcement has been made 

The Alaska Commer- by the Marquess of Dufferin, as 

ciai Company. chairman of the British American 

Corporation, Limited, that the 
negotiations for the acquisition of the business and prop- 
erties of the Alaska Commercial Company have been 
abandoned. In referring to this the Investors Guardian 
says editorially, that it would be idle to deny that the 
shareholders of the big London corporation were disap- 
pointed to hear this, there being no doubt that the men- 
tion of this undertaking had some influence in inducing 



subscriptions, and that the applicants for shares looked 
upon it as one of the "sure things" in the way of assets. 
This is correct. With the holdings of the Alaska Commer- 
cial as a basis to start with, the prospects of any company 
would be assured beyond peradventure of failure, and it 
was little wonder, therefore, that the shares of the Brit- 
ish American were subscribed for twice over. At that 
time all London was satisfied that the property of the 
California Company had been absorbed, the News Letter 
reporting the sale there as bona Jiile on the strength of a 
virtual acknowledgment of the fact by the London direc- 
tors. It is a late date, after the allottment of stock, to 
lop off such a valuable portion of their original undertak- 
ing, and it is well for the company that it has a stroDg 
enough backing to be able to brave public opinion upon this 
point. However, it is no small distinction to have a man 
like Lord Dufferin at the head of a company. He is no 
ordinary "guinea pig " in the true sense of the term, and 
the fact that he has assumed such a position means a full 
appreciation of all responsibilities involved, with an execu- 
tive ability of the highest order to cope with any difficul- 
ties in the way of success. For over thirty years Lord 
Dufferin has been intrusted with the highest diplomatic 
missions at the command of the British Government, and 
never has the trust placed in him been violated. As the 
head of any commercial or financial enterprise, he is the 
strongest man in Great Britain to-day in the matter of 
brains and a reputation beyond reproach. Had the 
Alaska Commercial passed in the course of trade from the 
hands of its present highly esteemed owners in this city, it 
could have gone under no safer control than that of a cor- 
poration whose interests are guarded by the famous 
diplomatist whose friends are legion, the world over. It 
will be a source of congratulation, nevertheless, that San 
Francisco, and not London, will still remain the head- 
quarters of this big and influential concern. The transfer 
of its business elsewhere, and the practical withdrawal 
of a generous and public-spirited management would have 
been a heavy loss to this city in more ways than one. 

The news that the management of 

The Taylor Mine the Taylor mine have struck it rich 

In Bonanza. in the north end workings, will not 

be much of a consolation to the 
would-be purchasers, who saw this valuable property slip 
through their fingers some months ago through an inabil- 
ity to raise enough money to comply with the terms of 
thtir contract. At that time the northern portion of the 
workings were terra incognita, and it is only of late that 
explorations in that quarter show that the true merits of 
this fine property lie in this direction. So much so, in 
fact, that the main work of ore extraction is carried on 
from stopes opened on the five, six and 800-levels, to the 
exclusion of the south end, where the ores are very low 
grade in comparison. Enough ore is now in sight, it is 
said, to keep the present plant running for many years. 
The improvements on the surface have kept pace with the 
developments in the mines, and a powerful electric plant 
is now running with many additions to the mill of modern 
gold and labor-saving machinery. The property is now 
looming up as one of the big mines of the State. 

Sierra Nevada has given dealers in the 
The Comstock mining market a good chance to make 
Mining Market, some money during the past week. The 
fluctuations have been wide and rapid 
enough to permit of turn after turn being made by active 
operators. The best of it is, the mine is in a condition to 
justify much higher prices. In the Reily tunnel a big 
ledge has been cut of ore which will average $20 per ton, 
and running high in gold. A few years ago the stock 
would have been selling in the neighborhood of $8 or $10 
per share on the same showing. The market should de- 
velop more actively before long under the influence of this 
improvement and brighter prospects at other points along 
the lode. 

THE Belfast Evening Telegraph announces that another 
great thread combination has been arranged, this time 
in the linen interest. The group comprises Barbour & 
Sons, of Hilden, near Belfast, and America; the Marshall 
Thread Company, of Paisley and New York; Finlayson, 
Bousfield & Co., Paisley; Knox & Co., Kilburnie, N. B., 
and other firms. The capital is to equal that of J. & P. 
Coats, Limited. 



February 5, 189S. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



13 




'Hear the Crier I" 'What the devil art thouV 
•Onethat will play thedevll. sir, with you." 






THE men and women in the employ of the city are not 
generally an overworked body of citizens. They have 
short hours, the pay is good, and holidays and Sundays are 
observed with commendable rigor. In the City Hall no 
man does probably an honest day's work, or, to qualify 
that statement, no person working in that burial ground 
of tax-payers' money does the amount of work he would do 
were he working for a private concern. But there is at 
least one notable exception — the East-street Branch Re- 
ceiving Hospital. There are only four doctors attached to 
that institution, and they have to be there night and day 
in alternate watches. Besides this, some of them have 
quarantine duty, which takes them out at all queer times 
in the morning. Then there are only two matrons. One 
is on duty from 7:30 A. M. till 5 p.m., and the other the rest 
of the night. They have no Sundays, no holidays. This 
should be changed. The city does not pay taxes for the 
benefit of a few. This hospital is ever busy. There were 
326 eases treated in the month of December. On a holi- 
day, such as last Monday, the hospital was busier than 
ever. What should be done is to increase the force both 
of the doctors and the matrons, so that they have some 
rest. Since the hospital was opened on July 3, 1897, there 
have been over 1700 cases treated. It is an outrage to 
make flesh of one institution and fish of another, and if 
there is to be liberality shown to employees of the city, it 
should be displayed to those working in the hospitals and 
not in the ranks of the loafers who are pretending to per- 
form clerical work out in the City Hall. For in most cases 
it is nothing but a pretense. 

DR. Thompson of Los Angeles has acquired a peculiar 
reputation as a preacher in that city. His vogue is 
Unitarianism, and it is said he is to be in Oakland, having 
accepted a call to that righteous city. Dr. Thompson's 
style of preaching borders on the farcical. He is vulgar 
and loud, and attempts to be funny, and never is be so 
pleased as when he succeeds in raising a laugh among his 
pious congregation. He tells alleged funny stories from 
the pulpit, and his humor is so crude that those who do not 
laugh with him manage to laugh at him. Among his other 
eccentricities he has frequently been heard to declare that 
dogs have souls. He, however, does not show how these 
canine souls are to be saved. This statement should endear 
him to our dog-men, who claim almost supernatural attri- 
butes for their racing canines. Perhaps Mr. Emmett V. 
Sullivan and Mr. Rossiter might be able to give the rever- 
end gentleman a few pointers on the question whether dogs 
have souls — especially when their dogs have gone back on 
them. But then, perhaps, a human soul ought to be 
saved. 

THERE are in San Francisco, Oakland, Alameda, and 
Sausalito thirty illegal practitioners — otherwise doc- 
tors. Leaving out the name of one Chinaman that makes 
twenty-nine. This is rather a decent showing, when every- 
thing is considered, and the desire on the part of the pub- 
lic to be gulled is also taken into consideration. Still, 
if their names are published in the Official Register, and 
residences given, it does seem strange that the law does 
not take some cognizance of the matter and persuade these 
men and women to lead more honest lives. 

S PROMINENT gentleman, commercially, and who is 
also socially inclined, has been attempting during the 
past few years to improve his language, with results which 
are fatal to the dignity of those hearing him. The other 
day he was approached by a persistent agent. "Get out 
of this," said the man of money; "lam busy and don't be 
a bothering me." Observing a friend in the doorway, the 
man of recent culture changed his tone to one of hauteur 
and sublime imperiousness, and said, " Please to evacuate 
my company." The agent evacuated. 



THE commission men and certain others individually in- 
terested are not in favor of the establishing of a Free 
Market in San Francisco, and it is alleged that these per- 
sons are doing all that is in their power to delay its open- 
ing. The benefits to be derived from a Free Market in 
San Francisco are untold. Oakland has a Free Market 
and the prices there are a revelation to household pur- 
veyors. It is stated and on good grounds that several 
economically-minded housewives do their purchasing in 
Oakland rather than stand the extortions practised on 
them by San Francisco dealers. The Free Market in 
Oakland is not patronized by the poor, but the very 
wealthiest of Oakland's ladies attend it— such people as 
the Chabots, the Littles and the Gregorys and others are 
its patrons. Now there is no reason why game, veg- 
etables and fish should not be sold as cheaply here as in 
Oakland. In the Oakland Free Market two squabs can 
be purchased for two-bits, here they are twenty-five cents 
apiece. Sole in Oakland sells at 5 cents per pound, here it 
is from 10 to 15 cents per pound. Clams are quoted at 15 
cents a quart, the Oakland Free Market sells them at 5 
cents for two dozen. The same ratio of prices prevail in 
vegetables, poultry, butter and eggs. The question of 
living is a serious one to many a household whether it be 
poor or moderately rich, and if the Free Market in Oak- 
land brings within the reach of all many a delicacy it will 
undoubtedly do the same here. It is to be hoped the 
Harbor Commissioners will see to it that a Free Market 
be soon established here, and that no quibbles prevent its 
early opening. 

ANOTHER absurd bluff was made by little Andy Law- 
rence last Monday in swearing out a warrant fo»" the 
arrest of Mr. H. E. Huntington in not providing the rail- 
road system over which he has control with fenders. The 
bluff caused a hearty laugh in the business community and 
among respectable citizens, because it was well known 
down town that Mr. Huntington had left last week for the 
East. Little Andy then seized the opportunity to make 
a display of his absurd methods by causing the paper next 
morning to be as cheap and ridiculous as himself. The ex- 
pea- nut butcher, however, has all the cunning of small- 
souled men by finding out that Mr. Huntington was out of 
reach. Then to further make an ass of himself, he had 
posted in the business office a placard that Mr. Hunting- 
ton was East, but would be arrested on his return. How 
all this must gall T. T. Williams, the business manager, 
who is a newspaper man and a gentleman, which unfortu- 
nately for poor W. R. Hearst, his managing editor is not. 

IT is the opinion of several unprejudiced persons that the 
acquisition by the California naval militia of the old hulk 
Marion, called vicariously cruiser, sloop-of-war, or battle- 
ship, will not conduce very greatly toward the manufac- 
turing of "sea dogs." How an old boat moored to a wharf 
or anchored in the bay is to teach seamanship is more than 
most people can understand. Our land forces generally 
make noble exhibitions when oalled upon of woful incompe- 
tency, and there is not the slightest doubt that Captain 
Farragut Turner and Lieutenant Paul Jones Petersen 
will have under their command equally as meritorious, but 
also seasick, warriors. However, why should anybody 
grumble ? Is it not a beauteous sight to see General John 
H. Dickinson in uniform, Major or Colonel Bergen, and 
others? Well, let us then also feast our eyes on Captain 
Farragut Turner and Lieutenant Paul Jones Petersen in 
the pride of naval toggery. 

ft CERTAIN Mrs. Martin, somewhat good-looking, with 
some streaks of gray in her hair, is most anxious to 
reach the gold fields, and on the "Alaska." Now the 
officers and owners of the "Alaska" are a very moral set 
of men, and they do not desire the presence of a lady on 
board their vessel husbandless. Mrs. Martin has been 
quietly made aware of that fact, but Mrs. Martin has no 
intention of taking a hint, and she has almost driven Cap- 
tain Billy Coogan into the verge of insanity by haunting 
his office and wanting to know how much flour she needs 
for the Klondike, and what kind of sleigh. Mrs. Martin 
has no abhorrence except for newspaper notoriety; and 
for that reason she wants to escape to the Klondike. She 
hopes there she can do all she has a mind to, without pub- 
licity. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 5, 1898. 




5UNBEAMS 




"1 am s-s-sorrv you are s-s-so su-su-su-perstitious, Miss 
P-pritnrose. You w-w-wouldn't undertake any k-k-kind 
of bub-business on F-f-f-friday, would you?" "Why do you 
ask, Mr. Tompkins?" "B-b-because if it wasn't F-f-friday 
I'd ask you to mum-mum-marry me." "It only lacks an 
hour of midnight, Mr. Tompkins. Go ahead, if you please. 
I'll take my chances on its being Saturday before you get 
through."— Cleveland Plain Dealer. 

"The statuary was perfectly stunning, wasn't it?" "I 
didn't find it so. I felt dreadfully conscious when we were 
passing those nudes." After that these two young girls 
spoke of matters more closel